Sunday, March 25, 2018

Saint March 26 : St. Margaret Clitherow : Patron of #Businesswomen, #Converts, Martyrs











St. Margaret Clitherow
MARTYR
Feast: March 26



Information:
Feast Day:March 26
Born:1556 as Margaret Middleton at York, England
Died:25 March 1586 at York, England
Canonized:25 October 1970 by Pope Paul VI
Major Shrine:The Shambles, York
Patron of:businesswomen, converts,  martyrs
Martyr, called the "Pearl of York", born about 1556; died 25 March 1586. She was a daughter of Thomas Middleton, Sheriff of York (1564-5), a wax-chandler; married John Clitherow, a wealthy butcher and a chamberlain of the city, in St. Martin's church, Coney St., 8 July, 1571, and lived in the Shambles, a street still unaltered. Converted to the Faith about three years later, she became most fervent, continually risking her life by harbouring and maintaining priests, was frequently imprisoned, sometimes for two years at a time, yet never daunted, and was a model of all virtues. Though her husband belonged to the Established Church, he had a brother a priest, and Margaret provided two chambers, one adjoining her house and a second in another part of the city, where she kept priests hidden and had Mass continually celebrated through the thick of the persecution. Some of her priests were martyred, and Margaret who desired the same grace above all things, used to make secret pilgrimages by night to York Tyburn to pray beneath the gibbet for this intention. Finally arrested on 10 March, 1586, she was committed to the castle. On 14 March, she was arraigned before Judges Clinch and Rhodes and several members of the Council of the North at the York assizes. Her indictment was that she had harboured priests, heard Mass, and the like; but she refused to plead, since the only witnesses against her would be her own little children and servants, whom she could not bear to involve in the guilt of her death. She was therefore condemned to the peine forte et dure, i.e. to be pressed to death. "God be thanked, I am not worthy of so good a death as this", she said. Although she was probably with child, this horrible sentence was carried out on Lady Day, 1586 (Good Friday according to New Style). She had endured an agony of fear the previous night, but was now calm, joyous, and smiling. She walked barefooted to the tollbooth on Ousebridge, for she had sent her hose and shoes to her daughter Anne, in token that she should follow in her steps. She had been tormented by the ministers and even now was urged to confess her crimes. "No, no, Mr. Sheriff, I die for the love of my Lord Jesu", she answered. She was laid on the ground, a sharp stone beneath her back, her hands stretched out in the form of a cross and bound to two posts. Then a door was placed upon her, which was weighted down till she was crushed to death. Her last words during an agony of fifteen minutes, were "Jesu! Jesu! Jesu! have mercy on me!" Her right hand is preserved at St. Mary's Convent, York, but the resting-place of her sacred body is not known. Her sons Henry and William became priests, and her daughter Anne a nun at St. Ursula's, Louvain.
Her life, written by her confessor, John Mush, exists in two versions. The earlier has been edited by Father John Morris, S.J., in his "Troubles of our Catholic Forefathers", third series (London, 1877). The later manuscript, now at York Convent, was published by W. Nicholson, of Thelwall Hall, Cheshire (London, Derby, 1849), with portrait: "Life and Death of Margaret Clitherow the martyr of York". It also contains the "History of Mrs. Margaret Ward and Mrs. Anne Line, Martyrs". [Note: St. Margaret Clitherow was canonized by Pope Paul VI in 1970. IMAGE SOURCE GOOGLE IMAGES 

Palm Sunday Mass with Pope Francis "...the joy and the celebration of God’s mercy!" FULL TEXT Homily + Video

OFFICIAL HOMILY OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS
St Peter`s Square
33rd World Youth Day
Sunday, 25 March 2018

Jesus enters Jerusalem.  The liturgy invites us to share in the joy and celebration of the people who cry out in praise of their Lord; a joy that will fade and leaves a bitter and sorrowful taste by the end of the account of the Passion.  This celebration seems to combine stories of joy and suffering, mistakes and successes, which are part of our daily lives as disciples.  It somehow expresses the contradictory feelings that we too, the men and women of today, experience: the capacity for great love… but also for great hatred; the capacity for courageous self-sacrifice, but also the ability to “wash our hands” at the right moment; the capacity for loyalty, but also for great abandonment and betrayal.
We also see clearly throughout the Gospel account that the joy Jesus awakens is, for some, a source of anger and irritation.
Jesus enters the city surrounded by his people and by a cacophony of singing and shouting.  We can imagine that amid the outcry we hear, all at the same time, the voice of the forgiven son, the healed leper, or the bleating of the lost sheep.  Then too, the song of the publican and the unclean man; the cry of those living on the edges of the city.  And the cry of those men and women who had followed Jesus because they felt his compassion for their pain and misery…  That outcry is the song and the spontaneous joy of all those left behind and overlooked, who, having been touched by Jesus, can now shout: “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord”.  How could they not praise the one who had restored their dignity and hope?  Theirs is the joy of so many forgiven sinners who are able to trust and hope once again. And they cry out. They rejoice. This is joy.
All this joy and praise is a source of unease, scandal and upset for those who consider themselves righteous and “faithful” to the law and its ritual precepts.[1]  A joy unbearable for those hardened against pain, suffering and misery.  Many of these think to themselves: “Such ill-mannered people!” A joy intolerable for those who have forgotten the many chances they themselves had been given.  How hard it is for the comfortable and the self-righteous to understand the joy and the celebration of God’s mercy!  How hard it is for those who trust only in themselves, and look down on others, to share in this joy.[2]
And so here is where another kind of shouting comes from, the fierce cry of those who shout out: “Crucify him!”  It is not spontaneous but already armed with disparagement, slander and false witness.  It is a cry that emerges in moving from the facts to an account of the facts; it comes from this “story”.  It is the voice of those who twist reality and invent stories for their own benefit, without concern for the good name of others. This is a false account. The cry of those who have no problem in seeking ways to gain power and to silence dissonant voices.  The cry that comes from “spinning” facts and painting them such that they disfigure the face of Jesus and turn him into a “criminal”.  It is the voice of those who want to defend their own position, especially by discrediting the defenceless.  It is the cry born of the show of self-sufficiency, pride and arrogance, which sees no problem in shouting: “Crucify him, crucify him”.
And so the celebration of the people ends up being stifled.  Hope is demolished, dreams are killed, joy is suppressed; the heart is shielded and charity grows cold.  It is cry of “save yourself”, which would dull our sense of solidarity, dampen our ideals, and blur our vision... the cry that wants to erase compassion, that “suffering with” that is compassion, that is the weakness of God.
Faced with such people, the best remedy is to look at Christ’s cross and let ourselves be challenged by his final cry.  He died crying out his love for each of us: young and old, saints and sinners, the people of his times and of our own.  We have been saved by his cross, and no one can repress the joy of the Gospel; no one, in any situation whatsoever, is far from the Father’s merciful gaze.  Looking at the cross means allowing our priorities, choices and actions to be challenged.  It means questioning ourselves about our sensitivity to those experiencing difficulty.  Brothers and sisters, where is our heart focused?  Does Jesus Christ continue to be a source of joy and praise in our heart, or does its priorities and concerns make us ashamed to look at sinners, the least and forgotten?
And you, dear young people, the joy that Jesus awakens in you is a source of anger and even irritation to some, since a joyful young person is hard to manipulate.  A joyful young person is hard to manipulate!
But today, a third kind of shouting is possible: “And some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples.” He replied, “I tell you, if these were silent, the very stones would cry out”” (Lk 19: 39-40).
The temptation to silence young people has always existed.  The Pharisees themselves rebuke Jesus and ask him to silence them.
There are many ways to silence young people and make them invisible.  Many ways to anaesthetize them, to make them keep quiet, ask nothing, question nothing.  “Keep quiet, you!” There are many ways to sedate them, to keep them from getting involved, to make their dreams flat and dreary, petty and plaintive.
On this Palm Sunday, as we celebrate World Youth Day, we do well to hear Jesus’ answer to all those Pharisees past and present, even the ones of today: “If these were silent, the very stones would cry out” (Lk 19:40).
Dear young people, you have it in you to shout.  It is up to you to opt for Sunday’s “Hosanna!”, so as not to fall into Friday’s “Crucify him!”...  It is up to you not to keep quiet.  Even if others keep quiet, if we older people and leaders – so often corrupt – keep quiet, if the whole world keeps quiet and loses its joy, I ask you: Will you cry out?
Please, make that choice, before the stones themselves cry out.

[1] Cf. R. Guardini, The Lord, Chicago, 1959, 365.


[2] Cf. Apsotolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium, 94.
SOURCE : Vatican.va

Pope Francis "...we learn interior silence, the look of the heart, loving faith to follow Jesus on the Way of the Cross..." FULL TEXT + Video

Before the Angelus:
 [Before the Angelus the Holy Father greeted the representatives of young people that took part in the Pre-Synodal Meeting, who asked to have a group “selfie” with him]
 Have you noticed: today one can’t conceive of a youth who doesn’t take a “selfie” . . . and they did so. They were good!
 Before concluding this celebration, I wish to greet all of you, Romans and pilgrims, who took part, especially the young people from different parts of the world, also those — about 15,000 — that took part linked virtually: I greet all!  Thinking with gratitude of my recent trip to Peru, I greet affectionately the Peruvian community in Italy.
Today’s World Youth Day, which is being held at the diocesan level, is an important stage in the journey towards the Synod of Bishops on Young People the Faith and Discernment of the forthcoming month of October, as well as in the course of preparation for the International Day, which will be held in Panama in January 2019. May the example and the intercession of Mary, the young woman of Nazareth, whom God chose as Mother of His Son, accompany us on this itinerary. She walks with us and guides the new generations in their pilgrimage of faith and of fraternity.
May Mary help us all to live Holy Week well. From her, we learn interior silence, the look of the heart, loving faith to follow Jesus on the Way of the Cross, which leads to the joyful light of the Resurrection.
And before reciting the Angelus, I want to truly thank Cardinal Baldisseri, Monsignor Fabene and the whole Synod’s Secretariat and all the collaborators that helped so much in this week – thank you so much!
Angelus Domini . . .
[Original text: Italian]  [Blog Share of ZENIT’s translation by Virginia M. Forrester]

#BreakingNews Islamic Terrorist Attack in France leaves 3 Dead - RIP to Hero Police Officer who swapped with Hostage

Arnaud Beltrame is a French policeman who swapped with a hostage. Lt-Col Beltrame suffered fatal injuries after volunteering to trade places with a female hostage. The French police officer died saving the lives of hostages in a supermarket siege by an Islamist gunman on Friday. Lt-Col Arnaud Beltrame, 44, was shot and stabbed after he traded places with one of the captives following a shooting spree in southern France. "He gave his life for strangers. He must have known that he didn't really have a chance. If that doesn't make him a hero, I don't know what would," Col Arnaud's brother Cedric told a French radio station on Saturday.  "Even though we were surprised and shocked when we heard what happened we were not surprised in the sense that that's the thing he would do without hesitation," Ms Nicolic (Arnaud's cousin) said. French President Emmanuel Macron also paid tribute to the officer, saying that Col Arnaud "fell as a hero" after showing "exceptional courage and selflessness", adding that he deserved "the respect and admiration of the whole nation".His actions helped bring an end to the siege that left three people dead. The radical Islamist gunman, 25-year-old Redouane Lakdim, was eventually shot and killed by police. Sixteen people were injured, two seriously, in what Mr Macron called an act of "Islamist terrorism". Lakdim was said to have demanded the release of Salah Abdeslam, the most important surviving suspect in the 13 November 2015 attacks in Paris, which killed 130 people. Col Beltrame was a highly-regarded member of the Gendarmerie Nationale and was described by France's president on Saturday as someone who "fought until the end and never gave up". It was in the Medieval town of Carcassonne, where Lakdim began his deadly shooting spree on Friday.  The violence began on Friday morning in Carcassonne, where Lakdim hijacked a car. He killed a passenger - whose body was later found hidden in a bush - and injured the driver. He then shot at a group of policemen who were out jogging, wounding one of them. Edited from BBC
Update:
In an interview with Famille Chr├ętienne, Father Dominique Arz, national chaplain of the gendarmerie, said:
“It turns out that the lieutenant-colonel was a practicing Catholic. The fact is that he did not hide his faith, and that he radiated it, he bore witness to it. We can say that his act of self-offering is consistent with what he believed. He served his country to the very end, and bore witness to his faith to the very end.” 

#BreakingNews Family of 4 Dies in Mexico from Toxic Gas - RIP Sharp Family

 Kevin Wayne Sharp; his wife, Amy Marie Sharp; their son, Sterling, 12; and daughter Adrianna, 7, of Iowa died from inhaling toxic gas while vacationing in Mexico. The bodies were discovered Friday at a rental condominium in the beach town of Tulum.  Autopsies showed they suffocated after inhaling toxic gases. There were no signs of foul play or suicide, officials said. There was no evidence of a disturbance inside the condo.  Authorities performed "physical inspection of the room's gas installation" and are expected to release a technical report at a later date.

What is Palm Sunday? SHARE Awesome Video that shows Jesus died for You! #PalmSunday


PALM SUNDAY OR PASSION SUNDAY is the Sunday before Easter. It commemorates Jesus' entry into Jerusalem on a donkey. The donkey was a symbol of peace. The biblical account can be found in the Gospels:
Now all this was done that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, saying: Tell ye the daughter of Sion: Behold thy king cometh to thee, meek, and sitting upon an ass, and a colt the foal of her that is used to the yoke.

 And the disciples going, did as Jesus commanded them. And they brought the ass and the colt, and laid their garments upon them, and made him sit thereon. And a very great multitude spread their garments in the way: and others cut boughs from the trees, and strewed them in the way: And the multitudes that went before and that followed, cried, saying: Hosanna to the son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord: Hosanna in the highest. And when he was come into Jerusalem, the whole city was moved, saying: Who is this? (Matt. 21: 4-10) Palm leaves are blessed and given out to the congregation at Church. This is a Solemnity in the Church Calendar and the liturgical colors are red for this day. The palms are kept and burned the next year for Ash Wednesday.(Image Share : Google) 


How to fold a Palm into a Cross:
1. Take a palm frond about 1/2 inch wide and 13 inches and hold upright
2. Fold the top down, away from you, and the bottom up, away from you, to form the shaft of a cross of desired length
3. Turn the end down and twist around to the right and across the front of the shaft to make a crossbar in proportion to the length.
4. Fold the end around behind the shaft.
5. Bring the end from behind, under the centre. Fold from the bottom right to the top left and under again from the bottom left to the top right.

6. Fasten the end through the back loops to lock.


#Novena for the Annunciation of Mary - 9 Months for Impossible Requests - #Miracle Prayer to SHARE



















9 MONTH NOVENA FOR
IMPOSSIBLE REQUESTS

(This Novena honours the nine months during which Our Lady carried Our Blessed Lord in her womb.)


"Hail, Holy Queen, 
Mother of Mercy, 
our life, our sweetness and our hope! 
To thee do we cry, 
poor banished children of Eve; 
to thee do we send up our sighs, 
mourning and weeping in this valley of tears. 
Turn then, most gracious advocate, 
thine eyes of mercy towards us; 
and after this our exile, 
show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb Jesus. 
O clement, O loving, 
O sweet Virgin Mary. Amen." 

V - Pray for us, most holy mother of God.
R - That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

"Virgin of the Incarnation, 
a thousand times we greet thee, 
a thousand times we praise thee 
for thy joy when God was incarnated in thee. 
Because thou art so powerful 
a Virgin and Mother of God, 
grant what we ask of thee for the love of God." 

State your first intention.
Repeat above and then state your second intention. 
Repeat above and then state your third intention. 


CONCLUSION:

After the above prayers and intentions, say the Memorare. Remember, O most Gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help or sought thy intercession was left unaided. Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of Virgins, my mother. To thee do I cry, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me. Amen. Hail Mary... Blessed and praised be the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar, in Heaven, on earth and everywhere. AMEN.