Thursday, May 3, 2018

Saint May 4 : St. Florian : Patron of #Firefighters

Saint Florian is the patron saint of firefighters, and many things associated with either fire or water. His feast day is celebrated on May 4. Saint Florian was born in the mid-third century A.D., perhaps around the year 250,somewhere around current-day Austria. He rose through the Roman army ranks to become a commander.
Besides his duties to the military, he was charged with leading the firefighting brigade of the day. Florian was a Christian in a time when the Roman emperors were trying to eliminate Christianity throughout their realm. At one point he was ordered to offer up a sacrifice to the Roman gods, something in which he did not believe.
Other stories state that he refused to participate in the ongoing persecution of Christians, in which the army had been ordered to participate. In either case, Florian's beliefs became known. When questioned, he again stated that he was a Christian.
The popular method of disposing of Christians in that day was to burn them to death, and it was suggested that Florian suffer the same fate. He, however, stated his intention to "climb to Heaven on the flames" of the funeral pyre being prepared for him. The soldiers decided at that point to dispense with him via another route: he was flogged, then flayed, then a large stone was tied around his neck and he was thrown into the Ennis River to drown.
 A faithful lady recovered and buried his body, which was later moved to the Augustinian Abbey of St. Florian, near current-day Linz, Austria. In 1138 some of St. Florian's relics were given to King Casimir of Poland and the Bishop of Cracow. Since his relics arrived in Poland, he has beenregarded as the patron saint of that country. Because of his association with fire, St. Florian is the patron saint of firefighters and chimney sweeps and has been invoked for protection from both fire and water. A statue of St. Florian installed at the front of the main firehouse in Vienna, Austria survived a 1945 bombing with barely a scratch.
Shared from st-florian-medal.com

Wow Benedictine #Nuns release New Album on St. Joseph that will touch your Soul!

The Benedictine Nuns have a newly-released album this by the chart-topping community in rural Missouri who is devoted to the hearts of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph. Mother Cecilia, prioress of the Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles,The Hearts of Jesus, Mary & Joseph at Ephesus was released to coincide with the May 1 feast of St. Joseph the Worker. Funds from the sale of the album will support the construction of the expanding community's priory church, which has $2 million remaining. The album can be purchased from the nuns' website at https://music.benedictinesofmary.org/ or at Amazon. Digital copies are available from iTunes. Mother Cecilia reflected that ICardinal Burke) “His Eminence turned to us and said simply, 'You know what you should do is one to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, the Immaculate Heart of Mary, and the most Pure Heart of St. Joseph.' The album includes 22 tracks, eight of which are original pieces. One of the original compositions, “Hymn to the Three Hearts”, is by a guest composer, Lisa Nardi, and the song includes lyrics written by the sisters at the priory.
 The Nuns were Billboard's Best-Selling Classical Traditional Artist several years in a row, and their albums have topped Billboard's Top Traditional Classical Albums. Sales of The Hearts of Jesus, Mary & Joseph at Ephesus will support construction of the priory church, which was begun in May 2017.
They have Mass daily according to the extraordinary form, and chant the psalms eight times a day from the 1962 Monastic Office.

RIP Fr. Chrstian Mondor, Franciscan, known as the "Surfing Padre" in California at age 92


Rev. Christian Mondor often blessed the California waves during the ceremony called the Blessing of the Waves at the pier in Huntington Beach, California. Father Mondor was known to wear a wetsuit under his clerical robe. He was nicknamed the "Surfing Padre" by locals. Fr. Mondor died Wednesday, two days before his 93rd birthday. He had caught pneumonia. He was part of Saints Simon and Jude Catholic Church in Huntington Beach. There he heard confessions and sang in the choir for nearly three decades. The Rev. Ryan Thornton said, "The community was drawn to him because he had an extraordinary ability to connect with people." Fr. Mondor was a competitive swimmer since he was a boy, but only took up surfing in 1990, in his mid-60s. He gave blessings to surfers before they paddled out in the mornings. Father Mondor started a yearly interfaith prayer service on the sand with a rabbi and other religious leaders. This became known as the Blessing of the Waves and drew thousands of people. Father Mondor explained that the event was to honour St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of the environment.  “We find that the ocean can bring people of all faiths together,” Father Mondor told the Associated Press in 2010. For about 70-years, Father Mondor worked as a priest and teacher across his home state of California, as well as in Oregon and Canada.

Pope Francis Church’s challenge: “to be a fruitful mother, giving birth to children in the faith.” Homily

Pope at Mass: ‘Transmitting the faith is a birth process’
On the Feast of Saints Philip and James, Pope Francis focuses his homily at Casa Santa Marta’s chapel on the characteristics needed to accompany the transmission of the faith.
By Sr Bernadette Mary Reis, fsp
Using the first reading from 1 Corinthians 15:1-8, Pope Francis spoke about the transmission of the faith during his homily on Thursday at Casa Santa Marta. What transmission of the faith is not Transmitting the faith is not to be confused with proselytism, Pope Francis said. The Church is not about looking for cheering fans; neither is it simply reciting the Creed, which is an expression of the faith. Neither is it merely the passing on of information as if it were as easy as: “Here, take this book, study it and then I will baptize you”, Pope Francis said. Faith is not given, it is birthed Rather, transmitting the faith is “rooting the heart in faith in Jesus Christ”, the Pope said. This is the Church’s challenge: “to be a fruitful mother, giving birth to children in the faith.” Grandparents, and parents are especially apt to transmit the faith because they “perfume it with love”, the Pope continued. And he added that care-givers, even if they are foreigners, can also effectively transmit the faith to those whom they care for.

Testimony provokes attraction and curiosity

Quoting Benedict XVI, Pope Francis reminds us that the faith is transmitted when people are attracted by our testimony. At times, that testimony ends in martyrdom. “Testimony provokes curiosity,” he said. It is when others see a consistency in someone’s life that they are led to ask: “Why does so-and-so live like that? Why would a person spend their life in service to others?” “The Holy Spirit uses that curiosity and he goes to work within” the person, Pope Francis said.
The Pope concluded saying, “Transmitting the faith makes us just, it justifies us. The faith justifies us and by transmitting it we give true justice to others”.

Quote to SHARE by St. Mother Teresa "Go out into the world today and love the people you meet. Let your presence light new light in the hearts of people.'


'Go out into the world today and love the people you meet. Let your presence light new light in the hearts of people.' 
St. Mother Teresa

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Thurs. May 3, 2018 - #Eucharist


Feast of Saints Philip and James, Apostles
Lectionary: 561

Reading 11 COR 15:1-8

I am reminding you, brothers and sisters,
of the Gospel I preached to you,
which you indeed received and in which you also stand.
Through it you are also being saved,
if you hold fast to the word I preached to you,
unless you believed in vain.
For I handed on to you as of first importance what I also received:
that Christ died for our sins
in accordance with the Scriptures;
that he was buried;
that he was raised on the third day
in accordance with the Scriptures;
that he appeared to Cephas, then to the Twelve.
After that, he appeared to more
than five hundred brothers and sisters at once,
most of whom are still living,
though some have fallen asleep.
After that he appeared to James,
then to all the Apostles.
Last of all, as to one born abnormally,
he appeared to me.

Responsorial PsalmPS 19:2-3, 4-5

R. (5) Their message goes out through all the earth.
or:
R. Alleluia.
The heavens declare the glory of God;
and the firmament proclaims his handiwork.
Day pours out the word to day;
and night to night imparts knowledge.
R. Their message goes out through all the earth.
or:
R. Alleluia.
Not a word nor a discourse
whose voice is not heard;
Through all the earth their voice resounds,
and to the ends of the world, their message.
R. Their message goes out through all the earth.
or:
R. Alleluia.

AlleluiaJN 14:6B, 9C

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
I am the way, the truth, and the life, says the Lord;
Philip, whoever has seen me has seen the Father.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelJN 14:6-14

Jesus said to Thomas, "I am the way and the truth and the life.
No one comes to the Father except through me.
If you know me, then you will also know my Father.
From now on you do know him and have seen him."
Philip said to him,
"Master, show us the Father, and that will be enough for us."
Jesus said to him, "Have I been with you for so long a time
and you still do not know me, Philip?
Whoever has seen me has seen the Father.
How can you say, 'Show us the Father'?
Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me?
The words that I speak to you I do not speak on my own.
The Father who dwells in me is doing his works.
Believe me that I am in the Father and the Father is in me,
or else, believe because of the works themselves.
Amen, amen, I say to you,
whoever believes in me will do the works that I do,
and will do greater ones than these,
because I am going to the Father.
And whatever you ask in my name, I will do,
so that the Father may be glorified in the Son.
If you ask anything of me in my name, I will do it."

Saint May 3 : St. James the Lesser Apostle - Patron of #Pharmacists

St. James the Lesser
APOSTLE
Feast: May 3


Information:
Feast Day:May 3
Patron of:apothecaries; druggists; dying people; fullers; hatmakers; hatters; milliners; pharmacists
St. James, to distinguish him from the other apostle of the same name, the son of Zebedee, was called the Less; which appellation is supposed to have taken its rise, either from his having been called later to the apostleship than the former, or from the lowness of his stature, or from his youth. He is also known by the title of James the Just, a denomination all agree, with Hegesippus and St. Clement of Alexandria, to have been given on account of his eminent sanctity. He was the son of Alpheus and Mary, the sister of the Blessed Virgin and seems to have been born some years before our Lord. Jesus came with his brethren, and probably St. James among the rest, to settle in Capharnaum, at the beginning of his ministry. James and his brother Jude were called to the apostleship in the second year of Christ's preaching, soon after the Pasch, in the year 31. He was favored with an extraordinary apparition of his Master after his resurrection. Clement of Alexandria says, that Christ being risen from the dead, communicated the gift of science to SS. James the Just, John, and Peter, and that they imparted it to the other apostles. We are told by SS. Jerome and Epiphanius, that our Lord, at his ascension, recommended his church of Jerusalem to St. James; in consequence whereof the apostles, before their dispersion, constituted him bishop of that city. It was probably for a mark of his episcopal authority, and as an ensign of his dignity, that he wore on his head a lamina, or plate of gold, as is recounted by St. Epiphanius. Polycrates, quoted by Eusebius, testifies, that St. John did the same: others relate the like of St. Mark. It was probably done in imitation of the Jewish high-priest.
 St. James governed that church in perpetual dangers, from the fury of the people and their violent persecutions; but his singular virtue procured him the veneration of the Jews themselves. As to his sanctity, Eusebius and St. Jerome give from Hegesippus the following account concerning him: "He was always a virgin, and was a Nazarite, or one consecrated to God. In consequence of which he was never shaved, never cut his hair, never drank any wine or other strong liquor; moreover, he never used any bath, or oil to anoint his limbs, and never ate of any living creature except when of precept, as the paschal lamb: he never wore sandals, never used any other clothes than one single linen garment. He prostrated so much in prayer, that the skin of his knees and forehead was hardened like to camels' hoofs." St. Epiphanius says, that, in a great drought, on stretching out his arms to heaven, he, by his  prayers, instantly obtained rain. His eminent sanctity made even the Jews style him the just man: and Origen observes, that Josephus himself gives him that epithet, though it is not to be found now in Josephus' works. The same reverence for his person procured him the privilege of entering at pleasure into the Sanctum or Holy place, namely, that part of the temple where none but the priests were allowed by the law to enter. St. Jerome adds, that the Jews strove, out of respect, who should touch the hem of his garment. In the year 51, he assisted at the council of the apostles, held at Jerusalem, about the observance of circumcision, and the other legal ceremonies of the law of Moses. Here, after having confirmed what St. Peter said, he devised the sentence which the apostles drew up on that occasion. This apostle being bishop of a church, which then chiefly consisted of Jewish converts, tolerated the use of the legal ceremonies, and, together with others, advised St. Paul to purify himself and offer sacrifice. He is the author of a canonical epistle which he wrote in Greek. It is at the head of those called <catholic>, or universal, because addressed not to any one particular church, but to the whole body of the converted Jews dispersed throughout the then known world. It was penned some time after those of St. Paul to the Galatians, in 55, and to the Romans in 58. It could not, therefore, be written before the year 59, fourteen years after the death of St. James the greater. The author's view in this epistle is to refute the false teachers, who, abusing certain expressions in St. Paul's writings, pretended that faith alone was sufficient to justification without good works: whereas, without these, he declares our faith is dead. He adds excellent precepts of a holy life, and exhorts the faithful not to neglect the sacrament of extreme unction in sickness.
The oriental liturgy or mass, which bears the name of this apostle, is mentioned by Proclus, patriarch of Constantinople, and by the council in Trullo, and is of venerable antiquity. St. Basil, indeed, testifies, that the words of the sacred invocation in the consecration of the bread and of the cup, were not committed to writing, but learned and preserved by tradition down to the fourth century, which was done on a motive of respect and veneration: but other parts of the liturgy were written. Perhaps St. James gave only general directions about this liturgy, upon whose plan it was afterwards drawn up or enlarged. His singular learning in sacred matters is extolled by St. Clement of Alexandria, and St. Jerome.
The Jews, being exasperated at the disappointment of their malicious designs against St. Paul, by his appeal to Caesar, to whom he was sent by Festus, in the year 60, were resolved to revenge it on St. James. That governor, dying before the arrival of his successor, Albinus, this vacancy gave them an opportunity of acting more arbitrarily than otherwise they durst have done. Wherefore, during this interval, Ananus, the high-priest, son of the famous Annas mentioned in the gospels, having assembled the Sanhedrim, or great council of the Jews, summoned St. James and others before it. Josephus, the Jewish historian, says, that St. James was accused of violating the laws, and delivered to the people to be stoned to death. And Hegesippus adds, that they carried him up to the battlements of the temple, and would have compelled him from thence to make a public renunciation of his faith in Christ, with this further view, thereby to undeceive, as they termed it, those among the people who had embraced Christianity. But St. James took that opportunity to declare his belief in Jesus Christ, after the most solemn and public manner. For he cried out aloud from the battlements, in the hearing of a great multitude, which was then at Jerusalem on account of the Passover, that Jesus, the Son of man, was seated at the right hand of the Sovereign Majesty, and would come in the clouds of heaven to judge the world. The Scribes and Pharisees, enraged at this testimony in behalf of Jesus, cried out: "The just man also hath erred." And going up to the battlements, they threw him headlong down to the ground, saying, "He must be stoned." St. James, though very much bruised by his fall, had strength enough to get upon his knees, and in this posture, lifting up his eyes to heaven, he begged of God to pardon his murderers, seeing that they knew not what they did. The rabble below received him with showers of stones, and at last a fuller gave him a blow on the head with his club, such as is used in dressing of cloths, after which he presently expired. This happened on the festival of the Pasch, the 10th of April, in the year of Christ 62, the seventh of Nero. He was buried near the temple, in the place in which he was martyred, where a small column was erected. Such was the reputation of his sanctity, that the Jews attributed to his death the destruction of Jerusalem, as we read in St. Jerome, Origen, and Eusebius, who assure us that Josephus himself declared it in the genuine editions of his history. Ananus put others to death for the same cause, but was threatened for this very fact by Albinus, and deposed from the high-priesthood by Agrippa. The episcopal throne of St. James was shown with respect at Jerusalem, in the fourth century. His relics are said to have been brought to Constantinople about the year 572. Lives of the Saints - Butler