Sunday, November 5, 2017

Saint November 6 : St. Leonard : Patron of #Political prisoners, #Prisoners, Women in #labor, and #Horses

St. Leonard
HERMIT, CONFESSOR
Feast: November 6
Information:
Feast Day:
November 6
Died:
559
Patron of:
political prisoners, imprisoned people, prisoners of war, and captives, women in labor, as well as horses

Today, November 6, we celebrate the feast day of Saint Leonard of Noblac (died 559), patron saint of prisoners and women in labor. Saint Leonard, born of noble parents, served the Lord through serving those in power, eventually withdrawing to hermitude and working countless miracles on behalf of those in need.
Saint Leonard was born to noble and illustrious parents in Gaul (now France), in the castle of Vendome in Orleans. Born into Frankish royalty, he belonged to the court of King Clovis, and his relatives were dignitaries, military commanders, and people of both privilege and society. Leonard was baptized by future Saint Remigius, and the King, himself, stood as sponsor for him. While he was still very young, the kingdom was threatened by an invading army. The Queen, knowing of Leonard’s Christian faith, jokingly suggested to Leonard that he invoke the help of his God to repel an invading repeal the attack. Leonard prayed, the tide of battle turned, and the armies of Gaul were victorious. Saint Remigius used this miracle to convert the King and thousands of followers to Christianity. From an early age, Leonard was destined for the service of the Lord. As he matured, he was so moved by the holy examples of Saint Remigius, Archbishop of Rheims that he renounced the world in order to lead a more perfect life. Looking to Saint Remigius for advice and spiritual guidance, Leonard quickly came to embrace and exemplify the greatest of Christian virtues, and while still a young man, took the tonsure (monk’s haircut) as a symbol to the world of his commitment to serving the Lord. His first calling was in service to prisoners, who he showed great charity, and worked miracles of freedom. Previously, King Clovis, in response to a prayer of Saint Remi, had issued an edict that prisoners in Rheims might be freed whenever his royal highness would pass through that city. Leonard asked the kind monarch to grant him personally the right to liberate prisoners whom he would find worthy of it, any time at all. Based upon his exemplary life, prudence, and good judgment (despite a young age), the king naturally agreed. Leonard earned himself a reputation of goodness, piety, and sancity, and soon all in the kingdom knew of him. He became a person of pilgrimage, with the sick and poor traveling great distances for his healing and charity. To each, he devoted himself, not only taking care of their physical needs, but teaching them the virtues of patience and love, and instructing them in the ways of sound doctrine. The king, so pleased with the reputation the holy man was earning for the court, desired to attach him permanently into his service, but Leonard, ever humble, replied that he preferred to live in humility and obscurity, as Christ had chosen for Himself for so many years. With the king’s permission, Leonard retired to a monastery in Orleans.
Saint Maximin, the abbot of the monastery, saw to it that Leonard was soon ordained a deacon, which office he accepted out of obedience. However, Leonard did not aspire to any additional ecclesiastical dignities. Rather, he desired a life of austerity, sanctification, and preaching—the latter task taking him from the monastery to the pagans of the province of Limoges. On his evangelical journeys, Leonard discovered a nearby mountain, heavily forested, and rich in solitude. There he built a cell from the fallen branches of trees, and remained for some time, taking great pleasure in the provisions of the Lord. Leonard lived on herbs, wild fruits, and spring water, relying solely on the Lord to provide. He spent his days in communion with God, devoting himself to prayer, meditation, and physical mortification.
Somehow, he was still found by those who sought him, and continued to work miracles for the people through his devotion and suffering. For example, from his prayers, the spouse of a nearby king successfully delivered a healthy child following a difficult labor. In deep gratitude, the king bestowed upon Saint Leonard the part of the forest in which he lived, allowing him to do with it as he would. Leonard built a beautiful oratory to the Our Blessed Mother, and was soon joined by two disciples. Together, the three prayed without ceasing, around the clock. With a more prominent building, Saint Leonard was easier to find, and the sick increased in numbers, seeking healing. Similarly, word of Saint Leonard’s charity toward those in prison spread, and following prayers for his intercession, prisoners reported witnessing their chains break before their eyes. These prisoners would then travel in pilgrimage and thanksgiving to Saint Leonard, dragging their heavy chains, and offering them in homage. Soon, a large collection of chains and leg irons could be found at the oratory! Saint Leonard treated each of these freed prisoners with respect and dignity, offering those who wished a tract of land in the forest on which to begin anew. Many remained, transforming their lives into honest work, serving the oratory and the poor of the region, and coming to Christ through the work of Saint Leonard. Eventually, a monastery was constructed, attracting an even greater number of disciples. Even distant relatives—all royals accustomed to living with opulent wealth—heard of his reputation, and giving up all they had, came to live with him and serve the Lord. He was surprised but encouraged their good resolutions, saying: “A fare of dry bread, eaten in the joy of a pure conscience, is of more worth than a house abundantly furnished, where quarrels and divisions prevail.”
Saint Leonard fell ill while traveling, and as the end of his time on earth grew near, he miraculously had himself transported back to the Oratory of Our Lady, where he died. Numerous miracles of healing and freedom continued to occur, and he remains a popular saint of intercession throughout France and Europe. After his death, churches and monasteries were widely dedicated to him throughout Europe, including in France, England, Belgium, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Bohemia, Poland, and many other countries. Pilgrims continued to travel long distances to his tomb, and over 4,000 miraculous favors have been recorded at his intercession.
In regards to Saint Leonard: “Solitude has always charms to the devout servant of God, because retirement from the world is very serviceable to his conversing with heaven. Solitude and silence settle and compose the thoughts; the mind augments its strength and vigour by rest and collection within itself, and in this state of serenity is most fit to reflect upon itself and its own wants, and to contemplate the mysteries of divine grace and love, the joys of heaven and the grounds of our hope. How shall a Christian who lives in the world practice this retirement? By not loving its spirit and maxims, by being as recollected as may be in the midst of business, and bearing always in mind that salvation is the most important and only affair; by shunning superfluous amusements and idle conversation and visits; and by consecrating every day some time, and a considerable part of Sundays and great festivals, to the exercises of religious retirement, especially devout prayer, self-examination, meditation, and pious reading.” (Taken from Vol. III of "The Lives or the Fathers, Martyrs and Other Principal Saints" by the Rev. Alban Butler.)
 O Almighty God, who hast called us to faith in thee, and bast compassed us about with so great a cloud of witnesses; Grant that we, encouraged by the good examples of thy Saints, and especially of thy servant Leonard, may persevere in running the race that is set before us, until at length, through thy mercy, we with them attain to thine eternal joy; through him who is the author and finisher of our faith, thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
Shared from 365 Rosaries

#BreakingNews 26 people Killed by Gunman at Church in Texas with over 30 injured - Please Pray


26 people were killed in Texas church shooting including the pastor's 14-year-old daughter.  A man opened fire inside of a church in a small South Texas community of Sutherland Springs on Sunday. The gunman was shot and killed by a self-inflicted wound while being chased by police. The killer was identified as Devin Patrick Kelley age 26. It was the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs. Sherri Pomeroy, wife of Pastor Frank Pomeroy, said in a text message that she lost her daughter "and many friends" in the shooting.   One hospital about 16 kilometres from the shooting says it was treating  victims with gunshot wounds.
U.S. President Donald Trump, who is in Japan, tweeted that he is watching the situation.
 Donald J. Trump ✔@realDonaldTrump 
May God be w/ the people of Sutherland Springs, Texas. The FBI & law enforcement are on the scene. I am monitoring the situation from Japan. 

Free Catholic Movie : "The Song of Bernadette" Stars Jennifer Jones about Our Lady of Lourdes

The Song of Bernadette (1943) 156 min - Biography | Drama - April 1945 (USA)  The Apparitions occurred in 1858 France. Based on the novel by Franz Werfel, "The Song of Bernadette" is a sympathetic account of the life of Saint Bernadette Soubirous, a sickly (asthmatic) French peasant girl who claimed to have seen 18 miraculous visions of a "beautiful lady" near her home village of Lourdes in 1858. Bernadette had become so happily excited by her initial vision, which she claimed included her having been instructed by this "beautiful lady" to return each day for 15 days*.
Director: Henry King Writers: George Seaton (screenplay), Franz Werfel (novel) Stars: Jennifer Jones, Charles Bickford, William Eythe |

#PopeFrancis "...modesty is essential for an existence that wants to conform to the teaching of Jesus, who is gentle and humble" FULL TEXT Angelus + Video


Dear brothers and sisters, good morning! The Gospel of today (cf. Mt 23: 1-12) is set in the last days of Jesus' life in Jerusalem; days full of expectations and even tensions. On the one hand, Jesus poses severe criticism to the scribes and the Pharisees; on the other hand, he gives important deliveries to Christians of all times, so also to us. He tells the crowd: "In the chair of Moses the scribes and the Pharisees have sat down. Practice and observe everything they say. " This means that they have the authority to teach what is in conformity with the Law of God. However, immediately afterwards, Jesus adds: "But do not act according to their works, for they say and do not" (v. 2- 3). Brothers and sisters, a frequent defect in those who have authority, whether civil or ecclesiastical, is to demand from other things, even just, but they do not practice in person. They do double life. Jesus says, "They bind heavy and difficult barges on the shoulders of people, but they do not even want to move them with a finger" (v. 4). This attitude is a bad exercise of authority, which instead should have its first strength by the good example. Authority originates from a good example, to help others practice what is right and proper, sustaining them in the trials that meet on the path of good. Authority is a help, but if it is badly exercised, it becomes oppressive, does not let people grow and creates a climate of mistrust and hostility, and also leads to corruption.
Jesus openly denounces some negative behaviors of the scribes and some of the Pharisees: "They are filled with places of honor in banquets, early seats in the synagogues, greetings in the squares" (vv.6-7). This is a temptation that corresponds to human pride and that is not always easy to win. It is the attitude of living only for appearance. Then Jesus gives the deliverance to his disciples: "Do not call" rabbis, "because one is your Master and you are all brothers. [...] And do not call "guides," because one is your Guide, the Christ. Whoever among you is greater, will be your servant "(vv 8-11). We disciples of Jesus must not seek titles of honor, authority, or supremacy. I tell you that to me personally sorry to see people who are psychologically living by running behind the vanity of honors. We, the disciples of Jesus, must not do this, for there must be a simple and fraternal attitude among us. We are all brothers and we must in no way overwhelm others and look them down from below. We are all brothers. If we have received qualities from Heavenly Father, we must put it to the brethren, and not take advantage of it for our own satisfaction and personal interest. We must not consider ourselves superior to others; humility is essential for an existence that wants to conform to the teaching of Jesus, who is gentle and humble in heart and came not to be served but to serve. The Virgin Mary, "humble and high above the creature" (Dante, Paradise, XXXIII, 2), helps with her maternal intercession to escape from pride and vanity, and to be myths and docile to the love that it comes from God, for the service of our brothers and for their joy, which will also be ours.
After the Angelus Dear brothers and sisters, In Indore, India, was proclaimed Beata Regina Maria Vattalil, religious of the Congregation of the Franciscan Clarissee Sisters, who was killed for his Christian faith in 1995. Sister Vattalil gave witness to Christ in love and mildness and joins the long line of martyrs of our time. His sacrifice is a seed of faith and peace, especially in Indian land. It was so good. They called her "the sister of the smile". I greet all of you, Romans and pilgrims, especially those from Gomel in Belarus, members of the "Roman Catholic Foundation Fund" in Madrid, the faithful of Valencia, Murcia and Torrente (Spain), and the religious Irmãs from Divina Providência celebrate the 175th anniversary of their Institute. I greet the juvenile choir "The Minipools" in Trento - after singing a little! -, the chorales of Candiana, Maser and Bagnoli di Sopra; participants at the Festival of Music and Sacred Art, from different countries; the faithful of Altamura, Guidonia, Lodi, and the parish of San Luca in Rome. I wish everyone a good Sunday. Please do not forget to pray for me. Good lunch and goodbye!

Saint November 5 : St. Zechariah and St. Elizabeth : #Parents of St. John the #Baptist


Elizabeth, was the cousin of Mary, the Mother of God. Zachary was her husband. Zachary was told by an angel in a vision that they would have a son and should name him John. Even though Elizabeth was past childbearing age. He doubted this message from the angel and was made dumb. After John's birth, Zachary's speech was restored.

Elizabeth is comes from the Hebrew meaning "My God has sworn". Elisabeth was the mother of John the Baptist and the wife of Zacharias/Zachary, according to the Gospel of Luke.

The account of their lives comes from the Gospel of St. Luke Chapter 1:
There was a priest named Zechariah, who belonged to the priestly order of Abijah. His wife was a descendant of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth.6Both of them were righteous before God, living blamelessly according to all the commandments and regulations of the Lord.7But they had no children, because Elizabeth was barren, and both were getting on in years.
8 Once when he was serving as priest before God and his section was on duty,9he was chosen by lot, according to the custom of the priesthood, to enter the sanctuary of the Lord and offer incense.10Now at the time of the incense-offering, the whole assembly of the people was praying outside.11Then there appeared to him an angel of the Lord, standing at the right side of the altar of incense.12When Zechariah saw him, he was terrified; and fear overwhelmed him.13But the angel said to him, ‘Do not be afraid, Zechariah, for your prayer has been heard. Your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you will name him John.14You will have joy and gladness, and many will rejoice at his birth,15for he will be great in the sight of the Lord. He must never drink wine or strong drink; even before his birth he will be filled with the Holy Spirit.16He will turn many of the people of Israel to the Lord their God.17With the spirit and power of Elijah he will go before him, to turn the hearts of parents to their children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous, to make ready a people prepared for the Lord.’18Zechariah said to the angel, ‘How will I know that this is so? For I am an old man, and my wife is getting on in years.’19The angel replied, ‘I am Gabriel. I stand in the presence of God, and I have been sent to speak to you and to bring you this good news.20But now, because you did not believe my words, which will be fulfilled in their time, you will become mute, unable to speak, until the day these things occur.’

Sunday Mass Online : Sun. November 5, 2017 - Readings + Video - #Eucharist

Thirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 151


Reading 1MAL 1:14B-2:2B, 8-10

A great King am I, says the LORD of hosts,
and my name will be feared among the nations.
And now, O priests, this commandment is for you:
If you do not listen,
if you do not lay it to heart,
to give glory to my name, says the LORD of hosts,
I will send a curse upon you
and of your blessing I will make a curse.
You have turned aside from the way,
and have caused many to falter by your instruction;
you have made void the covenant of Levi,
says the LORD of hosts.
I, therefore, have made you contemptible
and base before all the people,
since you do not keep my ways,
but show partiality in your decisions.
Have we not all the one father?
Has not the one God created us?
Why then do we break faith with one another,
violating the covenant of our fathers?

Responsorial PsalmPS 131:1, 2, 3

R. In you, Lord, I have found my peace.
O LORD, my heart is not proud,
nor are my eyes haughty;
I busy not myself with great things,
nor with things too sublime for me.
R. In you, Lord, I have found my peace.
Nay rather, I have stilled and quieted
my soul like a weaned child.
Like a weaned child on its mother's lap,
so is my soul within me.
R. In you, Lord, I have found my peace.
O Israel, hope in the LORD,
both now and forever.
R. In you, Lord, I have found my peace.

Reading 21 THES 2:7B-9, 13

Brothers and sisters:
We were gentle among you, as a nursing mother cares for her children.
With such affection for you, we were determined to share with you
not only the gospel of God, but our very selves as well,
so dearly beloved had you become to us.
You recall, brothers and sisters, our toil and drudgery.
Working night and day in order not to burden any of you,
we proclaimed to you the gospel of God.

And for this reason we too give thanks to God unceasingly,
that, in receiving the word of God from hearing us,
you received not a human word but, as it truly is, the word of God,
which is now at work in you who believe.

AlleluiaMT 23:9B, 10B

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
You have but one Father in heaven
and one master, the Christ.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMT 23:1-12

Jesus spoke to the crowds and to his disciples, saying,
"The scribes and the Pharisees
have taken their seat on the chair of Moses.
Therefore, do and observe all things whatsoever they tell you,
but do not follow their example.
For they preach but they do not practice.
They tie up heavy burdens hard to carry
and lay them on people's shoulders,
but they will not lift a finger to move them.
All their works are performed to be seen.
They widen their phylacteries and lengthen their tassels.
They love places of honor at banquets, seats of honor in synagogues,
greetings in marketplaces, and the salutation 'Rabbi.'
As for you, do not be called 'Rabbi.'
You have but one teacher, and you are all brothers.
Call no one on earth your father;
you have but one Father in heaven.
Do not be called 'Master';
you have but one master, the Christ.
The greatest among you must be your servant.
Whoever exalts himself will be humbled;
but whoever humbles himself will be exalted."

Saint November 5 : Venerable Solanus Casey : #Franciscan #Capuchin Priest


American Catholic (Image CassiePeaDesigns): Venerable Solanus Casey (1870-1957) Barney Casey became one of Detroit’s best-known priests even though he was not allowed to preach formally or to hear confessions! Barney came from a large family in Oak Grove, Wisconsin. At the age of 21, and after he had worked as a logger, a hospital orderly, a streetcar operator and a prison guard, he entered St. Francis Seminary in Milwaukee—where he found the studies difficult. He left there and, in 1896, joined the Capuchins in Detroit, taking the name Solanus. His studies for the priesthood were again arduous. On July 24, 1904, he was ordained, but because his knowledge of theology was judged to be weak, Father Solanus was not given permission to hear confessions or to preach. A Franciscan Capuchin who knew him well said this annoying restriction "brought forth in him a greatness and a holiness that might never have been realized in any other way."
During his 14 years as porter and sacristan in Yonkers, New York, the people there recognized him as a fine speaker. "For, though he was forbidden to deliver doctrinal sermons," writes his biographer, James Derum, "he could give inspirational talks, or feverinos, as the Capuchins termed them" (18:96). His spiritual fire deeply impressed his listeners. Father Solanus served at parishes in Manhattan and Harlem before returning to Detroit, where he was porter and sacristan for 20 years at St. Bonaventure Monastery.
Every Wednesday afternoon he conducted well-attended services for the sick. A co-worker estimates that on the average day 150 to 200 people came to see Father Solanus in the front office. Most of them came to receive his blessing; 40 to 50 came for consultation. Many people considered him instrumental in cures and other blessings they received. Father Solanus’ sense of God’s providence inspired many of his visitors. "Blessed be God in all his designs" was one of his favorite expressions. The many friends of Father Solanus helped the Capuchins begin a soup kitchen during the Depression. Capuchins are still feeding the hungry there today. In 1946 in failing health, he was transferred to the Capuchin novitiate in Huntington, Indiana, where he lived until 1956 when he was hospitalized in Detroit. He died on July 31, 1957. An estimated 20,000 people passed by his coffin before his burial in St. Bonaventure Church in Detroit. At the funeral Mass, the provincial Father Gerald said: "His was a life of service and love for people like me and you. When he was not himself sick, he nevertheless suffered with and for you that were sick. When he was not physically hungry, he hungered with people like you. He had a divine love for people. He loved people for what he could do for them—and for God, through them." In 1960 a Father Solanus Guild was formed in Detroit to aid Capuchin seminarians. By 1967 the guild had 5,000 members—many of them grateful recipients of his practical advice and his comforting assurance that God would not abandon them in their trials. He was declared Venerable in 1995.
 Comment: James Patrick Derum, his biographer, writes that eventually Father Solanus was weary from bearing the burdens of the people who visited him. "Long since, he had come to know the Christ-taught truth that pure love of God and one’s fellowmen as children of God are in the final event all that matter. Living this truth ardently and continuously had made him, spiritually, a free man—free from slavery to passions, from self-seeking, from self-indulgence, from self-pity—free to serve wholly both God and man" (The Porter of St. Bonaventure’s, page 199).
 Quote: Father Maurice Casey, a brother of Father Solanus, was once in a sanitarium near Baltimore and was annoyed at the priest-chaplain there. Father Solanus wrote his brother: "God could have established his Church under supervision of angels that have no faults or weaknesses. But who can doubt that as it stands today, consisting of and under the supervision of poor sinners—successors to the ‘poor fishermen of Galilee’ #151; the Church is a more outstanding miracle than any other way?"
Shared from : AmericanCatholic