Saturday, January 6, 2018

Saint January 7 : St. Raymond of Penyafort : Patron of Lawyers and Canon Law


Born:
1175 at Penafort, Catalonia, Spain
Died:6 January 1275 at Barcelona, Spain
Canonized:29 April 1601 by Pope Clement VIII
Patron of:canon lawyers, lawyers
Born at Villafranca de Benadis, near Barcelona, in 1175; died at Barcelona, 6 January, 1275. He became professor of canon law in 1195, and taught for fifteen years. He left Spain for Bologna in 1210 to complete his studies in canon law. He occupied a chair of canon law in the university for three years and published a treatise on ecclesiastical legislation which still exists in the Vatican Library. Raymond was attracted to the Dominican Order by the preaching of Blessed Reginald, prior of the Dominicans of Bologna, and received the habit in the Dominican Convent of Barcelona, whither he had returned from Italy in 1222.
At Barcelona he was co-founder with St. Peter Nolasco of the Order of Mercedarians. He also founded institutes at Barcelona and Tunis for the study of Oriental languages, to convert the Moors and Jews. Once he went with King James to the Island of Majorca to preach about Jesus. The Saint commanded the King to send a woman away. The King said he would, but he did not keep his promise. So St. Raymond decided to leave the Island. The King declared he would punish any ship captain who brought the Saint back to Barcelona. Then, Saint Raymond spread his cloak upon the water, tied up one corner of it to a stick for a sail, made the Sign of the Cross, stepped onto the cloak, and sailed along for six hours until he reached Barcelona. This miracle moved the King. He was sorry for what he had done, and he became a true follower of St. Raymond.
St. Raymond was one hundred years old at the time of his death. At the request of his superiors Raymond published the Summa Casuum, of which several editions appeared in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In 1229 Raymond was appointed theologian and penitentiary to the Cardinal Archbishop of Sabina, John of Abbeville, and was summoned to Rome in 1230 by Gregory IX, who appointed him chaplain and grand penitentiary.
 The reputation of the saint for juridical science decided the pope to employ Raymond of Peñafort's talents in re-arranging and codifying the canons of the Church. He had to rewrite and condense decrees that had been multiplying for centuries, and which were contained in some twelve or fourteen collections already existing. We learn from a Bull of Gregory IX to the Universities of Paris and Bologna that many of the decrees in the collections were but repetitions of ones issued before, many contradicted what had been determined in previous decrees, and many on account of their great length led to endless confusion, while others had never been embodied in any collection and were of uncertain authority. The pope announced the new publication in a Bull directed to the doctors and students of Paris and Bologna in 1231, and commanded that the work of St. Raymond alone should be considered authoritative, and should alone be used in the schools. When Raymond completed his work the pope appointed him Archbishop of Tarragona, but the saint declined the honour. Having edited the Decretals he returned to Spain. He was not allowed to remain long in seclusion, as he was elected General of the Order in 1238; but he resigned two years later. During his tenure of office he published a revised edition of the Dominican Constitutions, and it was at his request that St. Thomas wrote the Summa Contra Gentiles. St. Raymond was canonized by Clement VIII in 1601. His Summa de Poenitentia et Matrimonio is said to be the first work of its kind. His feast is 23 January. Edited from The Catholic Encyclopedia

#PopeFrancis #Epiphany "We give a gift pleasing to Jesus when we care for a sick person, ...forgive someone who has hurt us." FULL TEXT Homily + Mass Video



FULL TEXT Homily of Pope Francis from January 6, 2018 on the Epiphany: Source: VaticanNews: 
Three actions of the Magi guide our journey towards the Lord, who today is revealed as light and salvation for all peoples.  The Magi see the star, they set out and they bring gifts.
Seeing the star.  This is where it starts.  But why, we might ask, did the Magi alone see the star?  Perhaps because few people raised their eyes to heaven.  We often make do with looking at the ground: it’s enough to have our health, a little money and a bit of entertainment.  I wonder if we still know how to look up at the sky.  Do we know how to dream, to long for God, to expect the newness he brings, or do we let ourselves be swept along by life, like dry branches before the wind?  The Magi were not content with just getting by, with keeping afloat.  They understood that to truly live, we need a lofty goal and we need to keep looking up.
Yet we can also ask why, among all those who looked up at the heavens, so many others did not follow that star, “his star” (Mt 2:2).  Perhaps because the star was not eye-catching, did not shine any brighter than other stars.  It was a star – so the Gospel tells us – that the Magi saw “at its rising” (vv. 2, 9).  Jesus’ star does not dazzle or overwhelm, but gently invites.  We may ask ourselves what star we have chosen to follow in our lives.  Some stars may be bright, but they do not point the way.  So it is with success, money, career, honours and pleasures when these become our life.  They are meteors: they blaze momentarily, but then quickly burn out and their brilliance fades.  They are shooting stars that mislead rather than lead.  The Lord’s star, however, may not always overwhelm by its brightness, but it is always there: it takes you by the hand in life and accompanies you.  It does not promise material reward, but ensures peace and grants, as it did to the Magi, “exceedingly great joy” (Mt 2:10).  But it also tells us to set out.
Setting out, the second thing the Magi do, is essential if we are to find Jesus.  His star demands a decision to take up the journey and to advance tirelessly on our way.  It demands that we free ourselves from useless burdens and unnecessary extras that only prove a hindrance, and accept unforeseen obstacles along the map of life.  Jesus allows himself to be found by those who seek him, but to find him we need to get up and go, not sit around but take risks, not stand still, but set out.  Jesus makes demands: he tells those who seek him to leave behind the armchair of worldly comforts and the reassuring warmth of hearth and home.  Following Jesus is not a polite etiquette to be observed, but a journey to be undertaken.  God, who set his people free in the exodus and called new peoples to follow his star, grants freedom and joy always and only in the course of a journey.  In other words, if we want to find Jesus, we have to overcome our fear of taking risks, our self-satisfaction and our indolent refusal to ask anything more of life.  We need to take risks simply to meet a Child.  Yet those risks are immensely worth the effort, since in finding that Child, in discovering his tenderness and love, we rediscover ourselves. 
Setting out is not easy.  The Gospel shows us this through a cast of characters.  There is Herod, wild with fear that the birth of a king will threaten his power.  So he organizes meetings and sends people out to gather information, yet he himself does not budge; he stays locked up in his palace.  Even “all Jerusalem” (v. 3) is afraid: afraid of the new things God is bringing about.  They want everything to remain as it was; no one has the courage to leave.  The temptation of the priests and scribes is more subtle: they know the exact place and tell it to Herod, quoting the ancient prophecy.  They know, but they themselves make no move towards Bethlehem.  Theirs can be the temptation of those who are used to being believers: they can talk at length about the faith they know so well, but will not take a personal risk for the Lord.  They talk, but do not pray; they complain, but do no good.  The Magi, on the other hand, talk little and journey much.  Ignorant of the truths of faith, they are filled with longing and set out.  So the Gospel tells us: They “came to worship him” (v. 2); “they set out; they went in, and fell down and worshiped him; they went back” (vv. 9, 11, 12).  They kept moving.
Bringing gifts.  Having come to Jesus after a long journey, the Magi do as he does: they bring gifts.  Jesus is there to give his life; they offer him their own costly gifts: gold, incense and myrrh.  The Gospel becomes real when the journey of life ends in giving.  To give freely, for the Lord’s sake, without expecting anything in return: this is the sure sign that we have found Jesus.  For he says: “The gift you have received, give freely as a gift” (Mt 10:8).  To do good without counting the cost, even when unasked, even when you gain nothing thereby, even if it is unpleasant.  That is what God wants.  He, who become small for our sake, asks us to offer something for the least of his brothers and sisters.  Who are they?  They are those who have nothing to give in return, the needy, the hungry, the stranger, the prisoner, the poor (cf. Mt25:31-46).  We give a gift pleasing to Jesus when we care for a sick person, spend time with a difficult person, help someone for the sake of helping, or forgive someone who has hurt us.  These are gifts freely given, and they cannot be lacking in the lives of Christians.  Jesus reminds us that if we only love those who love us, we do as the pagans do (cf. Mt 5:46-47).  Today let us look at our hands, so often empty of love, and let us try to think of some free gift that we can give without expecting anything in return.  That will please the Lord.  And let us ask him: “Lord, let me rediscover the joy of giving”.  

Merry Orthodox Christmas! History of #Orthodox Celebration January 7 + FULL Text Christmas message of #Patriarch

MERRY CHRISTMAS! Christmas is celebrated on January 7, 2018 for those following the Julian Calendar. This applies to many Eastern Orthodox Churches. A custom is to refrain from meat on Christmas Eve. The Julian calendar was also used in Europe until 1582 and in England until 1752. The Gregorian calendar replaced the Julian. Pope Gregory XIII introduced this calendar which corrected some inaccuracies of astronomy. The Julian Calendar is 13 days behind the Gregorian. Russian, Serbian, Macedonian, Coptic, Georgian, Ukranian all follow this date for Christmas. Most American Orthodox follow the Revised Julian Calendar which uses Dec. 25. 

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2018 Christmas Homily of Patriarch Kiril of Russia:
NATIVITY MESSAGE
of
The Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia Kirill
to the
Archpastors, Pastors, Deacons, Monks and Nuns,
and All the Faithful Children of the Russian Orthodox Church


Beloved in the Lord archpastors, all-honourable presbyters and deacons, God-loving monks and nuns, dear brothers and sisters!

From the depths of my heart I congratulate you on the great feast of the Nativity of Christ – the feast of the birth in the flesh of our Lord and God and Saviour Jesus Christ from the Holy Spirit and Most Pure Virgin Mary. Today we call upon all people, together with the Church, to glorify the Creator and Maker with the words: “O all the earth, sing ye unto the Lord” (heirmos of the First Ode of the Canon for the Nativity of Christ).
The all-beneficent God who loves his creation sends down his Only-Begotten Son the awaited Messiah so that he may accomplish the cause of our salvation. The Son of God, “which is in the bosom of the Father” (Jn 1:18), becomes the Son of Man and enters our world so that through his blood he may deliver us from sin and so that the sting of death should never inspire fear in the human person.
We know that the Magi who bowed down before Christ brought him gifts. What gift, then, can we bring to the Divine Teacher? The very gift which he asks of us himself: “Give me thine heart, and let thine eyes observe my ways” (Prov 23:26). What does it mean to give one’s heart? The heart is a symbol of life. If it ceases to beat, then we die. To give one’s heart to God is to dedicate our whole life to him. This dedication does not require that we renounce all that we have. We are merely called upon to remove from our hearts that which is an obstacle to the Divine presence within it. When all our thoughts are taken up with our own ego, when there is no room in our hearts for our neighbour, then there is no room for the Lord too. The presence of our neighbour in our heart depends mainly upon our capability to feel another’s pain and respond to it with deeds of mercy.
The Lord requires that we “observe his ways.” To observe the ways of God is to see the Divine presence in our lives and in human history: to see the manifestations of both Divine love and his righteous ire.
The past year for our people was replete with reminiscences about the tragic events of the twentieth century and the incipient persecution of the faith. We recalled the great spiritual exploits of the new martyrs and confessors who steadfastly bore witness to their fidelity to Christ. Yet even at that terrible time for our country, the Lord bestowed his mercy: after an enforced two hundred year rupture, the Office of Patriarch was revived in the land of Russia, and the Church, at a time of tribulation, found in the person of the holy bishop Tikhon, who was elected First Hierarch, a wise and courageous pastor, through whose ardent prayers before the Throne of the Most High Creator our Church and people were able to pass through the crucible of trials.
Today we are undergoing a special period: afflictions have not yet left this world, every day we “hear of wars and rumours of wars” (Mt 24:6). Yet how much of God’s love is poured out upon people! The world exists in spite of the forces of evil, while human love and family values abide in spite of the unbelievable attempts to destroy, desecrate and distort them. Faith in God is alive in the hearts of the majority of people. And our Church, in spite of decades of persecution in the recent past and the endeavours to undermine her authority in the present, remains and shall always be with Christ.
We believe that after undergoing the current trials, the peoples of historical Russia will preserve and renew their spiritual unity, will prosper materially and socially.
The Nativity of Christ is the central event of human history. People have always sought out God, yet the Creator – the Triune God – revealed himself as fully as possible to the human race only through the incarnation of his Only-Begotten Son. He came into a world of sin to make people worthy of the beneficent will of the heavenly Father and lay a firm foundation to the world in leaving this precept: “Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you” (Jn 14:27).
May this year be for our people, for the peoples of historical Russia and all the nations of the earth, a year of peace and prosperity.  May the Divine Infant, who has been born in Bethlehem, help us to find hope that overcomes fear, and through faith feel the power of Divine love which transforms the life of people.
Amen.

 /+KIRILL/
PATRIARCH OF MOSCOW AND ALL RUSSIA

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#PopeFrancis "..may every person find Christ, the Light of Truth, and may the world go forward along the path of...peace." Angelus FULL TEXT + Video


Dear brothers and sisters, good morning!
Today, the Feast of the Epiphany of the Lord, the Gospel presents three attitudes with which the coming of Jesus and his manifestation to the world were received: careful searching, indifference, fear.
The Magi do not hesitate to set out to search for the Messiah. When they reach Jerusalem they ask: "Where is the infant king of the Jews? We saw his star as it rose and have come to do him homage". They have made a long journey and now they conduct a careful search to discover where the newborn King can be found. In Jerusalem they turn to King Herod, who asks the chief priests and scribes to inquire about the place where the Messiah was to be born.
This careful search of the Magi contrasts with the indifference of the high priests and scribes. They know the Scriptures and are able to give the right answer regarding the place of His birth: "In Bethlehem of Judea, because this is what the prophet wrote", but they do not bother to go and visit the Messiah. Bethlehem is only a few kilometers away, but they do not move.
Even more negative is the attitude of Herod: he is afraid that the Child will take away his power. He calls the Magi and has them tell him when the star appeared to them, then he sends them to Bethlehem saying: "Go and find out all about the child and, when you have found him, let me know, so that I too may go and do him homage". In reality, Herod wants to know where the child is, not to do him homage, but to eliminate him, because he considers him a rival. See how fear provokes hypocrisy. Hypocrites are the way they are because they have fear in their hearts.
These are the three attitudes we find in the Gospel: careful searching, indifference, fear. And we too must choose which of the three to adopt.
Selfishness can lead us to consider the coming of Jesus in our lives as a threat. So we try to suppress or silence Jesus’ message. When we follow human ambitions, the most comfortable perspectives, the inclinations of evil, we perceive Jesus as an obstacle.
On the other hand, the temptation of indifference is always present. Even if we know that Jesus is the Saviour, we prefer to live as if He were not: instead of behaving coherently with our Christian faith, we follow the rules of the world, which tend to satisfy our inclination to arrogance, our thirst for power and money.

Instead, we are called to follow the example of the Magi: to be careful in our search, ready to go out of our way to meet Jesus in our lives. Search for him in order to worship him, to recognize that He is our Lord, the One who indicates the true way to follow. If we have this attitude, Jesus really saves us, and we can live a beautiful life, we can grow in faith, hope and love for God and our brothers and sisters.        
We invoke the intercession of Mary Most Holy, the star of pilgrim humanity in time. With her maternal help, may every person find Christ, the Light of Truth, and may the world go forward along the path of justice and peace.

Remarks after the Angelus
Following the Angelus Prayer, the Pope greeted different groups present in St Peter’s Square. Here is the full text of his remarks:
Dear brothers and sisters.
Some Eastern, Catholic and Orthodox Churches celebrate Christmas at this time. I greet especially the Orthodox Copts and my Brother Tawadros whom I congratulate on the joyous occasion of the inauguration of the new Cathedral in Cairo. I extend my best wishes to all these Churches: may this joyful celebration be a source of new spiritual vigor and communion among all of us Christians, who recognize Him as our Lord and Saviour.         
Epiphany is marks Youth Mission Day, which this year invites young missionaries to make the gaze of Jesus their own, so that it may guide of their commitment to prayer, fraternity and sharing with needy young people of their age.         
I extend my cordial greeting to all of you, individual pilgrims, families, parish groups and associations, coming from Italy and different countries. In particular, I greet the faithful of Lavello and those of San Martino in Rio, the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Apparition, and the confirmation candidates from Bonate Sotto and Romano di Lombardia.         
A greet especially the historical-folklore parade that promotes the values ​​of Epiphany and that this year is dedicated to the territory of the Prenestini Mountains. I would also like to mention the procession of the Magi that takes place in many places in Poland and that sees the great participation of families and associations.         
I wish everyone a happy feast-day. Please do not forget to pray for me. Enjoy your lunch and goodbye!

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Sat. January 6, 2018 - #Eucharist


Christmas Weekday
Lectionary: 209

Reading 11 JN 5:5-13

Beloved:
Who indeed is the victor over the world
but the one who believes that Jesus is the Son of God?

This is the one who came through water and Blood, Jesus Christ,
not by water alone, but by water and Blood.
The Spirit is the one who testifies,
and the Spirit is truth.
So there are three that testify,
the Spirit, the water, and the Blood,
and the three are of one accord.
If we accept human testimony,
the testimony of God is surely greater.
Now the testimony of God is this,
that he has testified on behalf of his Son.
Whoever believes in the Son of God
has this testimony within himself.
Whoever does not believe God has made him a liar
by not believing the testimony God has given about his Son.
And this is the testimony:
God gave us eternal life,
and this life is in his Son.
Whoever possesses the Son has life;
whoever does not possess the Son of God does not have life.

I write these things to you so that you may know
that you have eternal life,
you who believe in the name of the Son of God.

Responsorial PsalmPS147:12-13, 14-15, 19-20

R. (12a) Praise the Lord, Jerusalem.
or:
R. Alleluia.
Glorify the LORD, O Jerusalem;
praise your God, O Zion.
For he has strengthened the bars of your gates;
he has blessed your children within you.
R. Praise the Lord, Jerusalem.
or:
R. Alleluia.
He has granted peace in your borders;
with the best of wheat he fills you.
He sends forth his command to the earth;
swiftly runs his word!
R. Praise the Lord, Jerusalem.
or:
R. Alleluia.
He has proclaimed his word to Jacob,
his statutes and his ordinances to Israel.
He has not done thus for any other nation;
his ordinances he has not made known to them. Alleluia.
R. Praise the Lord, Jerusalem.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Alleluia SEE MK 9:6

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
The heavens were opened and the voice of the Father thundered:
This is my beloved Son. Listen to him.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMK 1:7-11

This is what John the Baptist proclaimed:
"One mightier than I is coming after me.
I am not worthy to stoop and loosen the thongs of his sandals.
I have baptized you with water;
he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit."

It happened in those days that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee
and was baptized in the Jordan by John.
On coming up out of the water he saw the heavens being torn open
and the Spirit, like a dove, descending upon him.
And a voice came from the heavens,
"You are my beloved Son; with you I am well pleased."

or

LK 3:23-38 OR 3:23, 31-34, 36, 38

When Jesus began his ministry he was about thirty years of age.
He was the son, as was thought, of Joseph, the son of Heli,
the son of Matthat, the son of Levi, the son of Melchi,
the son of Jannai, the son of Joseph, the son of Mattathias,
the son of Amos, the son of Nahum, the son of Esli,
the son of Naggai, the son of Maath, the son of Mattathias,
the son of Semein, the son of Josech, the son of Joda,
the son of Joanan, the son of Rhesa, the son of Zerubbabel,
the son of Shealtiel, the son of Neri, the son of Melchi,
the son of Addi, the son of Cosam, the son of Elmadam,
the son of Er, the son of Joshua, the son of Eliezer,
the son of Jorim, the son of Matthat, the son of Levi,
the son of Simeon, the son of Judah, the son of Joseph,
the son of Jonam, the son of Eliakim, the son of Melea,
the son of Menna, the son of Mattatha, the son of Nathan,
the son of David, the son of Jesse, the son of Obed,
the son of Boaz, the son of Sala, the son of Nahshon,
the son of Amminadab, the son of Admin, the son of Arni,
the son of Hezron, the son of Perez, the son of Judah,
the son of Jacob, the son of Isaac, the son of Abraham,
the son of Terah, the son of Nahor, the son of Serug,
the son of Reu, the son of Peleg, the son of Eber,
the son of Shelah, the son of Cainan, the son of Arphaxad,
the son of Shem, the son of Noah, the son of Lamech,
the son of Methuselah, the son of Enoch, the son of Jared,
the son of Mahalaleel, the son of Cainan, the son of Enos,
the son of Seth, the son of Adam, the son of God.

or

When Jesus began his ministry he was about thirty years of age.
He was the son, as was thought, of Joseph, the son of Heli,
the son of Melea, the son of Menna, the son of Mattatha,
the son of Nathan, the son of David, the son of Jesse,
the son of Obed, the son of Boaz, the son of Sala,
the son of Nahshon, the son of Amminadab, the son of Admin,
the son of Arni, the son of Hezron, the son of Perez,
the son of Judah, the son of Jacob, the son of Isaac,
the son of Abraham, the son of Terah, the son of Nahor,
the son of Cainan, the son of Arphaxad, the son of Shem,
the son of Noah, the son of Lamech, the son of Enos,
the son of Seth, the son of Adam, the son of God.

3 Kings Cake Recipe for Epiphany - Traditional #German #Epiphany #Recipe


A Traditional Cake for Epiphany, German recipe

INGREDIENTS 
 2 Cups and 3 Tablespoons of Flour 
1.4 Ounces of Yeast (Fresh)
1/3 Cup of Sugar
2/4 Cup of Milk
7 Tablespoons of melted Butter
1/2 teaspoon Salt
1 Lemon chopped
1/2 teaspoon of Cardamon
2 Eggs (1 Separated)
1/2 Cup of Rum soaked Raisins
1 Cup of dried chopped Fruit

Instructions
In a large mixing bowl pour in 3/4 of the flour leaving a hole in the middle. Mix the yeast with a pinch of sugar and some of the lukewarm milk. Place the yeast mixture in the hole and cover with a towel. Let sit for 1/4 an hour in a warm place. Afterwards, add the butter, salt, lemon, cardamon, eggs, milk and flour to the mixture. Knead dough until smooth.
Once a ball of dough is formed add the remaining raisins and fruit. Knead entire mixture and make a log and divide into four balls.
Place in a greased spring-form pan with a tube. Cover with a cloth and let rise for 20 minutes in a warm place. Brush dough with a beaten egg yolk and place in the oven at 350 F. Bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown. Cool cake before removing from pan.
When cooled frost the cake with 2 Tablespoons of Icing Sugar mixed with 2 Tablespoons of Lemon Juice. Decorate with candied cherries.
Traditionally, a golden crown is placed on top of the cake.