Monday, November 28, 2016

Saint November 29 : St. Saturninus : #Missionary and Martyr

MISSIONARY AND MARTYR Feast: November 29
Born:
third century, Patras, Greece
Died:
257, Toulouse, France
Canonized:
Basilique St-Sernin, Toulouse
Patron of:
Toulouse, France

St. Saturninus was, says Tillemont, one of the most illustrious martyrs France has given to the Church. We possess only his Acts, which are very old, since they were utilized by St. Gregory of Tours. He was the first bishop of Toulouse, whither he went during the consulate of Decius and Gratus (250). Whether there were already Christians in the town or his preaching made numerous conversions, he soon had a little church. To reach it he had to pass before the capitol where there was a a temple, and according to the Acts, the pagan priests ascribed to his frequent passings the silence of their oracles. One day they seized him and on his unshakeable refusal to sacrifice to the idols they condemned him be tied by the feet to a bull which dragged him about the town until the rope broke. Two Christian women piously gathered up the remains and buried them in a deep ditch, that they might not be profaned by the pagans. His successors, Sts. Hilary and Exuperius, gave him more honourable burial. A church was erected where the bull stopped. It still exists, and is called the church of the Taur (the bull). The body of the saint was transferred at an early date and is still preserved in the Church of St. Sernin (or Saturninus), one of the most ancient and beautiful of Southern France. His feast was entered on the Hieronymian Martyrology for 29 November; his cult spread abroad. The account of his Acts was embellished with several details, and legends linked his name with the beginning of the churches of Eauze, Auch, Pamplona, and Amiens, but these are without historic foundations.

#ProLife matters "...complete and total lack of understanding of the pro-life side of the argument." a Case from #PEI in Canada



The Prince Edward Island government announced that it would

provide abortions in a hospital setting on the island by the end of this calendar year. Already

since the announcement we have heard sighs of relief from the pro-choice contingency in the

province, citing this decision as the end of the abortion debate - at least on the island. But declaring the abortion debate as over is jumping the gun. Certainly legal decisions (ought to) 
have little to no effect on a people’s moral discussion, but are rather (in theory) the result of

them. If those who welcome the province’s recent announcement expect the pro-life group on the island to throw up their hands and call it a day, it only shows their complete and total lack of understanding of the pro-life side of the argument. Moral debates are only over when there are

none left to argue. And given the fact that the island currently has its fair share of pro-life and pro-choice proponents, the debate is far from over.

In this debate, pro-choicers often accuse their opponents of disrespecting female rights. Women are claimed to have been denied the fundamental right to choose what to do with their own bodies. But of course, rights have limits. This right to do with our bodies what we choose is limited by other rights. These limiting rights include the wellbeing of others and of their property. For example, I do not have the right to choose to, with my own body, harm and kill another innocent human being.

But this isn’t being completely honest. In Canada, I do have the legal right, if I am a pregnant woman, to harm and kill my innocent preborn human child if I so choose to, or to have some other qualified person do so - that is, currently no law prohibits my seeking out and obtaining an abortion (at any stage of my pregnancy). 
But this legal right in no way translates into a moral right, nor can it ever. 

We are talking about government sponsored killing of innocent human

beings. Can such a thing ever be anything but totally and completely morally repulsive?

Some will object here that the preborn child is not a human being at all. What then is it? The fetus has a complete and unique genetic makeup, wholly distinct and apart from both of its parents from the point of conception onwards. Common sense and basic elementary school level science tell us that the fetus is of the human species - or do we wait to see if it is a giraffe, mosquito, or some new and previously undiscovered species? Humans beget humans, and the human fetus is a unique, living, growing, and fundamentally human organism. Humans do not beget tumors or anything tumor-like which transubstantiate into human beings upon birth.

Humans beget other humans, wanted or not, who have a physical body distinct from the mother, 
and who, by the very fact of their humanity, deserve for their human rights to be legally and
morally recognized and protected.

Still, pro-choicers want female rights protected at the expense of the preborn humans, who, I might add, are more often than not female themselves. Who will speak up for the preborn

female’s human right to life? Who will speak up for the preborn male’s human right to life? On Prince Edward Island, we will soon have to live with the knowledge that innocent and vulnerable human beings are being killed on our own island while a very vocal group cheers on and the dirt grows redder. Whatever happened to our gentle island?

Since the original publication of this article, the Prince Edward Island government has

announced that the abortion clinic will be opened in Summerside, PE at a cost of $5.35 million to the province. The new clinic, which is an expansion on an existing hospital, is expected to be fully functional in the next year and a half, with certain services being offered as early as January 2017. By some estimates, it is expected to provide around 100 abortions per year.
By: René Fehr is a Pro-Life Masters' Student at Dominican University College in Ottawa and grew up in Prince Edward Island.
The following is a version of an article that originally appeared in Prince Edward Island’s

newspaper The Guardian on April 28 2016, authored by René Ardell Fehr under the pseudonym Thomas Curry.

#PopeFrancis "..Liturgy points out three attitudes: vigilance in prayer, industriousness in charity, and exultant..." #Homily for #Advent


Vatican Radio) The Christian faith is not a theory or a philosophy – it is the encounter with Jesus. That was the message of Pope Francis at the morning Mass at the Casa Santa Marta at the beginning of Advent. The Pope emphasized that in order to truly encounter Jesus we undertake the journey with three attitudes: vigilant in prayer, industrious in charity, exultant in praise.
Encountering Jesus: this is “the grace that we desire in Advent.” Pope Francis centred the homily for the Holy Mass on the theme of the encounter with the Lord. He noted first that in this period of the year, the Liturgy shows us many encounters with Jesus: with His Mother in the womb, with Saint John the Baptist, with the Shepherds, with the Magi. All this, he said, shows us that Advent is “a time for journeying and going forth to meet the Lord, that is, a time to not stand still."
Prayer, charity, and praise: how we encounter the Lord
And so we must ask ourselves how we can go forth to meet Jesus. “What are the attitudes that I must have in order to encounter the Lord?” How, the Pope asks, “must I prepare my heart for the encounter with the Lord?”
In the prayer at the beginning of the Mass, the Liturgy points out three attitudes: vigilance in prayer, industriousness in charity, and exultant in praise. That is, I must pray, with vigilance. I must be hardworking in charity – fraternal charity, not only giving alms, no; but being tolerant of the people who annoy me, being tolerant at home of the children when they make too much noise; or of the husband or wife when they are difficult; or the mother-in-law… I don’t know… but tolerant: tolerant… charity, always, but hard-working. And also the joy of praising the Lord: ‘Exulting in joy.’ That is how we must live this journey, this desire to encounter the Lord. To encounter Him in a good way. Not standing still. And we will encounter the Lord.
However, the Pope added, “there will be a surprise, because He is the Lord of surprises.” The Lord, too, “does not stand still.” “I am on a journey to encounter Him, and He is on a journey to encounter me, and when we meet one another we see that the great surprise is that He was seeking me before I began to seek Him.”
The Lord always goes before us in the encounter
Pope Francis said that this “is the great surprise of the encounter with the Lord: He sought us first. He is always first. He makes His journey in order to find us.” That is what happened with the Centurion:
The Lord always goes beyond, goes first. We take one step and He takes ten. Always. The abundance of grace, of His love, of His tenderness that never tires of seeking us. Even, at times, with small things: We think that encountering the Lord would be something magnificent, like that man of Syria, Naaman, who was a leper [did]. And it’s not simple… And he too had a great surprise at God’s way of acting. And our God is the God of surprises, the God that is seeking us, is awaiting us, and asks of us only the little step of good will.
We must have the “desire to encounter Him,” the Pope continued. And then He “helps us.” The Lord, he said, “will accompany us during our life. Although many times, perhaps, we seem to be far from Him, “He waits for us like the father of the prodigal son.”
Faith does not consist in knowing dogmas, but in encountering Jesus
“Often times,” he added, “He sees that we want to draw close, and He comes out to meet us. It is the encounter with the Lord: This is the important thing! The encounter.” Pope Francis said he was always struck by something Pope Benedict had said, “that the faith is not a theory, a philosophy, an idea; it is an encounter. An encounter with Jesus.” If, on the other hand, “one has not encountered His mercy,” it would be possible even “recite the Creed from memory” without necessarily having faith”:
The doctors of the Law knew everything, all the dogmas of that time, all the morals of that time, everything. They did not have faith, because their hearts were far from God. Drawing away or having the will to go forward to encounter. And this is the grace that we ask for today: ‘O God, our Father, raise up in us the desire to meet your Christ,’ with good works. To meet Jesus. And for this we remember the grace that we have asked in prayer, with vigilance in prayer, industriousness in charity, and exulting in praise. And so we will encounter the Lord and we will have a very beautiful surprise. 

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Mon. November 28, 2016


Monday of the First Week in Advent
Lectionary: 175


Reading 1IS 4:2-6

On that day,
The branch of the LORD will be luster and glory,
and the fruit of the earth will be honor and splendor
for the survivors of Israel.
He who remains in Zion
and he who is left in Jerusalem
Will be called holy:
every one marked down for life in Jerusalem.
When the LORD washes away
the filth of the daughters of Zion,
And purges Jerusalem’s blood from her midst
with a blast of searing judgment,
Then will the LORD create,
over the whole site of Mount Zion
and over her place of assembly,
A smoking cloud by day
and a light of flaming fire by night.
For over all, the LORD’s glory will be shelter and protection:
shade from the parching heat of day,
refuge and cover from storm and rain.

Responsorial PsalmPS 122:1-2, 3-4B, 4CD-5, 6-7, 8-9

R. Let us go rejoicing to the house of the Lord.
I rejoiced because they said to me,
“We will go up to the house of the LORD."
And now we have set foot
within your gates, O Jerusalem.
R. Let us go rejoicing to the house of the Lord.
Jerusalem, built as a city
with compact unity.
To it the tribes go up,
the tribes of the LORD.
R. Let us go rejoicing to the house of the Lord.
According to the decree for Israel,
to give thanks to the name of the LORD.
In it are set up judgment seats,
seats for the house of David.
R. Let us go rejoicing to the house of the Lord.
Pray for the peace of Jerusalem!
May those who love you prosper!
May peace be within your walls,
prosperity in your buildings.
R. Let us go rejoicing to the house of the Lord.
Because of my relatives and friends
I will say, “Peace be within you!"
Because of the house of the LORD, our God,
I will pray for your good.
R. Let us go rejoicing to the house of the Lord.

AlleluiaSEE PS 80:4

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Come and save us, LORD our God;
let your face shine upon us, that we may be saved.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMT 8:5-11

When Jesus entered Capernaum,
a centurion approached him and appealed to him, saying,
“Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, suffering dreadfully.”
He said to him, “I will come and cure him.”
The centurion said in reply,
“Lord, I am not worthy to have you enter under my roof;
only say the word and my servant will be healed.
For I too am a man subject to authority,
with soldiers subject to me.
And I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes;
and to another, ‘Come here,’ and he comes;
and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.”
When Jesus heard this, he was amazed and said to those following him,
“Amen, I say to you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith.
I say to you, many will come from the east and the west,
and will recline with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
at the banquet in the Kingdom of heaven.”

Saint November 28 : St. James of the Marches : #Franciscan Missionary


FRANCISCAN FRIAR AND MISSIONARY

Born:1391, Monteprandone, Marche of Ancona, Italy
Died:November 28, 1476
Canonized:10 December 1726 by Pope Benedict XIII
Major Shrine:Franciscan church of St. Maria la Nuova
Patron of:Patron of the city of Naples, Italy

Franciscan, b. of a poor family named Gangala, at Monteprandone, March of Ancona, Italy, 1391; d. at Naples, 28 Nov., 1476. He is generally represented holding in his right hand a chalice, out of which a snake is escaping --an allusion to some endeavours of heretics to poison him or, less likely, to the controversy about the Precious Blood.
He began his studies at Offida under the guidance of his uncle, a priest, who soon afterwards put him to school at Ascoli. At the University of Perugia he took the degree of Doctor in Civil Law. After a short stay at Florence as tutor in a noble family, and as judge of sorcerers, James was received into the Order of the Friars Minor, in the chapel of the Portiuncula, Assisi, 26 July, 1416. Having finished his novitiate at the hermitage of the Carceri, near Assisi, he studied theology at Fiesole, near Florence, under St. Bernardine of Siena. On 13 June, 1420, be was ordained priest, and soon began to preach in Tuscany, in the Marches, and Umbria; for half a century he carried on his spiritual labours, remarkable for the miracles he performed and the numerous conversions he wrought. From 1427 James preached penance, combated heretic, and was on legations in Germany, Austria, Sweden, Denmark, Bohemia, Poland, Hungary, and Bosnia. In the last-mentioned country he was also commissary of the Friars Minor. At the time of the Council of Basle he promoted the union of the moderate Hussites with the Church, and that of the Greeks it the Council of Ferrara-Florence. Against the Turk, he preached several crusades, and at the death of St. John Capistran, in 1456, James was sent to Hungary as his successor. In Italy he fought the Fraticelli, instituted several montes pietatis, and preached in all the greater cities; Milan offered him the bishopric in 1460, which he declined. St. James belonged to the Observant branch of the Friars Minor, then rapidly spreading and exciting much envy. How much he suffered on this account is shown in a letter written by him to St. John Capistran, published by Nic. Dal-Gal, O.F.M., in "Archivum Franciscanum Historicum", I (1908), 94-97. Under Callistus III, in 1455, he was appointed an arbiter on the questions at issue between Conventuals and Observants. His decision was published 2 Feb., 1456, in a papal Bull, which pleased neither part . A few years later, on Easter Monday, 1462, St. James, preaching at Brescia, uttered the opinion of some theologians, that the Precious Blood shed during the Passion was not united with the Divinity of Christ during the three days of His burial. The Dominican James of Brescia, inquisitor, immediately cited him to his tribunal. James refused to appear, and after some troubles appealed to the Holy See. The question was discussed at Rome, Christmas, 1462 (not 1463, as some have it), before Pius II and the cardinals, but no decision was given. James spent the last three years of his life at Naples, and was buried there in the Franciscan church of S. Maria la Nuova, where his body is still to be seen. Beatified by Urban VIII, 1624, he was canonized by Benedict XIII, 1726. Naples venerates him as one of its patron saints (feast, 28 Nov.).
The works of St. James of the Marches have not as yet been collected. His library and autographs are preserved in part at the Municipio of Monteprandone (see Crivellucci, "I codici della libreria raccolta da S. Giacomo della Marca nel convento di S. Maria delle Grazie presso Monteprandone", Leghorn, 1889). He wrote "Dialogus contra Fraticellos" printed in Baluze-Mansi, "Miscellanea", II, Lucca, 1761, 595-610 (cf. Ehrle in "Archiv für Litt. u. Kirchengeschichte", IV, Freiburg im Br., 1888, 107-10). His numerous sermons are not edited. For some of them, and for his treatise on the "Miracles of the Name of Jesus", see Candido Mariotti, O.F.M., "Nome di Gesù ed i Francescani", Fano, 1909, 125-34. On his notebook, or "Itinerarium", See Luigi Tasso, O.F.M., in "Miscellanea Francescana", I (1886), 125-26: "Regula confitendi peccata" was several times edited in Latin and Italian during the fifteenth century. "De Sanguine Christi effuse" and some other treatises remained in manuscript.
SOURCE The Catholic Encyclopedia