Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Saint January 11 : St. Theodosius the Cenobiarch : #Abbot and #Founder


Born:
423 at Garissus, Cappadocia (modern Turkey)
Died:
529 at Cathismus

St Theodosius was born at Mogariassus, called in latter ages Marissa, in Cappadocia, in 423. He imbibed the first tincture of virtue from the fervent example and pious instructions of his virtuous parents. He was ordained reader, but some time after being moved by Abraham's example to quit his country and friends, he resolved to put this motion in execution. He accordingly set out for Jerusalem, but went purposely out of his road to visit the famous St. Simeon Stylites on his pillar, who foretold him several circumstances of his life, and gave him proper instructions for his behaviour in each. Having satisfied his  devotion in visiting the holy places in Jerusalem, he began to consider in what manner he should dedicate himself to God in a religious state. The dangers of living without a guide made him prefer a monastery to a hermitage; and he therefore put himself under the directions of a holy man named Longinus, to whom his virtue soon endeared him in a very particular manner. A pious lady having built a church under the invocation of the Blessed Virgin, on the high road to Bethlehem, Longinus could not well refuse her request that his pupil should undertake the charge of it; but Theodosius, who loved only to obey, could not be induced by any entreaties to consent to this proposal: absolute commands were necessary to force him to a compliance. Nor did he govern long; for dreading the poison of vanity from the esteem of men, he retired into a cave at the top of a neighbouring desert mountain, and employed his time in fasting, watching, prayers, and tears, which almost continually flowed from his eyes. His food was coarse pulse and wild herbs: for thirty years he never tasted so much as a morsel of bread. Many desired to serve God under his direction: he at first determined only to admit six or seven, but was soon obliged to receive a greater number, and at length came to a resolution, which charity extorted from him, never to reject any that presented themselves with dispositions that seemed sincere. The first lesson which he taught his monks was that the continual remembrance of death is the foundation of religious perfection; to imprint this more deeply in their minds, he caused a great grave or pit to be dug, which might serve for the common burial-place of the whole community, that by the presence of this memorial of death, and by continually meditating on that object, they might more perfectly learn to die daily. The burial-place being made, the abbot one day, when he had led his monks to it, said, The grave is made, who will first perform the dedication?" Basil, a priest, who was one of the number, falling on his knees, said to St. Theodosius, "I am the person, be pleased to give me your blessing." The abbot ordered the prayers of the church for the dead to be offered up for him, and on the fortieth day Basil wonderfully departed to our Lord in peace without any apparent sickness. When the holy company of disciples were twelve in number it happened that at the great feast at Easter they had nothing to eat; they had not even bread for the sacrifice: some murmured; the saint bid them trust in God and he would provide; which was soon remarkably verified by the arrival of certain mules loaded with provisions. The lustre of the sanctity and miracles of St. Theodosius drawing great numbers to him who desired to serve God under his direction, his cave was too little for their reception, therefore, having consulted heaven by prayer, he, by its particular direction, built a spacious monastery at a place called Cathismus, not far from Bethlehem, at a small distance from his cave, and it was soon filled with holy monks. To this monastery were annexed three infirmaries: one for the sick, the gift of a pious lady in that neighbourhood; the two others St. Theodosius built himself, one for the aged and feeble, the other for such as had been punished with the loss of their senses, or by falling under the power of the devil, for rashly engaging in a religious state through pride, and without a due dependence on the grace of God to carry them through it. All succours, spiritual and temporal, were afforded in these infirmaries, with admirable order, care, and affection. He erected also several buildings for the reception of strangers, in which he exercised an unbounded hospitality, entertaining all that came, for whose use there were one day above a hundred tables served with provisions: these, when insufficient for the number of guests, were more than once miraculously multiplied by his prayers. The monastery itself was like a city of saints in the midst of a desert, and in it reigned regularity, silence, charity, and peace. There were four churches belonging to it, one for each of the three several nations of which his community was chiefly composed, each speaking a different language; the fourth was for the use of such as were in a state of penance, which those that recovered from their lunatic or possessed condition before-mentioned, were put into, and detained till they had expiated their fault. The nations into which his community was divided were the Greeks, which was by far the most numerous, and consisted of all those that came from any provinces of the empire; the Armenians, with whom were joined the Arabians and Persians; and, thirdly, the Bessi, who comprehended all the northern nations below Thrace, or all who used the Runic or Sclavonian tongue. Each nation sung the first part of the mass to the end of the gospel in their own church, but after the gospel all met in the church of the Greeks, where they celebrated the essential part of the sacrifice in Greek, and communicated all together.
The monks passed a considerable part of the day and night at their devotions in the church, and at the times not set apart for public prayer and necessary rest every one was obliged to apply himself to some trade or manual labour, not incompatible with recollection that the house might be supplied with conveniences. Sallust, Bishop of Jerusalem, appointed St. Sabas superior general of the hermits and our saint of the Cenobites, or religious men living in community throughout all Palestine, whence he was styled the Cenobiarch. These two great servants of God lived in strict friendship, and had frequent spiritual conferences together; they were also united in their zeal and sufferings for the church.
The Emperor Anastasius patronised the Eutychian heresy, and used all possible means to engage our saint in his party. In 513 he deposed Elias, Patriarch of Jerusalem, as he had banished Flavian II, Patriarch of Antioch, and intruded Severus, an impious heretic, into that see, commending the Syrians to obey and hold communion with him. SS. Theodosius and Sabas maintained boldly the right of Elias, and of John his successor; whereupon the imperial officers thought it most advisable to connive at their proceedings, considering the great authority they had acquired by their sanctity. Soon after, the emperor sent Theodosius a considerable sum of money, for charitable uses in appearance, but in reality to engage him in his interest. The saint accepted of it, and distributed it all among the poor. Anastasius, now persuading himself that he was as good as gained over to his cause, sent him a heretical profession of faith, in which the divine and human natures in Christ were confounded into one, and desired him to sign it. The saint wrote him an answer full of apostolic spirit; in which, besides solidly confuting the Eutychian error, he added that he was ready to lay down his life for the faith of the church. The emperor admired his courage and the strength of his reasoning, and, returning him a respectful answer, highly commended his generous zeal, made some apology for his own inconsiderateness, and protested that he only desired the peace of the church. But it was not long ere he relapsed into his former impiety, and renewed his bloody edicts against the orthodox, dispatching troops everywhere to have them put in execution. On the first intelligence of this, Theodosius went over  all the deserts and country of Palestine, exhorting every one to be firm in the faith of the four general councils. At Jerusalem, having assembled the people together, he from the pulpit cried out with a loud voice: "If any one receives not the four general councils as the four gospels, let him be anathema." So bold an action in a man of his years inspired with courage those whom the edicts had terrified. His discourses had a wonderful effect on the people, and God gave a sanction to his zeal by miracles: one of these was, that on his going out of the church at Jerusalem, a woman was healed of a cancer on the spot by only touching his garments. The emperor sent an order for his banishment, which was executed; but, dying soon after, Theodosius was recalled by his catholic successor, Justin, who, from a common soldier, had gradually ascended the imperial throne.
Our saint survived his return eleven years, never admitting the least relaxation in his former austerities. Such was his humility that, seeing two monks at variance with each other, he threw himself at their feet, and would not rise till they were perfectly reconciled; and once having excommunicated one of his subjects for a crime, who contumaciously pretended to excommunicate him in his turn, the saint behaved as if he had been really excommunicated, to gain the sinner's soul by this unprecedented example of submission, which had the desired effect. During the last year of his life he was afflicted with a painful distemper, in which he gave proof of a heroic patience, and an entire submission to the will of God. Perceiving the hour of his dissolution at hand, he gave his last exhortations to his disciples, and foretold many things, which accordingly came to pass after his death; this happened in the one hundred and fifth year of his age, and of our Lord 529. Peter, Patriarch of Jerusalem, and the whole country, assisted with the deepest sentiments of respect at the solemnity of his interment, which was honoured by miracles. He was buried in his first cell called the Cave of the Magi, because the wise men who came to adore Christ soon after his birth were said to have lodged in it. A certain count being on his march against the Persians, begged  the hair shirt which the saint used to wear next his skin, and believed that he owed the victory which he obtained over them to the saint's protection through the pledge of that relic. Both the Romans and Greek calendars mention his festival on the 11th of January.
It is the opinion of St. Gregory the Great that the world is to some persons so full of ambushes and snares, or dangerous occasions of sin, that they cannot be saved but by choosing a safe retreat. Yet there are some who find the greatest dangers in solitude itself; so that it is necessary for every one to sound his own heart, take a survey of his own forces and abilities, and consult God, that he may best be able to learn the designs of his providence with regard to his soul; in doing which, a great purity of intention is the first requisite. Ease and enjoyment must not be the end of Christian retirement, but penance, labour, and assiduous contemplation; without great fervour and constancy in which, close solitude is the road to perdition. If greater safety, or an unfitness for a public station, or a life of much business (in which several are only public nuisances), may be just motives to some for embracing a life of retirement, the means of more easily attaining to perfect virtue may be such to many. Nor do true contemplatives bury their talents, or cease either to be members of the republic of mankind, or to throw in their mite towards its welfare.
From the prayers and thanksgivings which they daily offer to God for the peace of the world, the preservation of the church, the conversion of sinners, and the salvation of all men, doubtless more valuable benefits often accrue to mankind than from the alms of the rich or the labours of the learned. Nor is it to be imagined how far and how powerfully their spirit, and the example of their innocence and perfect virtue, often spread their influence; and how serviceable persons who lead a holy and sequestered life may be to the good of the world; nor how great glory redounds to God by the perfect purity of heart and charity to which many souls are thus raised.

(Taken from Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler)

#PopeFrancis "May the liturgy be able to become for all of us a true school of prayer." FULL TEXT + Video


The Holy Father’s Catechesis
Dear Brothers and Sisters, good morning!
In the course of the catecheses on the Eucharistic Celebration, we reflected on the Penitential Act that helps us to strip ourselves from our presumptions and to present ourselves to God as we really are, conscious of being sinners, in the hope of being forgiven.
In fact, the gratitude expressed in the “Gloria” comes to life from the encounter between human misery and divine mercy; <it is> “a very ancient and venerable hymn with which the Church, gathered in the Holy Spirit, glorifies and beseeches God the Father and the Lamb” (Ordinamento Generale del Messale Romano, 53).
The beginning of this hymn – “Glory to God in the highest” — takes up the song of the Angels at Jesus’ birth in Bethlehem, joyful proclamation of the embrace between Heaven and earth. This song involves us also, recollected in prayer: “Glory to God in the highest and peace on earth to men of good will.” After the “Gloria,” or when this isn’t, immediately after the Penitential Act, the prayer takes a particular form in the prayer called “Collect,” through which is expressed the character proper of the celebration, variable according to the days and the times of the year (Cf. Ibid., 54). With the invitation “Let us pray,” the priest exhorts the people to recollect themselves with him in a moment of silence, in order to be conscious of being in the presence of God and have arise, in each one’s heart, the personal intentions with which he takes part in the Mass (Cf. Ibid., 54). The priest says “Let us pray”, and then comes a moment of silence, and each one thinks of the things of which he is in need, what he wishes to ask for in prayer.
The silence isn’t reduced to the absence of words, <but> rather in disposing oneself to listen to other voices: that of our heart and, especially, the voice of the Holy Spirit. In the liturgy, the nature of the sacred silence depends on the moment in which it takes place: “During the Penitential Act and after the invitation to prayer, it helps recollection; after the Reading or the homily, it’s a call to meditate briefly on what one has heard; after Communion, it fosters interior prayer of praise and supplication” (Ibid., 4r5). Therefore, before the initial prayer, silence helps to recollect ourselves in ourselves and to think why we are there. See then the importance of listening to our spirit to then open it to the Lord. Perhaps we come from days of toil, of joy, of sorrow, and we want to say it to the Lord, to invoke His help, to ask that He be close to us; we <might> have sick relatives and friends or who are going through difficult trials; we want to entrust to God the fate of the Church and of the world. And for this the brief silence is useful, before the priest, gathering the intentions of each one, expresses in a loud voice to God, in the name of all, the common prayer that ends the Rites of Introduction, doing in fact the “Collect” of the individual intentions. I earnestly recommend to priests to observe this moment of silence and not go in a hurry: “Let us pray,” and that silence be kept. I recommend this to priests. Without this silence, we risk neglecting the recollection of the soul.

The priest recites this supplication, this Collect prayer, with his arms spread, which is the attitude of the worshipper, assumed by Christians from the first centuries  — as the frescoes of the Roman catacombs attest — to imitate Christ with His arms open on the wood of the cross. And there, Christ is the Worshipper and is at the same time the prayer! In the Crucified we recognize the Priest that offers to God the worship that pleases Him, namely, filial obedience.
In the Roman Rite the prayers are concise but rich in meaning: beautiful meditations can be made on these prayers, which are so beautiful! To return to meditate the texts, also outside of the Mass, can help us to learn how to address God, what to ask for, what words to use. May the liturgy be able to become for all of us a true school of prayer.
[Original text: Italian]  [Blog share of ZENIT’s translation by Virginia M. Forrester]

Vatican.va 10 January: Full Text of SPEAKER's SUMMARY:
Dear brothers and sisters: In our catechesis on the Holy Eucharist, we now turn to the Gloriaand the Opening Prayer.  Having confessed our sinfulness and asked God’s forgiveness in the penitential rite, we recite, on Sundays and holydays, the ancient hymn “Glory to God in the highest”.  Echoing the song of the angels at our Lord’s birth, we praise the mercy of the Father in sending his Son who takes away the sins of the world.  The Opening Prayer is also called the “Collect”, because it gathers up and presents to the Triune God all our individual prayers.  The priest’s invitation, “Let us pray”, is followed by a moment of silence, as we open our hearts and bring our personal needs to the Lord.  The Opening Prayer praises the Father’s provident love revealed in history and then implores his continued help as we strive to live as his sons and daughters in Christ.  By ancient tradition, the prayer is addressed to the Father through the Son in the Holy Spirit.  By reflecting on these rich prayers, and uniting ourselves with the Church in lifting them up to God, we see how the liturgy becomes for each Christian a true school of prayer.

#BreakingNews Catholic Patriarchate Attacked with Rockets - Damages to Churches and Christian Homes - Please Pray

Damascus, mortars fall on Christian neighborhoods: several injuries, damage to churches

ASIA NEWS RELEASE:

The Greek-Melkite Catholic Patriarchate was attacked in Haret Al Zeitoun and a Latin parish in Bab Touma. Dozens of shells fell in a few hours. AsiaNews source deny rumors of Christian victims circulated in these hours. On January 21st, a new round of UN talks begins in Geneva.

Damascus (AsiaNews) – Mortar rockets launched from the territories controlled by Syrian rebels hit the Christian neighborhoods of Damascus in recent days, causing injuries and material damage.
The shells hit the  Greek-Melkite Catholic Patriarchate (in the photos), in the district of Haret Al Zeitoun, and the Latin parish of the Conversion of St. Paul, in Bab Touma. An AsiaNews source in the capital, speaking on condition of anonymity, instead denies the news circulated on online of possible victims among the faithful of the community.
Yesterday a shell hit the seat of the Greek-Melkite patriarchate, causing some damage to the structure. In the area, up to 30 mortar rounds fell in a few hours, concentrated in particular in the old city of Damascus and in the (mostly Christian) neighborhoods of Bab Touma, Bab Sharki and Qassa'a.
The day before a mortar reached the district of Bar Touma, in the old city, where there are several churches and Christian buildings. The Latin Church of the Conversion of St. Paul, under the custody of the Franciscans, was hit. The blast also caused some damage to the nearby Maronite cathedral.
The attacks are part of the climate of tension building in the rebel enclave of Goutha East, on the outskirts of the capital.
The AsiaNews source reports that "the attacks on Christian neighborhoods have caused several injuries", but at the moment "there are no victims". There is, however, "massive damage" to "structures, from the houses of the religious to the ecclesiastical offices". These are "mortar shots that are launched without a specific goal" but that in these last days "have concentrated in the areas with a Christian majority". There does not appear to be "a particular project to target Christians, rather to feed tension" after a long period of "relative calm". "This happens - concludes the source - when negotiations intensify or in conjunction with meetings and dialogue between the parties at international level".
Meanwhile, the front of international diplomacy also moves, in an attempt - so far in vain - to put an end to a conflict that broke out in March 2011 and which has caused hundreds of thousands of victims, including civilians, and millions of displaced persons.
Next January 21, a new round of peace talks is scheduled under the auspices of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. According to reports from the opposition chief negotiator Nasr Hariri, the meeting should last at least three days and intends to return to the UN – overshadowed by the Astana talks - a central political role in the attempt to end the conflict.
At the end of January, a round of negotiations sponsored by Russia in Sochi, on the Black Sea, is planned; however, in this case the oppositions front reveals it has "not received " any formal invitation. "We do not know - added Hariri - what the real goal" of Moscow is; to date there are no official decisions about the presence or absence of the anti-Assad front at the meeting.
The Syrian opposition is currently looking to the UN peace summit in Geneva, following last week's meetings in New York with Secretary General Antonio Guterres and Deputy Secretary-General for Political Affairs Jeffrey Feltman. At the meeting the rebel front will present itself "without any initial precondition", confirms Hariri, because "there are no alternatives to Geneva" even if, to date, no real progress has been made.
The last meeting, the eighth at the beginning of December, had no effect and the main obstacle still remains the future of President Bashar al-Assad. Damascus does not intend to deal with the possible withdrawal of the leader, which would open a transition phase that would culminate in a new Constitution and political elections to be held within a few months. (DS)
Text Source ASIA NEWS IT

Head Archbishop of Ireland Releases #ProLife Message " All life, from life in the mother’s womb... is to be welcomed, loved and helped”. FULL TEXT

FULL TEXT message of Archbishop Eamon Martin, Primate of Ireland: My brothers and sisters, as 2018 begins, I wish you, your family and all your loved ones the gifts of hope, love, and “life to the full” in the New Year.
On 1st January this year, the Feast of the Motherhood of Mary, Pope Francis said that calling Mary: “Mother of God” reminds us that, in Jesus, God became a living human being.  God is therefore intimately close to humanity – as close as a child is to its mother in the womb.  This is miraculous, Pope Francis said human beings are “no longer alone”.  God is with us.  In “the frail and infant God resting in his mother’s arms”, we see a “reflection of ourselves” and realise that “humanity is precious and sacred to the Lord”.
Human life is sacred
All human life is sacred.  All human life is precious.  This is why the direct and intentional taking of innocent human life is always gravely wrong.  In his New Year Homily, Pope Francis teaches us that: “to serve human life is to serve God.  All life, from life in the mother’s womb to that of the elderly, the suffering and the sick, and to that of the troublesome and even repellent, is to be welcomed, loved and helped”.
Just before Christmas the Joint Committee on the Eighth Amendment of the Constitution submitted its report to the Oireachtas.  In the name of “modernising healthcare”, the Committee proposes a very liberal abortion regime, including unrestricted access to abortion up to twelve weeks, and, thereafter during pregnancy, very broad grounds for abortion and access to abortion.
In the coming weeks, Oireachtas members will be discussing the possibility of holding a referendum aimed at repealing Article 40.3.3 of the Constitution of Ireland.  This Article – the eighth amendment – gives an undertaking to respect, defend and vindicate the equal right to life of a mother and her unborn child.  Article 40.3.3 reads as follows:
“The State acknowledges the right to life of the unborn and, with due regard to the equal right to life of the mother, guarantees in its laws to respect, and, as far as practicable, by its laws to defend and vindicate that right”.
Article 40.3.3 is a declaration of equality and respect for human life – it represents, at the very foundations and substructure of our laws, a conviction that all human life is equally worth cherishing.  To repeal this Article will leave unborn children defenceless, and completely at the mercy of whatever abortion laws are introduced in Ireland – both immediately, and as will inevitably be further broadened in future years.
Two Lives, One Love!
Today we celebrate Nollaig na mBan, an Irish tradition which marks the contribution that women make to our families and to society.  Women’s lives are precious, to be loved, valued and protected.  Their babies’ lives are precious, to be loved, valued and protected.  Two lives, one love!  Both lives deserve protection from the tragedy and irreversible decision of abortion.
It is falsely claimed that wide access to abortion will mark Ireland out as a “modern” country, placing the needs of women “at the centre”.  Abortion ends the human life of an unborn girl or boy.  It deceives women – and men – by creating a culture where the decision to end the life of an unborn child is portrayed as simply a matter of individual “choice”.
Since the introduction of the 1967 Abortion Act in Britain there have been almost nine million abortions.  One-in-five pregnancies in Britain end in abortion; one-in-four in Sweden.  International experience shows a similar trend elsewhere.  Are these the so-called “modern abortion regimes” that Ireland is seeking to emulate?
When women are in crisis during pregnancy, feeling frightened or isolated, they need to know they are not alone.  A woman facing such a crisis deserves time, compassion, meaningful support and life-affirming alternatives to abortion and its harmful legacy.  Our ambition as a people should be to guarantee genuine care for pregnant mothers, encourage responsible support from fathers, and to truly cherish all children equally.
We should focus our energies and resources on making Ireland the most welcoming country in the world for a woman and her baby in the womb.  Our doctors, nurses, midwives and other care professionals have already helped to earn Ireland’s place as one of the safest countries in the world for mothers and their babies during pregnancy.  Ireland now has an opportunity to give even stronger witness that: we value all life equally; we care for the weakest and smallest, the strongest and healthiest, the youngest, the oldest, and the whole wonderful and beautiful spectrum of life in-between.
Intervention
Regarding medical intervention, Catholic teaching is clear: where a seriously-ill pregnant woman requires medical treatment which may put the life of her baby at risk, such treatments are ethically permissible provided every effort is made to save both the mother and her baby.  Such an intervention would be different from an abortion, which is the direct and intentional taking of the innocent life of the unborn.
Be missionaries for life!
The innate dignity of every human life, from conception to natural death, is a value for the whole of society, rooted in reason as well as in faith.  The Catholic Church, in common with many other people of goodwill, teaches that ending the life of an unborn child, like the taking of any other innocent human life, is always evil and can never be justified.
Brothers and sisters I encourage you to be missionaries for the cause of life.  Remember those words of Pope Francis: “To serve human life is to serve God”.  Speak to your families, your children and grandchildren, friends and colleagues about cherishing the precious gift of life at all times from conception to natural death.  Speak the truth about life, and speak it with love.  Despite the strong pressures to remain silent, do not be afraid to witness to the equality of all life in private conversations and public discussions in the coming months.  As citizens committed to the Common Good, you have a democratic right to make your views known, respectfully, to our public representatives.
The power of prayer
Please pray earnestly with me that Ireland will “choose life” and that the lives of all women and their unborn children will always be loved, valued, welcomed and respected in this country.
Prayer of Pope Francis (Laudato Si‘)
All powerful God, you are present in the whole universe
and in the smallest of your creatures.
You embrace with your tenderness all that exists.
Pour out upon us the power of your love,
That we may protect life and beauty.
Fill us with peace, that we may live
as brothers and sisters, harming no one.
Amen
ENDS
• Archbishop Eamon Martin is Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland.  This pastoral message has been distributed to the parishes of the Archdiocese of Armagh which covers the counties of Louth, Armagh, half of Tyrone and parts of Meath and Raphoe.
Source: catholicbishops.ie

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Wed. January 10, 2018 - #Eucharist


Wednesday of the First Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 307


Reading 11 SM 3:1-10, 19-20

During the time young Samuel was minister to the LORD under Eli,
a revelation of the LORD was uncommon and vision infrequent.
One day Eli was asleep in his usual place.
His eyes had lately grown so weak that he could not see.
The lamp of God was not yet extinguished,
and Samuel was sleeping in the temple of the LORD
where the ark of God was.
The LORD called to Samuel, who answered, "Here I am."

Samuel ran to Eli and said, "Here I am. You called me."
"I did not call you," Eli said. "Go back to sleep."
So he went back to sleep.
Again the LORD called Samuel, who rose and went to Eli.
"Here I am," he said. "You called me."
But Eli answered, "I did not call you, my son. Go back to sleep."
At that time Samuel was not familiar with the LORD,
because the LORD had not revealed anything to him as yet.
The LORD called Samuel again, for the third time.
Getting up and going to Eli, he said, "Here I am.
You called me."
Then Eli understood that the LORD was calling the youth.
So Eli said to Samuel, "Go to sleep, and if you are called, reply,
'Speak, LORD, for your servant is listening.'"
When Samuel went to sleep in his place,
the LORD came and revealed his presence,
calling out as before, "Samuel, Samuel!"
Samuel answered, "Speak, for your servant is listening."

Samuel grew up, and the LORD was with him,
not permitting any word of his to be without effect.
Thus all Israel from Dan to Beersheba
came to know that Samuel was an accredited prophet of the LORD.

Responsorial PsalmPS 40:2 AND 5, 7-8A, 8B-9, 10

R. (8a and 9a) Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
I have waited, waited for the LORD,
and he stooped toward me and heard my cry.
Blessed the man who makes the LORD his trust;
who turns not to idolatry
or to those who stray after falsehood.
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
Sacrifice or oblation you wished not,
but ears open to obedience you gave me.
Burnt offerings or sin-offerings you sought not;
then said I, "Behold I come."
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
"In the written scroll it is prescribed for me.
To do your will, O my God, is my delight,
and your law is within my heart!"
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
I announced your justice in the vast assembly;
I did not restrain my lips, as you, O LORD, know.
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.

AllelluiaJN 10:27

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
My sheep hear my voice, says the Lord.
I know them, and they follow me.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMK 1:29-39

On leaving the synagogue
Jesus entered the house of Simon and Andrew with James and John.
Simon's mother-in-law lay sick with a fever.
They immediately told him about her.
He approached, grasped her hand, and helped her up.
Then the fever left her and she waited on them.

When it was evening, after sunset,
they brought to him all who were ill or possessed by demons.
The whole town was gathered at the door.
He cured many who were sick with various diseases,
and he drove out many demons,
not permitting them to speak because they knew him.

Rising very early before dawn,
he left and went off to a deserted place, where he prayed.
Simon and those who were with him pursued him
and on finding him said, "Everyone is looking for you."
He told them, "Let us go on to the nearby villages
that I may preach there also.
For this purpose have I come."
So he went into their synagogues, preaching and driving out demons
throughout the whole of Galilee.