Wednesday, January 3, 2018

Saint January 4 : St. Elizabeth Ann Seton : #Foundress of the #Sisters of #Charity ; Patron of Catholic Schools



Feast Day:January4

Born:
28 August 1774 in New York City, New York, USA
Died:4 January 1821 in Emmitsburg, Maryland
Canonized:
14 September 1975 by Pope Paul VI
Patron of:Catholic Schools; State of Maryland
 She founded the first American religious community for women, the Sisters of Charity. She opened the first American parish school and established the first American Catholic orphanage. All this she did in the span of 46 years while raising her five children.
Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton is a true daughter of the American Revolution, born August 28, 1774, just two years before the Declaration of Independence. By birth and marriage, she was linked to the first families of New York and enjoyed the fruits of high society. Reared a staunch Episcopalian by her mother and stepmother, she learned the value of prayer, Scripture and a nightly examination of conscience. Her father, Dr. Richard Bayley, did not have much use for churches but was a great humanitarian, teaching his daughter to love and serve others.
The early deaths of her mother in 1777 and her baby sister in 1778 gave Elizabeth a feel for eternity and the temporariness of the pilgrim life on earth. Far from being brooding and sullen, she faced each new “holocaust,” as she put it, with hopeful cheerfulness.
At 19, Elizabeth was the belle of New York and married a handsome, wealthy businessman, William Magee Seton. They had five children before his business failed and he died of tuberculosis. At 30, Elizabeth was widowed, penniless, with five small children to support.
While in Italy with her dying husband, Elizabeth witnessed Catholicity in action through family friends. Three basic points led her to become a Catholic: belief in the Real Presence, devotion to the Blessed Mother and conviction that the Catholic Church led back to the apostles and to Christ. Many of her family and friends rejected her when she became a Catholic in March 1805.
To support her children, she opened a school in Baltimore. From the beginning, her group followed the lines of a religious community, which was officially founded in 1809.
The thousand or more letters of Mother Seton reveal the development of her spiritual life from ordinary goodness to heroic sanctity. She suffered great trials of sickness, misunderstanding, the death of loved ones (her husband and two young daughters) and the heartache of a wayward son. She died January 4, 1821, and became the first American-born citizen to be beatified (1963) and then canonized (1975). She is buried in Emmitsburg, Maryland.
SEE ALSO : 

Easy #Novena to St. Elizabeth Ann Seton - #Prayers to SHARE

http://jceworld.blogspot.ca/2018/01/easy-novena-to-st-elizabeth-ann-seton.html
Text from American Catholic - Image source Google Images

Free Catholic Movie : Pope John Paul II : Stars Albert Finney #JPII

This film's timeline begins with the death of Pope John Paul I on September 29, 1978, and then flashes back to Karol Wojtyła as a young man growing up decades earlier in Wadowice, Poland. The storyline then returns slowly back to 1978, covering Wojtyła's early life, family relationships, his political involvements fighting against Nazism during World War II and struggling against post-World War II Communism in Poland, and his relationship and involvement in the Roman Catholic Church as he becomes a priest, a bishop, a cardinal, and is eventually installed as a pope.
 Pope John Paul II is a 1984 American biopic drama TV movie based on the life of Karol Wojtyła, from his early days as an activist in Poland to his installation as Pope John Paul II. Written by Christopher Knopf and directed by Herbert Wise, the film stars Albert Finney, Robert Austin, Caroline Bliss, Brian Cox, and John Forgeham. The film marks both Albert Finney's American television debut and the first script Finney had ever turned down upon initial reading.

#PopeFrancis "To prepare ourselves to celebrate worthily the sacred mysteries, we acknowledge, before God... that we have sinned....“I confess…I have sinned.” FULL TEXT + Video

Pope's General Audience of 3 January 2018: Full text
Dear brothers and sisters:
In our catechesis on the Holy Eucharist, today we consider the penitential rite.  To prepare ourselves to celebrate worthily the sacred mysteries, we acknowledge, before God and our brothers and sisters, that we have sinned.  Significantly, we make this confession as a community, yet in the Confiteor each of us speaks personally: “I confess… that I have sinned.” 
Like the humble publican in Jesus’ parable, we strike our breast and recognize that we are unworthy of the gift of God’s mercy and forgiveness.  We then beg the intercession of Our Lady and all the angels and saints to sustain us on the path of holiness and conversion.  The priest then pronounces the absolution – “May almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life”.  Unlike the absolution granted in confession, this does not remit mortal sin, yet it expresses our trust in God’s promise of forgiveness and reconciliation. 

We thus join the great line of biblical figures – like David, the Prodigal Son and Saint Peter – who, conscious of their sin, acknowledged it before God with confidence in the transforming power of his grace.
Biblical reference: 1Corinti 10, 15-17
 I speak as to sensible men; judge for yourselves what I say. The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ?  The bread which we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ?  Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread.
Text Source - Vatican News

#Wow Andrea Bocelli sings Beautiful Ave Maria with Orchestra for Vatican project - Watch and SHARE


"We are here to celebrate the beauty and joy of love, and to spread the good news of the family," said Msgr. Carlos Simon Vasquez, Undersecretary of the Vatican Dicastery for the Laity, the Family and Life, in his presentation of the new event in the project "The Great Mystery. The Gospel of the family school of humanity for our times," on Saturday night in St. Stephens Basilica in Budapest,. Accompanied by the Óbudai Danubia Zenekar Orchestra under the direction of Marcello Rota, the young Ukrainian violinist Anastasiya Petryshak, and the Vox Humana Choir, the tenor Andrea Bocelli performed a rich repertoire featuring Händel’s Hallelujah, Rossini's Stabat Mater, the Ave Maria of Schubert and Verdi's Va pensiero. Bearing greetings from Cardinal Kevin Farrell,
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#BreakingNews Uprising in Iran leads to 23 Killed and 450 Arrests - Please Pray

AsiaNews Report: Huge turnout for marches against the USA and in support of the leadership. The death toll rises to 23 dead and 450 arrests. Khamenei: External "enemies" who want to foment chaos and target institutions. Zarif: Security and stability depend on the Iranians, free to "protest and vote". Poverty and unemployment are the fundamental reasons for the demonstrations. 


Tehran (AsiaNews) - This morning, tens of thousands of people took to the streets in different cities, in the context of a massive campaign to support the government and the religious leadership of the Islamic Republic, amid days of violent protests. According to state TV, at least 23 people died in the clashes that led to the arrest of over 450 people.
Citizens marched through the streets of some of the country's most important cities, including Ahvaz (south-west), Kermanshah (west) and Gorgan (north). Many chanting slogans such as "leaders, we are ready" and others against the United States ("death to America") and Israel. The demonstrators waved flags of the Islamic Republic and held posters with the face of the supreme leader, the Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and the words "death to the seditious".
This morning’s demonstrations follow a night of relative calm in the capital, Tehran, the epicenter of the protests in the previous three days. Behind the uprising, promoted above all by young people - the average age of those arrested is 25 - the economic problems and austerity measures launched by the executive, including cutting social spending and rising food and fuel prices.
President Hassan Rouhani spoke of a "small minority" of people who foment the uprising, adding that it will be the people who will respond to them adequately. He has not excluded the mobilization of millions of people to stop the protests.
Yesterday, for the first time since the beginning of the protest, the supreme Iranian leader, the Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, intervened, pointing at the "enemies" of Iran who are outside the country. The Shiite leader claims that these would have "strengthened the alliance to hit institutions" of the Islamic Republic and of trying to exploit "the opportunity" to foment chaos.
Without mentioning them directly, the great ayatollah spoke of external enemies who "used different instruments", including "money, weapons, politics and espionage to create unrest". "In due course - concluded Khamenei - I will speak to the people about recent incidents".
Meanwhile, the international pressure on the institutional leaders is rising, to avoid the repression of the protests in blood. In a note, the European Union (EU) expresses concern over the escalation of violence and ensures that it "closely follows" the demonstrations underway "and the" unacceptable loss of human life ". The United States is insistently calling for a meeting of the United Nations Security Council, while the French Foreign Minister has decided to postpone his visit to Tehran scheduled for January 5 and 6.
Videos posted on social networks reveal images of demonstrators trying to assault a police station in the central town of Qahderijan. According to state television, six of the nine victims registered in the area were people trying to steal weapons and ammunition from the barracks, located in the province of Isfahan and about 350 meters south of the capital.
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Zarif recalled that Iran's security and stability depend on its own population. Commenting on the government protests, Tehran's chief of diplomacy - the great architect of the 2015 nuclear agreement - spoke of people who have "infiltrated" peaceful protests. He added that they will not be allowed to "violate the rights of the Iranians", who are free "to vote and to protest".
The Iranians have various reasons to protest, from youth unemployment to inflation, exacerbated by the sanctions that the US administration has maintained in spite of the nuclear agreement (the JCPO), especially in terms of bank loans and credit. An AsiaNews source comments: "95% of the protestors are young people under the age of 25. Poverty and the high percentage of unemployed people lead them to demand a change in the regime". (DS)

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Wed. December 3, 2018 - #Eucharist


January 3, 2018
Christmas Weekday
Lectionary: 206


Reading 11 JN 2:29–3:6

If you consider that God is righteous,
you also know that everyone who acts in righteousness
is begotten by him.

See what love the Father has bestowed on us
that we may be called the children of God.
Yet so we are.
The reason the world does not know us is that it did not know him.
Beloved, we are God's children now;
what we shall be has not yet been revealed.
We do know that when it is revealed we shall be like him,
for we shall see him as he is.
Everyone who has this hope based on him makes himself pure,
as he is pure.

Everyone who commits sin commits lawlessness,
for sin is lawlessness.
You know that he was revealed to take away sins,
and in him there is no sin.
No one who remains in him sins;
no one who sins has seen him or known him.

Responsorial Psalm PS 98:1, 3CD-4, 5-6

R. (3cd) All the ends of the earth have seen the saving power of God.
Sing to the LORD a new song,
for he has done wondrous deeds;
His right hand has won victory for him,
his holy arm.
R. All the ends of the earth have seen the saving power of God.
All the ends of the earth have seen
the salvation by our God.
Sing joyfully to the LORD, all you lands;
break into song; sing praise.
R. All the ends of the earth have seen the saving power of God.
Sing praise to the LORD with the harp,
with the harp and melodious song.
With trumpets and the sound of the horn
sing joyfully before the King, the LORD.
R. All the ends of the earth have seen the saving power of God.

AlleluiaJN 1:14A, 12A

 R. Alleluia, alleluia.
The Word of God became flesh and dwelt among us.
To those who accepted him
he gave power to become the children of God.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelJN 1:29-34

John the Baptist saw Jesus coming toward him and said,
"Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world.
He is the one of whom I said,
'A man is coming after me who ranks ahead of me
because he existed before me.'
I did not know him,
but the reason why I came baptizing with water
was that he might be made known to Israel."
John testified further, saying,
"I saw the Spirit come down like a dove from the sky
and remain upon him.
I did not know him,
but the one who sent me to baptize with water told me,
'On whomever you see the Spirit come down and remain,
he is the one who will baptize with the Holy Spirit.'
Now I have seen and testified that he is the Son of God."

Saint January 3 : St. Genevieve : #Virgin : #Patroness of #Paris


Patroness of Paris, b. at Nanterre, c. 419 or 422; d. at Paris, 512. Her feast is kept on 3 January. She was the daughter of Severus and Gerontia; popular tradition represents her parents as poor peasants, though it seems more likely that they were wealthy and respectable townspeople. In 429 St. Germain of Auxerre and St. Lupus of Troyes were sent across from Gaul to Britain to combat Pelagianism. On their way they stopped at Nanterre, a small village about eight miles from Paris. The inhabitants flocked out to welcome them, and St. Germain preached to the assembled multitude. It chanced that the pious demeanour and thoughtfulness of a young girl among his hearers attracted his attention. After the sermon he caused the child to be brought to him, spoke to her with interest, and encouraged her to persevere in the path of virtue.
 Learning that she was anxious to devote herself to the service of God, he interviewed her parents, and foretold them that their child would lead a life of sanctity and by her example and instruction bring many virgins to consecrate themselves to God. Before parting next morning he saw her again, and on her renewing her consecration he blessed her and gave her a medal engraved with a cross, telling her to keep it in remembrance of her dedication to Christ. He exhorted her likewise to be content with the medal, and wear it instead of her pearls and golden ornaments. There seem to have been no convents near her village; and Genevieve, like so many others who wished to practise religious virtue, remained at home, leading an innocent, prayerful life.
It is uncertain when she formally received the religious veil. Some writers assert that it was on the occasion of St. Gregory's return from his mission to Britain; others say she received it about her sixteenth year, along with two companions, from the hands of the Bishop of Paris. On the death of her parents she went to Paris, and lived with her godmother. She devoted herself to works of charity and practised severe corporal austerities, abstaining completely from flesh meat and breaking her fast only twice in the week. These mortifications she continued for over thirty years, till her ecclesiastical superiors thought it their duty to make her diminish her austerities.
Many of her neighbours, filled with jealousy and envy, accused Genevieve of being an impostor and a hypocrite. Like Blessed Joan of Arc, in later times, she had frequent communion with the other world, but her visions and prophecies were treated as frauds and deceits. Her enemies conspired to drown her; but, through the intervention of Germain of Auxerre, their animosity was finally overcome. The bishop of the city appointed her to look after the welfare of the virgins dedicated to God, and by her instruction and example she led them to a high degree of sanctity. In 451 Attila and his Huns were sweeping over Gaul; and the inhabitants of Paris prepared to flee. Genevieve encouraged them to hope and trust in God; she urged them to do works of penance, and added that if they did so the town would be spared.
Her exhortations prevailed; the citizens recovered their calm, and Attila's hordes turned off towards Orléans, leaving Paris untouched. Some years later Merowig (Mérovée) took Paris; during the siege Genevieve distinguished herself by her charity and self- sacrifice. Through her influence Merowig and his successors, Childeric and Clovis, displayed unwonted clemency towards the citizens. It was she, too, who first formed the plan of erecting a church in Paris in honour of Saints Peter and Paul. It was begun by Clovis at Mont-lès-Paris, shortly before his death in 511. Genevieve died the following year, and when the church was completed her body was interred within it. This fact, and the numerous miracles wrought at her tomb, caused the name of Sainte-Geneviève to be given to it. Kings, princes, and people enriched it with their gifts. In 847 it was plundered by the Normans and was partially rebuilt, but was completed only in 1177. This church having fallen into decay once more, Louis XV began the construction of a new church in 1764. The Revolution broke out before it was dedicated, and it was taken over in 1791, under the name of the Panthéon, by the Constituent Assembly, to be a burial place for distinguished Frenchmen.
It was restored to Catholic purposes in 1821 and 1852, having been secularized as a national mausoleum in 1831 and, finally, in 1885. St. Genevieve's relics were preserved in her church, with great devotion, for centuries, and Paris received striking proof of the efficacy of her intercession. She saved the city from complete inundation in 834. In 1129 a violent plague, known as the mal des ardents, carried off over 14,000 victims, but it ceased suddenly during a procession in her honour. Innocent II, who had come to Paris to implore the king's help against the Antipope Anacletus in 1130, examined personally into the miracle and was so convinced of its authenticity that he ordered a feast to be kept annually in honour of the event on 26 November.
A small church, called Sainte-Geneviève des Ardents, commemorated the miracle till 1747, when it was pulled down to make room for the Foundling Hospital. The saint's relics were carried in procession yearly to the cathedral, and Mme de Sévigné gives a description of the pageant in one of her letters. The revolutionaries of 1793 destroyed most of the relics preserved in St. Genevieve's church, and the rest were cast to the winds by the mob in 1871.
Fortunately, however, a large relic had been kept at Verneuil, Oise, in the eighteenth century, and is still extant. The church built by Clovis was entrusted to the Benedictines. In the ninth century they were replaced by secular canons. In 1148, under Eugene III and Louis VII, canons from St. Victor's Abbey at Senlis were introduced. About 1619 Louis XIII named Cardinal François de La Rochefoucauld Abbot of St. Genevieve's. The canons had been lax and the cardinal selected Charles Faure to reform them. This holy man was born in 1594, and entered the canons regular at Senlis. He was remarkable for his piety, and, when ordained, succeeded after a hard struggle in reforming the abbey.
 Many of the houses of the canons regular adopted his reform. He and a dozen companions took charge of Sainte-Geneviève-du-Mont, at Paris, in 1634. This became the mother-house of a new congregation, the Canons Regular of St. Genevieve, which spread widely over France. Another institute called after the saint was the Daughters of St. Genevieve, founded at Paris, in 1636, by Francesca de Blosset, with the object of nursing the sick and teaching young girls. A somewhat similar institute, popularly known as the Miramiones, had been founded under the invocation of the Holy Trinity, in 1611, by Marie Bonneau de Rubella Beauharnais de Miramion. These two institutes were united in 1665, and the associates called the Canonesses of St. Genevieve. The members took no vows, but merely promised obedience to the rules as long as they remained in the institute. Suppressed during the Revolution, it was revived in 1806 by Jeanne-Claude Jacoulet under the name of the Sisters of the Holy Family. They now have charge of over 150 schools and orphanages. Text from Catholic Encyclopedia