Saturday, February 28, 2015

Saint March 1 : St. Suitbert : Patron of Angina Sufferers; Throat diseases


St. Suitbert
APOSTLE OF THE FRISIANS
Feast: March 1


     Information:
Feast Day:March 1
Born:
647
Died:1 March 713 near Düsseldorf, Germany 
Patron of:angina sufferers; Germany; throat diseases
Apostle of the Frisians, b. in England in the seventh century; d. at Suitberts-Insel, now Kaiserswerth, near Dusseldorf, 1 March, 713. He studied in Ireland, at Rathmelsigi, Connacht, along with St. Egbert. The latter, filled with zeal for the conversion of the Germans, had sent St. Wihtberht, or Wigbert, to evangelize the Frisians, but owing to the opposition of the pagan ruler, Rathbod, Wihtberht was unsuccessful and returned to England. Egbert then sent St. Willibrord and his twelve companions, among whom was St. Suitbert. They landed near the mouth of the Rhine and journeyed to Utrecht, which became their headquarters. The new missionaries worked with great success under the protection of Pepin of Heristal, who, having recently conquered a portion of Frisia, compelled Rathbod to cease harassing the Christians. Suitbert laboured chiefly in North Brabant, Guelderland, and Cleves. After some years he went back to England, and in 693 was consecrated in Mercia as a missionary bishop by St. Wilfrid of York. He returned to Frisia and fixed his see at Wijkbij Duurstede on a branch of the Rhine. A little later, entrusting his flock of converts to St. Willibrord, he proceeded north of the Rhine and the Lippe, among the Bructeri, or Boructuari, in the district of Berg, Westphalia. This mission bore great fruit at first, but was eventually a failure owing to the inroads of the pagan Saxons; when the latter had conquered the territory, Suitbert withdrew to a small island in the Rhine, six miles from Dusseldorf, granted to him by Pepin of Heristal, where he built a monastery and ended his days in peace. His relics were rediscovered in 1626 at Kaiserwerth and are still venerated there. St. Suitbert of Kaiserwerdt is to be distinguished from a holy abbot, Suitbert, who lived in a monastery near the River Dacore, Cumberland, England, about forty years later, and is mentioned by Venerable Bede.

(Taken From Catholic Encyclopedia)

Catholic Quote to SHARE by GK Chesterton "To love means loving the unlovable. To forgive means..."


"To love means loving the unlovable. To forgive means pardoning the unpardonable. Faith means believing the unbelievable. Hope means hoping when everything seems hopeless."
G. K. Chesterton Catholic Writer
(29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936)

Today's Mass Readings : Saturday February 28, 2015

Saturday of the First Week of Lent
Lectionary: 229


Reading 1DT 26:16-19

Moses spoke to the people, saying:
“This day the LORD, your God,
commands you to observe these statutes and decrees.
Be careful, then,
to observe them with all your heart and with all your soul.
Today you are making this agreement with the LORD:
he is to be your God and you are to walk in his ways
and observe his statutes, commandments and decrees,
and to hearken to his voice.
And today the LORD is making this agreement with you:
you are to be a people peculiarly his own, as he promised you;
and provided you keep all his commandments,
he will then raise you high in praise and renown and glory
above all other nations he has made,
and you will be a people sacred to the LORD, your God,
as he promised.”

Responsorial PsalmPS 119:1-2, 4-5, 7-8

R. (1b) Blessed are they who follow the law of the Lord!
Blessed are they whose way is blameless,
who walk in the law of the LORD.
Blessed are they who observe his decrees,
who seek him with all their heart.
R. Blessed are they who follow the law of the Lord!
You have commanded that your precepts
be diligently kept.
Oh, that I might be firm in the ways
of keeping your statutes!
R. Blessed are they who follow the law of the Lord!
I will give you thanks with an upright heart,
when I have learned your just ordinances.
I will keep your statutes;
do not utterly forsake me.
R. Blessed are they who follow the law of the Lord!

Verse Before The Gospel2 COR 6:2B

Behold, now is a very acceptable time;
behold, now is the day of salvation.

GospelMT 5:43-48

Jesus said to his disciples:
“You have heard that it was said,
You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.
But I say to you, love your enemies,
and pray for those who persecute you,
that you may be children of your heavenly Father,
for he makes his sun rise on the bad and the good,
and causes rain to fall on the just and the unjust.
For if you love those who love you, what recompense will you have?
Do not the tax collectors do the same?
And if you greet your brothers and sisters only,
what is unusual about that?
Do not the pagans do the same?
So be perfect, just as your heavenly Father is perfect.”

RIP Bishop Baissari of Lebanon "I go to find the faithful wherever they are,"

Bishop Baïssari dies poor, but rich in Christian virtues
by Fady Noun
As a professor, as a priest and as a bishop, he trained a generation of Lebanese to love the Church, Lebanon and everything that is right.

Beirut (AsiaNews) - He died like his teacher, like his brother and friend Jesus, poor in things but rich in Christian virtues. Bishop Francis Baïssari was a man of heart, a beloved man. Maronite Patriarch Bechara al-Rahi led his funeral service yesterday before a large crowd.
In his homily, the patriarch remembered his sense of humor, his good nature and his talent as a storyteller, which had conquered John Paul II, something that can be seen in a picture in which he is holding the head of a bishop, and kissing his bald crown during the Synod for Lebanon, in 1995.
Those who knew him and were by his side until the end remember a man whose joy could be contagious. He died, said Card Rahi, reciting Psalm 122: "I rejoiced when they said to me, 'Let us go to the house of the Lord.'"
Born in Qnat, Francis Baïssari was ordained priest in 1962. He began his service in the Diocese of Batrun, teaching philosophy in local schools, before becoming its bishop, for 27 years.
As a professor, as a priest and as a bishop, has trained a generation of Lebanese to love the Church, Lebanon and everything that is right, constantly filling the gap between the Maronite Church and its elites.
It was therefore no coincidence that he translated into Arabic the fundamental texts of the great Council, the main ecclesial event of the 20th Century according to John Paul II, with his fellow priestly league members Abdo Khalife and Youssef Bechara, who later became bishops.
His ministry, in many respects, anticipated Pope Francis' own down-to-earth style. "I go to find the faithful wherever they are," he used to say.

In the two dioceses where he served -Batrun and Hadeth el-Joubbé - his love for the poor was legendary. He took particular care of his priests. In Joubbé, he ordained 32 of them, with whom he shared all things, which became very little in recent years. (FN)

Pope Francis "fatal loop of egoism, “which has the god of money at the centre...”


Pope Francis urges co-operative movements to promote "economy of honesty" on 28 February in the Paul VI Hall. - OSS_ROM
28/02/2015 15:


(Vatican Radio) It was another lesson in the economic thought of Pope Francis. In an audience with members of the Confederazione Cooperative Italiane (confederation of Italian co-operatives) on Saturday, Pope Francis gave the 7,000 people present five practical suggestions for their mission in the context of the current “throwaway culture.”
First, the Pope said, co-operatives must continue to be “the motor that uplifts and develops the weakest parts of our local communities and civil society.”
The first priority is to establish new co-operatives, while developing existing ones, so as to create new employment opportunities, especially among youth, he said.
Second, the Pope urged the co-op movement to be a “protagonist” in proposing new welfare solutions, particularly in the area of healthcare. 
As a third point, he spoke of the economy and its relationship with social justice and human dignity. Speaking of the need to “globalize solidarity,” he urged the confederation to bring co-operatives to the “existential peripheries” and to continue to be “prophetic” by “inventing new forms of co-operation.” 
The Pope spoke of “a certain liberalism,” which “believes it is first necessary to produce wealth—and it does not matter how—to then promote some state redistribution policy.”
Others think it is up to a company to “bestow the crumbs of accumulated wealth” to those in need to then, in turn, “absolve themselves” of “their so-called ‘social responsibility’,” the Pope said.
“You run the risk of deluding yourself that you are doing good while, unfortunately, you continue only to do marketing,” without ever escaping the “fatal loop” of egoism, “which has the god of money at the centre,” he said.
Instead, the co-operative creates a “new type of economy” that allows “people to grow in all their potential,” socially and professionally, as well as in responsibility, hope and co-operation, he said. The Pope clarified that while he was not saying income growth is not important, it certainly “is not enough.”
Fourth, he said, the co-operative movement can exercise an important role in sustaining, facilitating and encouraging family life, by insisting on work-life balance, which would “help women to realize fully their own vocation and to put into practice their own talents.”
In this way, he said, women are “free to be always greater protagonists, whether at work or in families.”
Fifth, where few resources exist to start up  new projects, the Pope urged the co-op movement to “invest well,” in particular by putting together “good resources to realize good works.” He urged more collaboration among credit unions and co-op businesses and the establishment of resources “for families to live with dignity and serenity.”
He also warned against money becoming an idol, citing St Francis of Assisi in calling it “the devil’s dung.”
“When money becomes an idol, it controls man’s choices,” he said. “It makes him a slave.”
He exhorted the co-operative movement to join the global economy to promote both "an economy of honesty" and "a healing economy." He urged them to exercise “the courage and the imagination to build a just path, so as to integrate development, justice and peace in the world.”
He concluded by calling on the members of the Catholic confederation to maintain their Catholic identity and values in their current collaboration with other co-op groups in creating a large national association.
“Live your alliance (with these other groups) as Christians, as a response to your faith and identity, without fear. Faith and identity at the base,” he said.
“And this is also a Christian call to all,” he continued off-the-cuff. “Christian values not only for ourselves. They are to be shared. Share them with those, who do not think as we do but who want the same thing that we want.”
Italy's church-based co-op movement began in the late 19th century, inspired by the encyclical Rerum Novarum, written by Pope Leo XIII. 
The Confederazione Cooperative Italiane was first founded in 1919. It was suppressed by the Fascist Regime and re-established in 1945.