Friday, October 28, 2011

AUSTRALIA: NATIONAL MEN OF GOD CONFERENCE

By Fiona Basile

YMG conferenceOne hundred and forty men from across Australia gathered at the Collaroy Centre in Northern Sydney for the 6th National ‘Young Men of God’ conference.

YMG conferenceThe weekend was held between 14-16 October with men from all walks of life attending, and of all ages – the youngest being 16-years. Seventeen men from the Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne attended.

YMG conferenceThe theme of the conference was ‘Don’t be afraid to be a witness to Christ’, with the men enjoying daily praise and worship, Mass, adoration, prayer ministry and a series of talks and workshops.

YMG conferenceSome of the guest speakers included Fr Chris Ryan MGL, Sam Clear, who walked around the world for 18 months for Christian Unity, authors and international speakers from Choicez Media Jonathon and Karen Doyle, Shayne Bennett, founder of NET Ministries and leader of Emmanuel community in Brisbane and Fr Ken Barker MGL, who founded the movement in 2000. There was also plenty of time for sports and social activities down by the nearby beach.

YMG conferenceYMG is a movement of 16-35 year-old Catholic men committed to being transformed by God’s Word and empowered by the Spirit to courageously stand up and be men of example and influence within their family, workplace, community, country and the world.

Father Ken has a strong conviction that God has a plan for young men to rise up in the Church today with a deep faith, purity of heart and strength of character and to become leaders for the future.

Melbourne-based member Luke O’Connor said, “The Young Men of God movement is about a brotherhood of men walking together in faith”.

“Our mission is to re-ignite men throughout our country, to help them reach their God-given potential, to be heralds of the truth for future generations and to empower others to realise their immense value and purpose as children of God.”

“YMG is a valuable resource for empowering men to be leaders in their respective parishes and communities and in the world. We achieve this through conferences, weekends away, regular small groups and fellowship.

“One of the major things for YMG is that we are for all men from all walks of life no matter where they are on their faith journey. We have guys who are in RCIA through to consecrated and Priests, married and lay single men."

Ben O'Heir from Canberra is married with two children and one on the way. He said: “We need good men to stand up and be counted and we need to support our men for the future of the country.

“When you look back on your life at 70, what legacy are you going to leave? Young Men Of God is a resource for the Catholic Church.”

James McAlpin, from Melbourne, first heard about the conference through a close friend of his who had participated in the ‘Sisterhood’ national conference also held at the Collaroy Centre.

“When I think about the weekend and past experiences in my life, this has to be up there with the best of them,” he said. “I have been involved in many football trips and weekends away, but none of these weekends compare to the richness and constant ‘golden’ offerings that have been provided here.”

“Speaking to all the lads, who have their own unique stories to tell, was a highlight, as were the talks, the games and even the food. The many hours I spent with the Lord in quiet prayer and adoration was also a highlight.”

YMG is currently based in Melbourne, Canberra, Sydney, Brisbane and Adelaide. In Melbourne, YMG runs a fortnightly ‘Connect night’ for men. For more information, seewww.ymgmovement.org

Photos by James McAlpin

Photos above: Participants at the 6th National 'Young Men of God' Conference; Fr Chris Ryan MGL; Fr Dave Callaghan MGL leads mass outdoors; Participants at the outdoor mass; David Mazzarelli (Adelaide), Adam Crouch (Melbourne), Tim Davis (Melbourne), Joe Hicks (Adelaide) and Anthony Callisto (Adelaide). http://www.cam.org.au/news/young-men-of-god-gather-for-national-conference.html


  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!

  • Click to open image!

  • Click to open image!
    Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!
  • Click to open image!

EUROPE: COMECE PLENARY ASSEMBLY OCT. 26-28

COMECE REPORT: Autumn Plenary Assembly 2011

The Financial Crisis and the future of European Integration

unknownThe COMECE Autumn Plenary Assembly will be held from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28 October 2011 in Brussels. 23 COMECE Member Bishops will be present. The main topic of the Plenary will be « The Financial Crisis and the future of European Integration »


The Bishops will analyse the economical and political reasons for the debt crisis in Europe and the instruments that have been set up to tackle the crisis. They will also reflect on “confidence” as a key factor to solve the crisis in a political, economical and social context.

Programme in PDF

Speakers on the Main topic :

- Mr Peter Wagner, Head of Unit, Task Force for Greece, European Commission.

unknownProf. Dr. Lans Bovenberg,

Tilburg University (The Netherlands)

unknownSpeech of Dr. Emmanuel van der Mensbrugghe,

Director of the IMF Offices in Europe, International Monetary Fund

"There is a simple message, which is that the global economy needs more cooperation today than ever before. Europe was an early leader in economic cooperation and coordination. It needs to assume that role once again. Putting in place a comprehensive approach to Europe’s problems is now a matter of urgency not just for the crisis countries, but for all the countries in the euro zone. It is a defining moment, and the time to act is now."

Download the full speech in PDF

unknownM. Jean-Pierre Jouyet, President of the French Financial Markets Authority

"Pour restaurer la confiance il faut remettre l’Eglise au centre du village, c'est-à-dire l’homme au centre de l’économie, et les marchés à son service. Ce n’est pas utopique, Des réformes sont possibles. Il faut bien en poser les objectifs. Il faut adopter des politiques vigoureuses en matière de régulation et à nous pencher sans tabou sur la meilleure manière de renforcer la gouvernance de l’Union européenne et de la zone Euro."

Download the full Speech in PDF

COMECE Plenary assemblies are closed to the public.

There will be no Press Conference.

A final press release will be issued as usual on Friday at noon.


For interview requests an any further information, please contact Johanna Touzel, spokesperson and COMECE Press Officer

Tel +32 (0)2 235 05 15

johanna.touzel@comece.eu

http://www.comece.org/site/en/activities/plenaryassemblies/2011/article/4264.html?SWS=03b182c93cb7b2588571c2c476da7ac4

TODAY'S SAINT: OCT. 28: ST. JUDE APOSTLE

St. Jude
APOSTLE
Feast: October 28
Information:
Feast Day:
October 28
Major Shrine:
Saint Peter's, Rome, Rheims, Toulouse, France
Patron of:
lost causes, desperate situations, hospitals

The apostle St. Jude is distinguished from the Iscariot by the surname of Thaddaus, which signifies in Syriac praising or confession (being of the same import with the Hebrew word Judas), also by that of Lebbaeus, which is given him in the Greek text of St. Matthew. St. Jude was brother to St. James the Less, as he styles himself in his epistle; likewise of St. Simeon of Jerusalem, and of one Joses, who are styled the brethren of our Lord, and were sons of Cleophas and Mary, sister to the Blessed Virgin.
This apostle's kindred and relation to our Saviour exalted him not so much in his Master's eyes as his contempt of the world the ardour of his holy zeal and love, and his sufferings for his sake. It is not known when and by what means he became a disciple of Christ, nothing having been said of him in the gospels before we find him enumerated in the catalogue of the apostles. After the last supper, when Christ promised to manifest himself to every one who should love him, St. Jude asked him why he did not manifest himself to the world? By which question he seems to have expressed his expectation of a secular kingdom of the Messias. Christ by his answer satisfied him that the world is unqualified for divine manifestations, being a stranger and an enemy to what must fit souls for a fellowship with heaven; but that he would honour those who truly love him with his familiar converse, and would admit them to intimate communications of grace and favour.
After our Lord's ascension and the descent of the Holy Ghost, St. Jude set out, with the other great conquerors of the world and hell, to pull down the prince of darkness from his usurped throne; which this little troop undertook to effect armed only with the word of God and his Spirit. Nicephorus, Isidore, and the Martyrologies tell us that St. Jude preached up and down Judea, Samaria, Idumaa, and Syria; especially in Mesopotamia. St. Paulinus says that St. Jude planted the faith in Libya. This apostle returned from his missions to Jerusalem in the year 62, after the martyrdom of his brother, St. James, and assisted at the election of St. Simeon, who was likewise his brother. He wrote a catholic or general epistle to all the churches of the East, particularly addressing himself to the Jewish converts, amongst whom he had principally laboured. St. Peter had written to the same two epistles before this, and in the second had chiefly in view to caution the faithful against the errors of the Simonians, Nicholaits, and Gnostics. The havoc which these heresies continued to make among souls stirred up the zeal of St. Jude, who sometimes copied certain expressions of St. Peter, and seems to refer to the epistles of SS. Peter and Paul as if the authors were then no more. The heretics he describes by many strong epithets and similes, and calls them wandering meteors which seem to blaze for a while but set in eternal darkness. The source of their fall he points out by saying they are murmurers, and walk after their own lusts. The apostle puts us in mind to have always before our eyes the great obligation we lie under of incessantly building up our spiritual edifice of charity, by praying in the Holy Ghost, growing in the love of God, and imploring his mercy through Christ. From Mesopotamia St. Jude travelled into Persia. Fortunatus and the western Martyrologists tell us that the apostle St. Jude suffered martyrdom in Persia; the Menology of the Emperor Basil and some other Greeks say at Arat or Ararat, in Armenia, which at that time was subject to the Parthian empire, and consequently esteemed part of Persia. Many Greeks say he was shot to death with arrows: some add whilst he was tied on across. The Armenians at this day venerate him and St. Bartholomew for the first planters of the faith among them.

TODAY'S SAINT: OCT. 28: ST. SIMON APOSTLE


St. Simon
APOSTLE
Feast: October 28
Information:
Feast Day:
October 28
Born:
Cana or Canaan
Died:
Abyssinians claim he was crucified in Samaria; Lipsius says he was sawn in half at Suanir, Persia; Moses of Chorene writes that he was martyred at Weriosphora in Iberia; many locations claim to have relics including Toulouse, France, and Saint Peter's Basilica, Rome, Italy
Major Shrine:
relics claimed by many places, including Toulouse; Saint Peter's Basilica
Patron of:
curriers; sawyers; tanners

St Simon is surnamed the Canaanean or Canaanite, and the Zealot, to distinguish him from St. Peter, and from St. Simeon, the brother of St. James the Less, and his successor in the see of Jerusalem. From the first of these surnames some have thought that St. Simon was born at Cana, in Galilee: certain modern Greeks pretend that it was at his marriage that our Lord turned the water into wine. It is not to be doubted but he was a Galilean. Theodoret says, of the tribe either of Zabulon or Nepthali. Hammond and Grotius think that St. Simon was called the Zealot, before his coming to Christ, because he was one of that particular sect or party among the Jews called Zealots, from a singular zeal they possessed for the honour of God and the purity of religion. A party called Zealots were famous in the war of the Jews against the Romans. They were main instruments in instigating the people to shake off the yoke of subjection; they assassinated many of the nobility and others in the streets, filled the temple itself with bloodshed and other horrible profanations, and were the chief cause of the ruin of their country. But no proof is offered by which it is made to appear that any such party existed in our Saviour's time, though some then maintained that it was not lawful for a Jew to pay taxes to the Romans At least if any then took the name Zealots, they certainly neither followed the impious conduct nor adopted the false and inhuman maxims of those mentioned by Josephus in his history of the Jewish war against the Romans.
St. Simon, after his conversion, was zealous for the honour of his Master, and exact in all the duties of the Christian religion; and showed a pious indignation toward those who professed this holy faith with their mouths, but dishonoured it by the irregularity of their lives. No further mention appears of him in the gospels than that he was adopted by Christ into the college of the apostles. With the rest he received the miraculous gifts of the Holy Ghost, which he afterwards exercised with great zeal and fidelity. If this apostle preached in Egypt, Cyrene, and Mauritania, he returned into the East; for the Martyrologies of St. Jerome, Bede, Ado, and Usuard place his martyrdom in Persia, at a city called Suanir, possibly in the country of the Suani, a people in Colchis, or a little higher in Sarmatia, then allied with the Parthians in Persia; which may agree with a passage in the Acts of St. Andrew, that in the Cimmerian Bosphorus there was a tomb in a "rot, with an inscription importing that Simon the Zealot was interred there. His death is said in these Martyrologies to have been procured by the idolatrous priests. Those who mention the manner of his death say he was crucified. St. Peter's Church on the Vatican at Rome and the Cathedral of Toulouse are said to possess the chief portions of the relics of SS. Simon and Jude.

TODAY'S GOSPEL: OCT. 28: LUKE 6: 12 - 16

Luke 6: 12 - 16
12In these days he went out to the mountain to pray; and all night he continued in prayer to God.
13And when it was day, he called his disciples, and chose from them twelve, whom he named apostles;
14Simon, whom he named Peter, and Andrew his brother, and James and John, and Philip, and Bartholomew,
15and Matthew, and Thomas, and James the son of Alphaeus, and Simon who was called the Zealot,
16and Judas the son of James, and Judas Iscariot, who became a traitor.