Monday, July 27, 2015

Saint July 28 : St. Victor I : 1st #Pope from #Africa - Died 199 AD


St. Victor I
POPE
Feast: July 28


Information:
Feast Day:July 28

(189-198 or 199), date of birth unknown. The "Liber Pontificalis" makes him a native of Africa and gives his father the name of Felix. This authority, taking the "Liberian Catalogue" as its basis, gives the years 186-197 as the period of Victor's episcopate. The Armenian text of the "Chronicle" of Eusebius (Leipzig, 1911, p. 223) places the beginning of Victor's pontificate in the seventh year of the reign of the Emperor Commodus (180-87) and gives it a duration of twelve years; in his "Church History" (V, xxxii, ed. Schwarts, Leipzig, 1902, p. 486) Eusebius transfers the beginning of the pontificate to the tenth year of the reign of Commodus and makes it last ten years. During the closing years of the reign of Commodus (180-192) and the early years of Septimius Severus (from 193) the Roman Church enjoyed in general great external peace. The favourable opinion of the Christians held by Commodus is ascribed to the influence of a woman named Marcia. According to the testimony of Hippolytus ("Philosophumena", IX, 12) she had been brought up by the presbyter Hyacinthus, was very favourably inclined towards the Christians, perhaps even a Christian herself (Hippolytus, loc. cit., calls her philotheos God-loving). One day she summoned Pope Victor to the imperial palace and asked for a list of the Roman Christians who had been condemned to forced labour in the mines of Sardinia, so that she might obtain their freedom. 
The pope handed her the list and Marcia, having received from the emperor the required pardon, sent the presbyter Hyacinthus to Sardinia with an order of release for the Christian confessors. Callistus, afterwards pope, who had been among those deported, did not return to Rome, but remained at Antium, where he received a monthly pension from the Roman Christians. Irenaeus ("Adv. Haerses", IV, xxx, 1) points out that Christians were employed at this period as officials of the imperial Court. Among these officials was the imperial freedman Prosenes, whose gravestone and epitaph have been preserved (De Rossi, "Inscriptiones christ. urbis Romae", I, 9, no. 5). Septimius Severus, also, during the early years of his reign, regarded the Christians kindly, so that the influence of Christian officials continued. The emperor retained in his palace a Christian named Proculus who had once cured him. He protected Christian men and women of rank against the excesses of the heathen rabble, and his son Caracalla had a Christian wet nurse (Tertullian, "Ad Scapulam", IV). Christianity made great advances in the capital and also found adherents among the families who were distinguished for wealth and noble descent (Eusebius, "Hist. eccl.", V, xxi).
Internal dissensions during this era affected the Church at Rome. The dispute over the celebration of Easter . . . grew more acute. The Christians at Rome, who had come from the province of Asia, were accustomed to observe Easter on the 14th day of Nisan, whatever day of the week that date might happen to fall on, just as they had done at home. This difference inevitably led to trouble when it appeared in the Christian community of Rome. Pope Victor decided, therefore, to bring about unity in the observance of the Easter festival and to persuade the Quartodecimans to join in the general practice of the Church. He wrote, therefore, to Bishop Polycrates of Ephesus and induced the latter to call together the bishops of the province of Asia in order to discuss the matter with them. This was done; but in the letter sent by Polycrates to Pope Victor he declared that he firmly held to the Quartoceciman custom observed by so many celebrated and holy bishops of that region. Victor called a meeting of Italian bishops at Rome, which is the earliest Roman synod known. He also wrote to the leading bishops of the various districts, urging them to call together the bishops of their sections of the country and to take counsel with them on the question of the Easter festival. Letters came from all sides: from the synod in Palestine, at which Theophilus of Caesarea and Narcissus of Jerusalem presided; from the synod of Pontus over which Palmas as the oldest presided; from the communities in Gaul whose bishop of Irenaeus of Lyons; from the bishops of the Kingdom of Osrhoene; also from individual bishops, as Bakchylus of Corinth. These letters all unanimously reported that Easter was observed on Sunday.. Victor, who acted throughout the entire matter as the head of Catholic Christendom, now called upon the bishops of the province of Asia to abandon their custom and to accept the universally prevailing practice of always celebrating Easter on Sunday. In case they would not do this he declared they would be excluded from the fellowship of the Church.
This severe procedure did not please all the bishops. Irenaeus of Lyons and others wrote to Pope Victor; they blamed his severity, urged him to maintain peace and unity with the bishops of Asia, and to entertain affectionate feelings toward them. Irenaeus reminded him that his predecessors had indeed always maintained the Sunday observance of Easter, as was right, but had not broken off friendly relations and communion with bishops because they followed another custom (Eusebius, "Hist. eccl.", V, xxiii-xxv.) We have no information concerning the further course of the matter under Victor I so far as it regards the bishops of Asia. All that is known is that in the course of the third century the Roman practice in the observance of Easter became gradually universal. In Rome itself, where Pope Victor naturally enforced the observance of Easter on Sunday by all Christians in the capital, an Oriental named Blastus, with a few followers, opposed the pope and brought about a schism, which, however, did not grow in importance (Eusebius, loc. cit., B, xx). Pope Victor also had difficulties with a Roman priest named Florinus, who probably came from Asia Minor. As an official of the imperial court, Florinus had become acquainted in Asia Minor with St. Polycarp, and later was a presbyter of the Roman Church. He fell into the Gnostic heresy and defended the false learning of Valentine. St. Irenaeus wrote two treatises against him: "On the Monarchy [of God] and that God is not the Author of Evil", and "On the Ogdoad". Irenaeus also called Victor's attention to the dangerous writings of Florinus, who was probably degraded from his priestly functions by the pope and expelled from the Church (Eusebius, "Hist. eccl.", V, xv, 20).
During the pontificate of Victor a rich Christian, Theodotus the Leather-seller, came from Constantinople to Rome and taught false doctrines concerning Christ, Whom he declared to be merely a man endowed by the Holy Ghost, at baptism, with supernatural power. The pope condemned this heresy and excluded Theodotus from the Church. The latter, however, would not submit, but, together with his adherents, formed a schismatic party, which maintained itself for a time at Rome. Victor may also have come into contact with the Montanists. Tertullian reports ("Ad Praceam", 1) that a Roman bishop, whose name he does not give, had declared his acceptance of the prophecies of Montanus, but had been persuaded by Praxeas to withdraw. Duchesne ("Histoire ancienne de l'├ęglise", I, 278) and others think Tertullian means Pope Eleutherius, but many investigators consider it more probable that he meant Pope Victor, because the latter had had much to do with the inhabitants of Asia Minor, and because, between 190 and 200, Praceas had gone from Rome to Carthage, where he was opposed by Tertullian. The question cannot be decided positively


SOURCE: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/V/stvictori.asp#ixzz1TMuuCWQj

Latest #News of #Vatican Information Service and #PopeFrancis to SHARE


27-07-2015 - Year XXII - Num. 141 

Summary
- Angelus: Jesus counters market logic with the logic of giving
- Appeal for the liberation of Dall'Oglio and Orthodox bishops abducted in Syria
- Pope's message to the new Patriarch of Cilicia of the Armenians
- Telegram for the death of Cardinal William Wakefield Baum
- Cardinal Meisner, Pope's special envoy to the inauguration of the Maria Radna convent complex in Timisoara
- Other Pontifical Acts
Angelus: Jesus counters market logic with the logic of giving
Vatican City, 26 July 2015 (VIS) – At midday today Pope Francis appeared at the window of his study in the Vatican Apostolic Palace to pray the Angelus with the faithful gathered in St. Peter's Square. He commented on the day's Gospel passage, which narrates “the great sign of the multiplication of the loaves”, when Jesus finds Himself on the shores of the Sea of Galilee surrounded by the multitude, drawn by the “signs He was performing on the sick”.
Francis remarked that God's merciful power acts in Christ, curing every malady of the body and the spirit. But He is not merely a healer, He is also a teacher; He teaches from the “cathedra” represented by the mount and tests His disciples, asking them how they can give food to all the people present. The apostle Philip makes a rapid calculation, confirming that by organising a collection they could raise at most two hundred denari to buy bread, which would not be sufficient to feed five thousand people.
“The disciples reason in 'market' terms, but Jesus substitutes the logic of buying with the logic of giving”, explained the Pope. “And at this point Andrew, the brother of Simon Peter, presents a boy who offers all he has: five loaves and two fishes, which are certainly not enough for so many people, Andrew says”. But this was exactly what Jesus was expecting, and so He tells the disciples to ask the people to be seated, takes the loaves and fishes, blesses them, gives thanks to the Father and distributes them.
“These gestures anticipate those of the Last Supper, which gives Jesus' bread its truest meaning. God's bread is Jesus Himself. Making Communion with Him, we receive His life in us and become children of the heavenly Father and brothers among ourselves. In this communion we encounter Jesus, truly alive and risen! Participating in the Eucharist means entering into Jesus' logic, the logic of gratuity, of sharing. And poor though we may be, we can all give something. 'Making Communion' means drawing from Christ the grace that makes us capable of sharing what we are and what we have with others”.
The crowd is astonished by the miracle of the multiplication of the loaves, “but the gift that Jesus offers is the fullness of life for famished mankind. Jesus satisfies not only material hunger, but also the most profound hunger for the meaning of life: our hunger for God. Faced with suffering, loneliness, poverty and the difficulties of so many people, what can we do? Complaining resolves nothing, but we can offer what little we have, like the boy in the Gospel. We all surely have a little time, some kind of talent, some kind of expertise to offer. Who among us does not have their 'five loaves and two fishes'? We all have it! If we are willing to place it in the Lord’s hands, it would be enough to bring to the world a little more love, peace, justice and above all, joy. How much we are in need of joy in the world! God is capable of multiplying our little gestures of solidarity and letting us participate in His gift”.
Appeal for the liberation of Dall'Oglio and Orthodox bishops abducted in Syria
Vatican City, 26 July 2015 (VIS) – Following the Angelus prayer, the Pope recalled that registration began today for the 31st World Youth Day, to be held in 2016 in Krakow, Poland. He was the first to register as a pilgrim by means of an electronic device brought to him by a boy and girl, before the faithful in St. Peter's Square. “The Day will coincide with the Year of Mercy”, he observed, “and will be, in a certain sense, a jubilee of youth called upon to reflect on the theme 'Blessed are the merciful, for they will find mercy'. I invite the young from all over the world to live this pilgrimage either by going to Krakow or by participating in this moment of grace within their communities”.
He continued, “In a few days' time it will be the second anniversary of the kidnapping of Fr. Paolo Dall'Oglio. I wish to make a heartfelt and urgent appeal for the liberation of this esteemed religious man. Similarly, I do not forget the Orthodox bishops abducted in Syria, nor all the other people kidnapped in war zones. I hope that the competent authorities, both local and international, may redouble their efforts to enable freedom to be restored to these brothers of ours. With affection and participation in their suffering, let us remember them in prayer, and pray together to Our Lady”.
After praying the “Hail Mary” for these abducted people with all those present in the square, the Pope concluded by commenting that today the Church celebrates the feast of Sts. Anne and Joachim, the parents of the Virgin Mary and therefore Jesus' grandparents. “On this occasion, I would like to greet all grandmothers and grandfathers, and to thank them for their valuable presence in families and for the new generations. Let us greet and applaud all those grandparents who are living, and also those who look upon us from Heaven”.
Pope's message to the new Patriarch of Cilicia of the Armenians
Vatican City, 27 July 2015 (VIS) – The Holy Father has granted ecclesiastical communion to His Beatitude Gregoire Pierre XX Ghabroyan, as requested by the latter following his election as Patriarch of Cilicia of the Armenians by the Synod of the Patriarchal Church on 24 July. The new patriarch succeeds His Beatitude Nerses Pierre XIX Tarmouni, who died on 25 June.
The Pope took the opportunity to send a message of congratulations to His Beatitude Gregoire Pierre XX Ghabroyan, in which he commented that his election comes at a moment when the Church faces new difficulties and challenges, especially the situation of many Armenian Catholic faithful in the Middle East. “However, illuminated by the light of faith in the Risen Christ, our outlook on the world is full of hope and mercy, for we are certain that the Cross of Jesus is the tree that gives life”.
“I am sure that Your Beatitude, in communion with the venerable Synod Fathers, with the help of the Holy Spirit and with evangelical wisdom, will know how to be the 'Pater et Caput”, the Good Shepherd to that part of the People of God entrusted to you. The many Armenian martyrs and St. Gregory of Narek, Doctor of the Church, will not fail to intercede on your behalf”.
Finally, the Pope entrusted the Patriarch and his ministry to Jesus Christ and to the protection of the Holy Mother of God, and imparted his apostolic benediction to all the Patriarchate.
Telegram for the death of Cardinal William Wakefield Baum
Vatican City, 25 July 2015 (VIS) – The Holy Father has sent a telegram of condolences to the cardinal archbishop of Washington, U.S.A., Donald Wuerl, for the death of Cardinal William Wakefield Baum, archbishop emeritus of the same archdiocese and major penitentiary emeritus, on 23 July at the age of 88.
In his text the Pope expresses his gratitude for the late cardinal's years of episcopal service in Springfield-Cape Girardeau and in Washington, and for his long service to the Apostolic See as Prefect of the Congregation for Catholic Education and major penitentiary. The Holy Father commends the late cardinal's soul to God, the Father of all mercies, and imparts his apostolic blessing to all who mourn his passing.
Cardinal Meisner, Pope's special envoy to the inauguration of the Maria Radna convent complex in Timisoara
Vatican City, 25 July 2015 (VIS) - In a letter published today, written in Latin and dated 20 May 2015, the Holy Father appointed Cardinal Joachim Meisner, archbishop emeritus of Cologne, Germany, as his special envoy to the inauguration of the convent complex at the Shrine of Maria Radna in Timisoara, Romania, to take place on 2 August, the day of the Portiuncula. In the text, the Pope mentions the fame of the Marian shrine, an ancient Franciscan convent, and expresses his pleasure at the restoration works, fruit of collaboration between the citizens of Timisoara, several dioceses in Germany, and the European Union.
Other Pontifical Acts
Vatican City, 25 July 2015 (VIS) – The Holy Father has:
- accepted the resignation from the pastoral care of the diocese of Tumaco, Colombia, presented by Bishop Gustavo Giron Higuita, O.C.D., upon reaching the age limit.
- appointed Cardinal Secretary of State Pietro Parolin as papal legate at the celebration of the fifth centenary of the evangelisation of East Timor, to be held in Dili, East Timor, on 15 August 2015.
- appointed Cardinal Angelo Scola, archbishop of Milan, Italy, as special envoy to the Mass to be held in Bobbio, Italy on 30 August, on the occasion of the Eighteenth Meeting of the Colombanian Community, on the 1400th anniversary of the death of St. Colombanus.
- appointed Cardinal Kurt Koch, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, as special envoy to the concluding celebrations of the 1500th anniversary of the founding of the Abbey of Saint-Maurice, Switzerland, to take place on 22 September 2015.

President Uhuru Kenyatta of #Kenya rejects Obama's attempts to change #Marriage


President Barack Obama is in Ethiopia Monday, the first sitting American president to visit East Africa. He's having talks with Ethiopian and African Union leaders on counterterrorism, human rights and regional security.
 Obama wrapped up a two-day visit to Kenya Sunday, where he urged leaders in his father's homeland to root out corruption, treat women and minorities as equals.
 But in an exchange, Kenya's president rejected Obama's message on gay rights, saying it was one value Christian Kenya does not share with the United States. "The fact of the matter is that Kenya, the United States, we share so many values, but there are some things that we must admit we don't share -- our culture, our society don't accept,"
President Uhuru Kenyatta said. "This is why I repeatedly say that for Kenyans today, the issue of gay rights is really a non-issue," he continued. "We want to focus on other areas that are day-to-day living for our people." In Kenya, homosexual relations carry a punishment of imprisonment. In this overwhelmingly Christian nation, many residents shrugged off the U.S. president's lecture on gay rights. "Of course, the way President Obama talked about gays and what have you, lesbianism or transgender, whatever, according to him, you know, we took him as an American. He was answering like an American,"
Nairobi resident Ibrahim Lincoln said. "But according to our African cultures, the Christian beliefs -- we say no." Shared from CBN

Evil Uncovered #PlannedParenthood Video exposes Baby Body Parts Selling as a Government funded Organization - Please PRAY


Your tax dollars fund Planned Parenthood. They also have Advocates for Youth, SIECUS which spent $1.7 billion in combined federal and state money. Planned Parenthood spent $1.5 billion of that money. Planned Parenthood is exposed in this second video haggling prices of baby body parts because the abortion chain kills 325,000+ innocent children in the womb yearly– almost 900 every day.Please PRAY for an end to Abortion. 

Operation Rescue Release: Washington, DC - The second video in an investigative series from the Center for Medical Progress exposing Planned Parenthood's illicit sale of aborted baby body parts has now been released.

The most recent video shows a luncheon conversation with Dr. Mary Gatter, who currently serves as President of Planned Parenthood's Medical Directors' Council and Medical Director of Planned Parenthood's Pasadena abortion clinic.  

In the video, Gatter is heard haggling over the price she will charge for intact fetal body parts and is concerned that she will be "low-balled." She asks for at least $75 per specimen, but wants to see what other Planned Parenthood abortionists are getting to make sure she gets similar compensation so she can buy an expensive sports car.

"It's been years since I've talked about compensation, so let me just figure out what others are getting and if this is in the ballpark, that's fine. If it's still low, we can bump it up. I want a Lamborghini," Gatter laughed.

"The statements in the Gatter video prove that Cecile Richards flat-out lied when she said that Planned Parenthood does not profit in any way from the sale of aborted baby parts. It takes a lot of baby livers to buy a Lamborghini," said Troy Newman, President of Operation Rescue. "And now it also appears that Planned Parenthood is also lying to women, altering their procedures in order to get body parts that can be sold for profit. These represent serious legal and ethical breeches for which Planned Parenthood must be held accountable."

Newman consulted on the undercover investigation conducted by David Daleiden, Director of the Center for Medical Progress for which Newman is a Board Member.

Gatter explains that she has no problem altering a procedure to one that is "less crunchy" ensure that the baby's body is as intact as possible, but also implies that they need to avoid the appearance - if not the fact - that they are selling the tissue.

Altering the abortion procedure to make sure organs are intact is considered unethical by medical standards and also illegal, which Gatter considers a "specious little argument."

"I don't think the patients would care one iota. So yeah, I'm not making a fuss about that," said Gatter 

Planned Parenthood Federation of America is well aware of each participating affiliate's organ procurement contract and approves each one.

Last week, the CMP released a video showing Planned Parenthood Medical Director Deborah Nucatola cavalierly discussing the sale of livers and other fetal organs obtained from altering late-second trimester abortion procedures. The video sparked a firestorm of outrage and prompted investigations into Planned Parenthood's sale of human fetal organs in Congress and seven states. Shared from Operation Rescue

Journey from Islam to Catholicism Amazing Story of a Young Woman's Courage to SHARE

Courage and Trust in God needed for Faith Journey from Islam to Catholicism

Catholic Communications, Sydney Archdiocese,
24 Jul 2015

25 year old Natasha Mohamad is writing a book about her faith journey
Natasha Mohamad grew up in a close-knit Muslim family. Her parents are from Syria and, like many in the now stricken country, are Alawite Muslims. But in her final year at high school her life changed forever and marked the beginning of a courageous and at times heart-wrenching journey of faith from Islam to Catholicism.
Now 25 with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Masters degree in Religious Education, Natasha says her Islamic upbringing is very much part of her and helped give her an even deeper understanding, love and commitment to the Catholic faith.
Natasha's faith journey began as a Year 12 student at Wiley Park Girls High School, Punchbowl. With Bible studies part of the school's personal development program, she attended the classes and was introduced to Jesus and the Gospels, the Old and New Testament.
"We had a wonderful teacher and she talked about Moses and together the class read the 10 Commandments. Growing up as a Muslim I had always believed in the 10 Commandments. They are part of the Quran. But that day was the first time I had ever heard the Commandments read in English," she says explaining that for Muslims the Quran is recited and read in Arabic.
Although she can read Arabic, Natasha was born and bred in Australia and as she points out, her first language is English.

Natasha was baptised by Father Remi Bui at Our Lady of Fatima, Kingswood on 23 April 2011
"My eyes were opened. The words spoke directly to me. I understood the nuances. I also realised for the first time that if everyone followed the 10 Commandments there'd be no wars, no poverty, and that we would all care and look after one another."
But it was study of the New Testament that had the biggest impact on Natasha.
"The Gospels are very different from the Quran. The fact that God gave the world his son, Jesus, and that through this one man the whole world could be redeemed because of God's love resonated with me and I think this is when my understanding of God began to change and evolve," she says.  .
Natasha studied the Gospels, highlighting and underlining favourite passages.
"Of all the passages I marked, my favourite is still Paul's letter to the Romans in the New Testament's Book of Romans. It is in this Epistle that St Paul explains that salvation is offered through the Gospel of Jesus Christ," she says.
Natasha continued her studies of the Scriptures during her time at the Australia Catholic University. Graduating with a BA in Theology with English as her major, she also became a Catechumen in preparation to being received into the Church and becoming a Catholic.

Natasha (in bright green jacket) with students pilgrims from Sydney's Catholic Schools in Lima in lead up to WYD13 in Rio
Baptised in 2011 by Father Remi Bui at Our Lady of Fatima, Kingsgrove, a day she says she will never forget, Natasha undertook the Rite of Election and the Scrutinies at Easter 2011 became a neophyte and official member of the Church.
Throughout this period she was supported by her long term boyfriend, David Di Benedetto and his Italian Catholic family. David's mother also acted as her sponsor. 
Natasha, however, kept the fact she was now Catholic from her own parents, brothers and sister.
"I was worried about how they would take it and afraid they would disown me," she says.
Despite Natasha attending Mass each week and joyously celebrating her faith among friends, the Di Benedetto family as well as her students at Marist College, Kogarah where she taught English and RE, her family had no idea their second eldest child was no longer Muslim. Nor did they suspect when Natasha led a group of eight pilgrims from the Kogarah College to World Youth Day in Rio in 2013.
"They knew I was going to Rio. They also knew how excited and enthusiastic I was about the fact the new Pope would be there. I think they just thought this was part of my job," she says.

Natasha graduated from ACU with a Masters in Religious Education in October last year
Her family had long known she taught RE as well as English and were there to see her graduate with a Masters in Religious Education in October last year, and to congratulate her when she took on her new role as English and RE teacher at St John Bosco College, Engadine.
But they had no idea that their second eldest child no longer shared the family faith and was now a deeply committed Catholic.
All that changed last week when Natasha finally found the courage to tell her family of her conversion to Catholicism and the central role her faith played in her life.
The reaction from her parents was one of shock. And as she had long feared, they have refused to accept her decision.
Her three brothers and sister followed their parents' example.
But despite Natasha's worst fears being realised, she firmly believes that once her family have had time to get their "heads around" what has happened, there will be a reconciliation and she will once again be a treasured much loved daughter and member of the close and loving family.
"I had more than five years to plan how I would tell them, and how important my faith is to my life. But unlike me, my family had no preparation for what I was telling them. So it's no wonder they were shocked. Their reaction is understandable," she says.

Natasha with WYD pilgrims from Marist College, Kogarah
Before telling her family, Natasha had been given support and wise counsel by Father Brendan Quirk from Mary MacKillop Parish, Rockdale whom she said helped prepare her for the reaction of her family, and accept whatever the reaction was.
Natasha strongly believes God has a plan for each of us. "You may not understand why something is happening now but you will over time," she insists.
Having kept her Catholic faith a secret from her family for so long, she says that along with the pain of being separated from her family, she also feels an immense sense of relief.
"Forgiveness is very much part of living the Gospel. Telling my family was difficult, but I don't resent them for their reaction. It was important I was upfront and honest with them. I've done my part, now it's up to God. It's in God's hands."
Natasha is currently writing a book about her faith journey.
Shared from Archdiocese of Sydney Australia

Today's Mass Readings and VIdeo : Mon. July 27, 2015


Monday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 401

Reading 1EX 32:15-24, 30-34

Moses turned and came down the mountain
with the two tablets of the commandments in his hands,
tablets that were written on both sides, front and back;
tablets that were made by God,
having inscriptions on them that were engraved by God himself.
Now, when Joshua heard the noise of the people shouting,
he said to Moses, “That sounds like a battle in the camp.”
But Moses answered, “It does not sound like cries of victory,
nor does it sound like cries of defeat;
the sounds that I hear are cries of revelry.”
As he drew near the camp, he saw the calf and the dancing.
With that, Moses’ wrath flared up, so that he threw the tablets down
and broke them on the base of the mountain.
Taking the calf they had made, he fused it in the fire
and then ground it down to powder,
which he scattered on the water and made the children of Israel drink.

Moses asked Aaron, “What did this people ever do to you
that you should lead them into so grave a sin?”
Aaron replied, “Let not my lord be angry.
You know well enough how prone the people are to evil.
They said to me, ‘Make us a god to be our leader;
as for the man Moses who brought us out of the land of Egypt,
we do not know what has happened to him.’
So I told them, ‘Let anyone who has gold jewelry take it off.’
They gave it to me, and I threw it into the fire, and this calf came out.”

On the next day Moses said to the people,
“You have committed a grave sin.
I will go up to the LORD, then;
perhaps I may be able to make atonement for your sin.”
So Moses went back to the LORD and said,
“Ah, this people has indeed committed a grave sin
in making a god of gold for themselves!
If you would only forgive their sin!
If you will not, then strike me out of the book that you have written.”
The LORD answered, “Him only who has sinned against me
will I strike out of my book.
Now, go and lead the people to the place I have told you.
My angel will go before you.
When it is time for me to punish, I will punish them for their sin.”

Responsorial PsalmPS 106:19-20, 21-22, 23

R. (1a) Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good.
Our fathers made a calf in Horeb
and adored a molten image;
They exchanged their glory
for the image of a grass-eating bullock.
R. Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good.
They forgot the God who had saved them,
who had done great deeds in Egypt,
Wondrous deeds in the land of Ham,
terrible things at the Red Sea.
R. Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good.
Then he spoke of exterminating them,
but Moses, his chosen one,
Withstood him in the breach
to turn back his destructive wrath.
R. Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good.

AlleluiaJAS 1:18

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
The Father willed to give us birth by the word of truth
that we may be a kind of firstfruits of his creatures.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMT 13:31-35

Jesus proposed a parable to the crowds.
“The Kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed
that a person took and sowed in a field.
It is the smallest of all the seeds,
yet when full-grown it is the largest of plants.
It becomes a large bush,
and the birds of the sky come and dwell in its branches.”

He spoke to them another parable.
“The Kingdom of heaven is like yeast
that a woman took and mixed with three measures of wheat flour
until the whole batch was leavened.”

All these things Jesus spoke to the crowds in parables.
He spoke to them only in parables,
to fulfill what had been said through the prophet:

I will open my mouth in parables,
I will announce what has lain hidden from the foundation of the world.