Monday, October 10, 2016

Saint October 11 : Saint John XXIII : #Pope : Patron of #ChristianUnity





Saint Pope JOHN XXIII

1958-1963

Vatican.va Release: When on October 20, 1958 the cardinals, assembled in conclave, elected Angelo Roncalli as pope many regarded him, because of his age and ambiguous reputation, as a transitional pope, little realizing that the pontificate of this man of 76 years would mark a turning point in history and initiate a new age for the Church. He took the name of John in honor of the precursor and the beloved disciple—but also because it was the name of a long line of popes whose pontificates had been short.
Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli, the third of thirteen children, was born on November 25, 1881 at Sotto il Monte (Bergamo) of a family of sharecroppers. He attended elementary school in the town, was tutored by a priest of Carvico, and at the age of twelve entered the seminary at Bergamo. A scholarship from the Cerasoli Foundation (1901) enabled him to go on to the Apollinaris in Rome where he studied under (among others) Umberto Benigni, the Church historian. He interrupted his studies for service in the Italian Army but returned to the seminary, completed his work for a doctorate in theology, and was ordained in 1904. Continuing his studies in canon law he was appointed secretary to the new bishop of Bergamo, Giacomo Radini-Tedeschi. Angelo served this social-minded prelate for nine years, acquiring first-hand experience and a broad understanding of the problems of the working class. He also taught apologetics, church history, and patrology.
With the entry of Italy into World War I in 1915 he was recalled to military service as a chaplain. On leaving the service in 1918 he was appointed spiritual director of the seminary, but found time to open a hostel for students in Bergamo. It was at this time also that he began the research for a multi-volume work on the episcopal visitation of Bergamo by St. Charles Borromeo, the last volume of which was published after his elevation as pope.
In 1921 he was called to Rome to reorganize the Society for the Propagation of the Faith. Nominated titular archbishop of Areopolis and apostolic visitator to Bulgaria (1925), he immediately concerned himself with the problems of the Eastern Churches. Transferred in 1934 to Turkey and Greece as apostolic delegate, he set up an office in Istanbul for locating prisoners of war. In 1944 he was appointed nuncio to Paris to assist in the Church's post-war efforts in France, and became the first permanent observer of the Holy See at UNESCO, addressing its sixth and seventh general assemblies in 1951 and 1952. In 1953 he became cardinal-patriarch of Venice, and expected to spend his last years there in pastoral work. He was correcting proofs of the synodal Acts of his first diocesan Synod (1958) when he was called to Rome to participate in the conclave that elected him pope.
In his first public address Pope John expressed his concern for reunion with separated Christians and for world peace. In his coronation address he asserted "vigorously and sincerely" that it was his intention to be a pastoral pope since "all other human gifts and accomplishments—learning, practical experience, diplomatic finesse—can broaden and enrich pastoral work but they cannot replace it." One of his first acts was to annul the regulation of Sixtus IV limiting the membership of the College of Cardinals to 70; within the next four years he enlarged it to 87 with the largest international representation in history. Less than three months after his election he announced that he would hold a diocesan synod for Rome, convoke an ecumenical council for the universal Church, and revise the Code of Canon Law. The synod, the first in the history of Rome, was held in 1960; Vatican Council II was convoked in 1962; and the Pontifical Commission for the Revision of the Code was appointed in 1963.
His progressive encyclical, Mater et Magistra, was issued in 1961 to commemorate the anniversary of Leo XIII's Rerum novarumPacem in terris, advocating human freedom and dignity as the basis for world order and peace, came out in 1963. He elevated the Pontifical Commission for Cinema, Radio, and Television to curial status, approved a new code of rubrics for the Breviary and Missal, made notable advances in ecumenical relations by creating a new Secretariat for Promoting Christian Unity and by appointing the first representative to the Assembly of the World Council of Churches held in New Delhi (1961). In 1960 he consecrated fourteen bishops for Asia, Africa, and Oceania. The International Balzan Foundation awarded him its Peace Prize in 1962.
Since his death on June 3, 1963, much has been written and spoken about the warmth and holiness of the beloved Pope John. Perhaps the testimony of the world was best expressed by a newspaper drawing of the earth shrouded in mourning with the simple caption, "A Death in the Family."
 Official Prayer to St. John XXIII Dear Pope John, Your simplicity and meekness carried the scent of God and sparked in people’s hearts the desire for goodness. You spoke often of the beauty of the family gathered around the table to share bread and faith: pray for us that once again true families would live in our homes. With outstretched hands you sowed hope, and you taught us to listen for God’s footsteps as he prepares a new humanity: help us have a healthy optimism of defeating evil with good. You loved the world with its light and darkness, and you believed that peace is possible: help us be instruments of peace at home and in our communities. With paternal gentleness you gave all children a caress: you moved the world and reminded us that hands have been given to us not for striking, but for embracing and drying tears. Pray for us so that we do not limit ourselves to cursing the darkness but that we bring the light, bringing Jesus everywhere and always praying to Mary. Amen.

#PopeFrancis “Contemplating the life of Jesus and looking at our life as pilgrims..."

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Monday greeted members of the General Assembly of the Pallotine Fathers.
Pope Francis spoke of the charism of St. Vincent Pallotti, who founded the order in Rome in 1835, saying he was “blessed to recognize that Jesus is the Apostle of the Father - rich in mercy and full of mercy - [Christ] is the one who fulfills his mission by revealing to everyone the tender love and the infinite mercy of the Father.”
“Contemplating the life of Jesus and looking at our life as pilgrims in this world with its many challenges, we feel the necessity of a profound conversion and the urgency of reviving faith in Him,” – Pope Francis said – “This is the only way we can serve our neighbor in charity! Every day we are called to renew our trust in Christ and from his life draw inspiration to fulfill our mission because ‘Jesus is the first and greatest evangelizer. In every activity of evangelization, the primacy always belongs to God, who has called us to cooperate with him and who leads us on by the power of his Spirit.’” [Evangelii gaudium, 12).
The Holy Father urged the Pallotine Fathers to “continue with joy and hope on your path, engaging yourselves with all your heart and all your strength, so the charism of your Founder bears abundant fruit also in our time.”
“St. Vincent Pallotti liked to repeat that the call of the apostolate is not reserved to some, but is addressed to everyone, ‘regardless of their status, their condition, their profession, their fortune, all are able to take part,’” Pope Francis said.
Pope Francis then spoke of the Union of Catholic Apostolate (UAC), which fosters apostolic works in dioceses around the world. The UAC was also founded by St. Vincent Pallotti, and is under the pastoral care of the Pallotine Fathers.
The Pope said the apostolate “offers many spaces and opens new horizons to participate in the mission of the Church,” adding he was familiar with the UAC during his time in Argentina, and has fond memories of them.
Pope Francis called on them to work with “renewed vigour to reawaken faith and rekindle charity, especially among the most vulnerable segments of the population, the materially and spiritually poor.”

Free Catholic Movie : The Staircase : Based on a True Story - Stars Barbara Hershey


The Staircase (1998) TV Movie | 96 min | Drama, Western | 12 April 1998 (USA)  A small chapel's choir loft survives incomplete with no staircase, until one day a mysterious drifter, with a background in carpentry, arrives in town. Director: Karen Arthur Writer: Christopher Lofton Stars: Barbara Hershey, William Petersen, Diane Ladd

#BreakingNews half Naked Women attack group Praying the Rosary at Cathedral in Argentina

The 31st National Women’s Summit (ENM) ended in rubber bullets and tear gas.16 people were hurt after police fired rubber bullets and tear gas at the protesters in front of the city’s Cathedral,  in Rosario, Santa Fe province. The incidents happened at 10 PM and several women were arrested. A group of male Catholics were praying  in front of the Cathedral, which was sealed off from the public. A group of demonstrators broke off from the main column of the ENM march of around 70,000 participants. The demonstrators demanded legalized abortion, an end to human trafficking. The group broke off from the demonstration started throwing things (bottles and stones) at the fence surrounding the Cathedral. Many people were hurt including several journalists who were hit with rubber bullets to the face and head. 10 police officers were treated for injuries sustained from projectiles and six people for injuries caused by rubber bullets and breathing difficulties from the gas.  “There were two policemen on either side of the Cathedral but when they started throwing things, they came out of the church and started firing,” said one witness. The Archbishop of Rosario, Eduardo Martin tried to distance himself from the praying counterprotesters, saying he “does not know any of them personally” and thinks that “they came from outside Rosario.” This is not the first time that the ENM has seen violence and controversy. In the march in Mar del Plata last year, violence also broke out in front of the city’s Cathedral. Edited from The Bubble

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Mon. October 10, 2016


Monday of the Twenty-eighth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 467


Reading 1GAL 4:22-24, 26-27, 31–5:1

Brothers and sisters:
It is written that Abraham had two sons,
one by the slave woman and the other by the freeborn woman.
The son of the slave woman was born naturally,
the son of the freeborn through a promise.
Now this is an allegory.
These women represent two covenants.
One was from Mount Sinai, bearing children for slavery;
this is Hagar.
But the Jerusalem above is freeborn, and she is our mother.
For it is written:
Rejoice, you barren one who bore no children;
break forth and shout, you who were not in labor;
for more numerous are the children of the deserted one
than of her who has a husband.

Therefore, brothers and sisters,
we are children not of the slave woman
but of the freeborn woman.

For freedom Christ set us free; so stand firm
and do not submit again to the yoke of slavery.

Responsorial PsalmPS 113:1B-2, 3-4, 5A AND 6-7

R. (see 2) Blessed be the name of the Lord forever.
or:
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Praise, you servants of the LORD,
praise the name of the LORD.
Blessed be the name of the LORD
both now and forever.
R. Blessed be the name of the Lord forever.
or:
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
From the rising to the setting of the sun
is the name of the LORD to be praised.
High above all nations is the LORD;
above the heavens is his glory.
R. Blessed be the name of the Lord forever.
or:
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Who is like the LORD, our God,
who looks upon the heavens and the earth below?
He raises up the lowly from the dust;
from the dunghill he lifts up the poor.
R. Blessed be the name of the Lord forever.
or:
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

AlleluiaPS 95:8

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
If today you hear his voice,
harden not your hearts.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelLK 11:29-32

While still more people gathered in the crowd, Jesus said to them,
“This generation is an evil generation;
it seeks a sign, but no sign will be given it,
except the sign of Jonah.
Just as Jonah became a sign to the Ninevites,
so will the Son of Man be to this generation.
At the judgment
the queen of the south will rise with the men of this generation
and she will condemn them,
because she came from the ends of the earth
to hear the wisdom of Solomon,
and there is something greater than Solomon here.
At the judgment the men of Nineveh will arise with this generation
and condemn it,
because at the preaching of Jonah they repented,
and there is something greater than Jonah here.”