Sunday, June 12, 2016

Saint June 13 : St. Anthony of Padua : Patron of #Lost , Travellors, and #Sailors

St. Anthony of Padua
DOCTOR OF THE CHURCH
Feast: June 13

Information:
Feast Day:June 13
Born:
1195, Lisbon, Portugal
Died:13 June 1231, Padua
Canonized:
30 May 1232, Spoleto, Italy by Pope Gregory IX 
Major Shrine:Basilica of Saint Anthony of Padua in Padua, Italy
Patron of:animals; barrenness; Brazil; elderly people; faith in the Blessed Sacrament; fishermen; Franciscan Custody of the Holy Land; harvests; horses; Lisbon; lost articles; lower animals; mail; mariners; American Indians; oppressed people; Padua, Italy; poor people; Portugal; pregnant women; sailors; seekers of lost articles; shipwrecks; starvation; sterility; swineherds; Tigua Indians; travel hostesses; travellers; watermen
St. Anthony of Padua is one of the most famous disciples of St. Francis of Assisi. He was a famous preacher and worker of miracles in his own day, and throughout the eight centuries since his death he has so generously come to the assistance of the faithful who invoke him, that he is known throughout the world.
Novena http://jceworld.blogspot.ca/2014/06/novena-to-st-anthony-miracle-prayer.html
Free Movie on St. Anthony 
http://jceworld.blogspot.ca/2014/06/free-catholic-movie-st-anthony-warrior.html
St. Anthony's Youth & Conversion

St. Anthony was born in the year 1195 A. D. at Lisbon (Portugal) where his father was a captain in the royal army. Already at the age of fifteen years, he had entered the Congregation of Canons Regular of St. Augustine and devoted himself with great earnestness both to study and to the practice of piety in the Monastery at Coimbra (Portugal).

About that time some of the first members of the Order of Friars Minor, which St. Francis has founded in 1206 A. D. came to Coimbra. They begged from the Canons Regular a small and very poor place, from which by their evangelical poverty and simplicity they edified everyone in the region. Then in 1219 A. D. some of these friars, moved by divine inspiration, went as missionaries to preach the Gospel of Christ to the inhabitants of Morocco. There they were brutally martyred for the Faith. Some Christian merchants succeeded in recovering their remains; and so brought their relics in triumph back to Coimbra.
The relics of St. Bernard and companions, the first martyrs of the Franciscan Order, seized St. Anthony with an intense desire to suffer martyrdom in a like manner. So moved by their heroic example he repeatedly begged and petitioned his superiors to be given leave to join the Franciscan Order. In the quiet little Franciscan convent at Coimbra he received a friendly reception, and in the same year his earnest wish to be sent to the missions in Africa was fulfilled.

St. Anthony's Arrival in Italy

But God had decreed otherwise. And so, St. Anthony scarcely set foot on African soil when he was seized with a grievous illness. Even after recovering from it, he was so weak that, resigning himself to the will of God, he boarded a boat back to Portugal. Unexpectedly a storm came upon them and drove the ship to the east where it found refuge on coast of Sicily. St. Anthony was greeted and given shelter by the Franciscans of that island, and thus came to be sent to Assisi, where the general chapter of the Order was held in May, 1221 A. D..

Since he still looked weak and sickly, and gave no evidence of his scholarship, no one paid any attention to the stranger until Father Gratian, the Provincial of friars living in the region of Romagna (Italy), had compassion on him and sent him to the quiet little convent near Forli (also in Italy). There St. Anthony remained nine months as chaplain to the hermits, occupied in the lowliest duties of the kitchen and convent, and to his heart's content he practiced interior as well as exterior mortification.

St. Anthony, Preacher and Teacher

But the hidden jewel was soon to appear in all its brilliance. For the occasion of a ceremony of ordination some of the hermits along with St. Anthony were sent to the town of Forli. Before the ceremony was to begin, however, it was announced that the priest who was to give the sermon had fallen sick. The local superior, to avert the embarrassment of the moment, quickly asked the friars in attendance to volunteer. Each excused himself, saying that he was not prepared, until finally, St. Anthony was asked to give it. When he too, excused himself in a most humble manner, his superior ordered him by virtue of the  vow of obedience to give the sermon. St. Anthony began to speak in a very reserved manner; but soon holy animation seized him, and he spoke with such eloquence, learning and unction that everybody was fairly amazed.

When St. Francis was informed of the event, he gave St. Anthony the mission to preach throughout Italy. At the request of the brethren, St. Anthony was later commissioned also to teach theology, "but in such a manner," St. Francis distinctly wrote, " that the spirit of prayer be not extinguished either in yourself or in the other brethren." St. Anthony himself placed greater value in the salvation of souls than on learning. For that reason he never ceased to exercise his office as preacher despite his work of teaching.

The number of those who came to hear him was sometimes so great that no church was large enough to accommodate and so he had to preach in the open air. Frequently St. Anthony wrought veritable miracles of conversion. Deadly enemies were reconciled. Thieves and usurers made restitution. Calumniators and detractors recanted and apologized. He was so energetic in defending the truths of the Catholic Faith that many heretics returned to the Church. This occasioned the epitaph given him by Pope Gregory IX "the ark of the covenant."

In all his labors he never forgot the admonition of his spiritual father, St. Francis, that the spirit of prayer must not be extinguished. If he spent the day in teaching and heard the confession of sinners till late in the evening, then many hours of the night were spent in intimate union with God.

Once a man, at whose home St. Anthony was spending the night, came upon the saint and found him holding in his arms the Child Jesus, unspeakably beautiful and surrounded with heavenly light. For this reason St. Anthony is often depicted holding the Child Jesus.

St. Anthony's Death

In 1227 A. D., St. Anthony was elected Minister Provincial of the friars living in northern Italy. Thus he resumed the work of preaching. Due to his taxing labors and his austere penance, he soon felt his strength so spent that he prepared himself for death. After receiving the last sacraments he kept looking upward with a smile on his countenance. When he was asked what he saw there, he answered: "I see my Lord." He breathed forth his soul on June 13, 1231 A. D., being only thirty six year old. Soon the children in the streets of the city of Padua were crying: "The saint is dead, Anthony is dead."

Pope Gregory IX enrolled him among the saints in the very next year. At Padua, a magnificent basilica was built in his honor, his holy relics were entombed there in 1263 A. D. From the time of his death up to the present day, countless miracles have occurred through St. Anthony's intercession, so that he is known as the Wonder-Worker. In 1946 A. D. St. Anthony was declared a Doctor of the Church.
(Taken from the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate)

For More Breaking News, Novena Prayers,  and Free Catholic Movies LIKE http://fb.com/catholicnewsworld 

#Breaking Pope Francis in Prayer for victims of Orlando Shooting - OFFICIAL Release by Vatican

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis is shaken and saddened by the ‘homicidal folly and senseless hatred’ that has left at least 50 people dead in an attack on a nightclub in Orlando, Florida. 
A statement released  by the Holy See Press Office Director, Father Federico Lombardi SJ, on the Orlando massacre which has been described as the worst mass shooting in American history.
Please find below Vatican Radio’s translation of the statement:
The terrible massacre that has taken place in Orlando, with its dreadfully high number of innocent victims, has caused in Pope Francis, and in all of us, the deepest feelings of horror and condemnation, of pain and turmoil before this new manifestation of homicidal folly and senseless hatred. Pope Francis joins the families of the victims and all of the injured in prayer and in compassion. Sharing in their indescribable suffering he entrusts them to the Lord so they may find comfort. We all hope that ways may be found, as soon as possible, to effectively identify and contrast the causes of such terrible and absurd violence which so deeply upsets the desire for peace of the American people and of the whole of humanity. 
The attack, which took place early Sunday in a crowded nightclub, was perpetrated by a gunman wielding an assault-type rifle and a handgun.

Authorities are reportedly investigating the attack as an act of terrorism. Text Shared from Vatican Radio
Officials said at least 53 other people were hospitalized, most in critical condition. A surgeon at Orlando Regional Medical Center said the death toll was likely to climb.

#PopeFrancis "Jesus is the physician who heals with the medicine of love" FULL TEXT Holy Mass for Disabled with Video

Holy Mass  on Sunday in St. Peter's Square for the Jubilee of the Sick and Disabled,
 Please find below the full text of Pope Francis’ Homily:
    “I have been crucified with Christ; it is no longer I who live, but it is Christ who lives in me” (Gal 2:19).  In these words, the Apostle Paul powerfully expresses the mystery of the Christian life, which can be summed up in the paschal dynamic of death and resurrection received at baptism.  Indeed, through immersion in water, each of us, as it were, dies and is buried with Christ (cf. Rom 6:3-4), and remerging, shows forth new life in the Holy Spirit.  This rebirth embraces every aspect of our lives: even sickness, suffering and death are taken up in Christ and in him find their ultimate meaning.  Today, on the Jubilee day devoted to the sick and bearers of disabilities, this word of life has a special resonance for our assembly.
    Each of us, sooner or later, is called to face – at times painfully – frailty and illness, both our own and those of others.  How many different faces do these common yet dramatically human experiences take!  Yet all of them directly raise the pressing question of the meaning of life.  Our hearts may quietly yield to cynicism, as if the only solution were simply to put up with these experiences, trusting only in our own strength.  Or we may put complete trust in science, thinking that surely somewhere in the world there is a medicine capable of curing the illness.  Sadly, however, this is not always the case, and, even if the medicine did exist, it would be accessible to very few people.     Human nature, wounded by sin, is marked by limitations.  We are familiar with the objections raised, especially nowadays, to a life characterized by serious physical limitations.  It is thought that sick or disabled persons cannot be happy, since they cannot live the lifestyle held up by the culture of pleasure and entertainment.  In an age when care for one’s body has become an obsession and a big business, anything imperfect has to be hidden away, since it threatens the happiness and serenity of the privileged few and endangers the dominant model.  Such persons should best be kept apart, in some “enclosure” – even a gilded one – or in “islands” of pietism or social welfare, so that they do not hold back the pace of a false well-being.  In some cases, we are even told that it is better to eliminate them as soon as possible, because they become an unacceptable economic burden in time of crisis.  Yet what an illusion it is when people today shut their eyes in the face of sickness and disability!  They fail to understand the real meaning of life, which also has to do with accepting suffering and limitations.  The world does not become better because only apparently “perfect” people live there – I say “perfect” rather than “false” – but when human solidarity, mutual acceptance and respect increase.  How true are the words of the Apostle: “God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong” (1 Cor 1:27)!
    This Sunday’s Gospel (Lk 7:36-8:3) presents us with a specific situation of weakness.  The woman caught in sin is judged and rejected, yet Jesus accepts and defends her: “She has shown great love” (7:47).  This is the conclusion of Jesus, who is attentive to her suffering and her plea.  This tenderness is a sign of the love that God shows to those who suffer and are cast aside.  Suffering need not only be physical; one of today’s most frequent pathologies is also spiritual.  It is a suffering of the heart; it causes sadness for lack of love. It is the pathology of sadness.  When we experience disappointment or betrayal in important relationships, we come to realize how vulnerable and defenceless we are.  The temptation to become self-absorbed grows stronger, and we risk losing life’s greatest opportunity: to love in spite of everything!
    The happiness that everyone desires, for that matter, can be expressed in any number of ways and attained only if we are capable of loving.  This is the way.  It is always a matter of love; there is no other path.  The true challenge is that of who loves the most.  How many disabled and suffering persons open their hearts to life again as soon as they realize they are loved!  How much love can well up in a heart simply with a smile!  The therapy of smiling.  Then our frailness itself can become a source of consolation and support in our solitude.  Jesus, in his passion, loved us to the end (cf. Jn  13:1); on the cross he revealed the love that bestows itself without limits.  Can we reproach God for our infirmities and sufferings when we realize how much suffering shows on the face of his crucified Son?  His physical pain was accompanied by mockery, condescension and scorn, yet he responds with a mercy that accepts and forgives everything: “by his wounds we are healed” (Is 53:5; 1 Pet 2:24).  Jesus is the physician who heals with the medicine of love, for he takes upon himself our suffering and redeems it.  We know that God can understand our infirmities, because he himself has personally experienced them (cf. Heb 4:15).
    The way we experience illness and disability is an index of the love we are ready to offer.  The way we face suffering and limitation is the measure of our freedom to give meaning to life’s experiences, even when they strike us as meaningless and unmerited.  Let us not be disturbed, then, by these tribulations (cf. 1 Th 3:3).  We know that in weakness we can become strong (cf. 2 Cor 12:10) and receive the grace to fill up what is lacking in the sufferings of Christ for his body, the Church (cf. Col  1:24). For that body, in the image of the risen Lord’s own, keeps its wounds, the mark of a hard struggle, but they are wounds transfigured for ever by love.   

#BreakingNews 50 Killed at Gay NightClub in Orlando, Florida by Muslim Extremist - Please PRAY

 Fifty killed in Orlando gay nightclub shooting on Sunday June 12, 2016. A "state of emergency" has been declared.  The gunman, Omar Mateen, was killed after taking hostages. Another 53 people were injured in the shooting at the Pulse club. The suspect, comes from the Florida town of Port St Lucie and is of Afghan descent. The death toll given by Mayor Dyer who said, "Today we're dealing with something that we never imagined and is unimaginable," he said, adding there was "an enormous amount of havoc" and "blood everywhere".  Orlando Police Chief John Mina said the attack began at 02:00 (06:00 GMT). After this a "hostage situation" unfolded, he said. Chief Mina. "Our Swat officers exchanged gunfire with the suspect, the suspect is dead," he said. "He appeared to be carrying an assault-type rifle and a handgun." A bomb squad robot has been searching the scene.Orlando had just suffered a fatal shooting on Friday night of 22-year-old singer Christina Grimmie following a concert in the city. Please PRAY for the victims souls and their Families....

#PopeFrancis "May the Virgin Mary, to whom we now turn in prayer, always accompany us..." Angelus FULL TEXT


Before the Angelus:
Dear Brothers and Sisters!
Yesterday, in Vercelli, the priest Giacomo Abbondo, who lived in the eighteenth century, was beatified. He was in love with God, educated, and always available for his parishioners. We share the joy and thanksgiving of the Diocese of Vercelli. And also that of Diocese of Monreale, where today Sister Carolina Santocanale, founder of the Capuchin Sisters of the Immaculate of Lourdes, was beatified. Born into a noble family in Palermo, she gave up her comforts and became poor among the poor. By Christ, especially in the Eucharist, she drew the strength for her spiritual motherhood and her tenderness with the weakest.
In the context of the Jubilee for the Sick, in recent days, an international conference dedicated to caring for those suffering from Hansen’s Disease took place in Rome. With gratitude, I greet the organizers and participants and hope for a fruitful commitment in the struggle against this disease.
Today is the World Day Against Child Labour. Altogether, let’s renew our efforts to remove the causes of this modern slavery, depriving millions of children of certain fundamental rights and exposing them to serious dangers. In the world today there are so many child slaves!
I affectionately greet all the pilgrims who came from Italy and various countries for this Jubilee Day. I especially thank you who have wanted to be present in your state of illness or disability. My heartfelt thanks also go to doctors and health professionals who, in the “Health points” set up at the four papal basilicas, are offering specialized visits to hundreds of people living on the peripheries of the city of Rome. Many thanks to you!
May the Virgin Mary, to whom we now turn in prayer, always accompany us along our way.
Angelus Domini …
[Original text: Italian] [Translation by Deborah Castellano Lubov]

Sunday Mass Online : Sun. June 12, 2016 - 11th of Ordinary Time - C


Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 93


Reading 12 SM 12:7-10, 13

Nathan said to David:
“Thus says the LORD God of Israel:
‘I anointed you king of Israel.
I rescued you from the hand of Saul.
I gave you your lord’s house and your lord’s wives for your own.
I gave you the house of Israel and of Judah.
And if this were not enough, I could count up for you still more.
Why have you rejected the LORD and done evil in his sight?
You have cut down Uriah the Hittite with the sword;
you took his wife as your own,
and him you killed with the sword of the Ammonites.
Now, therefore, the sword shall never depart from your house,
because you have looked down on me
and have taken the wife of Uriah to be your wife.’”

Then David said to Nathan,
“I have sinned against the LORD.”
Nathan answered David:
“The LORD on his part has forgiven your sin:
you shall not die.”

Responsorial PsalmPS 32:1-2, 5, 7, 11

R. (cf. 5c) Lord, forgive the wrong I have done.
Blessed is the one whose fault is taken away,
whose sin is covered.
Blessed the man to whom the LORD imputes not guilt,
in whose spirit there is no guile.
R. Lord, forgive the wrong I have done.
I acknowledged my sin to you,
my guilt I covered not.
I said, "I confess my faults to the LORD,"
and you took away the guilt of my sin.
R. Lord, forgive the wrong I have done.
You are my shelter; from distress you will preserve me;
with glad cries of freedom you will ring me round.
R. Lord, forgive the wrong I have done.
Be glad in the LORD and rejoice, you just;
exult, all you upright of heart.
R. Lord, forgive the wrong I have done.

Reading 2GAL 2:16, 19-21

Brothers and sisters:
We who know that a person is not justified by works of the law
but through faith in Jesus Christ,
even we have believed in Christ Jesus
that we may be justified by faith in Christ
and not by works of the law,
because by works of the law no one will be justified.
For through the law I died to the law,
that I might live for God.
I have been crucified with Christ;
yet I live, no longer I, but Christ lives in me;
insofar as I now live in the flesh,
I live by faith in the Son of God
who has loved me and given himself up for me.
I do not nullify the grace of God;
for if justification comes through the law,
then Christ died for nothing.

Alleluia1 JN 4:10B

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
God loved us and sent his Son
as expiation for our sins.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelLK 7:36—8:3

A Pharisee invited Jesus to dine with him,
and he entered the Pharisee's house and reclined at table.
Now there was a sinful woman in the city
who learned that he was at table in the house of the Pharisee.
Bringing an alabaster flask of ointment,
she stood behind him at his feet weeping
and began to bathe his feet with her tears.
Then she wiped them with her hair,
kissed them, and anointed them with the ointment.
When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this he said to himself,
"If this man were a prophet,
he would know who and what sort of woman this is who is touching him,
that she is a sinner."
Jesus said to him in reply,
"Simon, I have something to say to you."
"Tell me, teacher," he said.
"Two people were in debt to a certain creditor;
one owed five hundred days' wages and the other owed fifty.
Since they were unable to repay the debt, he forgave it for both.
Which of them will love him more?"
Simon said in reply,
"The one, I suppose, whose larger debt was forgiven."
He said to him, "You have judged rightly."

Then he turned to the woman and said to Simon,
"Do you see this woman?
When I entered your house, you did not give me water for my feet,
but she has bathed them with her tears
and wiped them with her hair.
You did not give me a kiss,
but she has not ceased kissing my feet since the time I entered.
You did not anoint my head with oil,
but she anointed my feet with ointment.
So I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven
because she has shown great love.
But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little."
He said to her, "Your sins are forgiven."
The others at table said to themselves,
"Who is this who even forgives sins?"
But he said to the woman,
"Your faith has saved you; go in peace."

Afterward he journeyed from one town and village to another,
preaching and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God.
Accompanying him were the Twelve
and some women who had been cured of evil spirits and infirmities,
Mary, called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out,
Joanna, the wife of Herod's steward Chuza,
Susanna, and many others who provided for them
out of their resources.

OrLK 7:36-50

A Pharisee invited Jesus to dine with him,
and he entered the Pharisee's house and reclined at table.
Now there was a sinful woman in the city
who learned that he was at table in the house of the Pharisee.
Bringing an alabaster flask of ointment,
she stood behind him at his feet weeping
and began to bathe his feet with her tears.
Then she wiped them with her hair,
kissed them, and anointed them with the ointment.
When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this he said to himself,
"If this man were a prophet,
he would know who and what sort of woman this is who is touching him,
that she is a sinner."
Jesus said to him in reply,
"Simon, I have something to say to you."
"Tell me, teacher," he said.
"Two people were in debt to a certain creditor;
one owed five hundred day's wages and the other owed fifty.
Since they were unable to repay the debt, he forgave it for both.
Which of them will love him more?"
Simon said in reply,
"The one, I suppose, whose larger debt was forgiven."
He said to him, "You have judged rightly."

Then he turned to the woman and said to Simon,
"Do you see this woman?
When I entered your house, you did not give me water for my feet,
but she has bathed them with her tears
and wiped them with her hair.
You did not give me a kiss,
but she has not ceased kissing my feet since the time I entered.
You did not anoint my head with oil,
but she anointed my feet with ointment.
So I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven
because she has shown great love.
But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little."
He said to her, "Your sins are forgiven."
The others at table said to themselves,
"Who is this who even forgives sins?"
But he said to the woman,
"Your faith has saved you; go in peace."