Sunday, July 1, 2018

Are you Traveling? #Prayer to St. Christopher for #SafeTravels and #Motorists - #Driving Prayers to SHARE

Saint Christopher Prayer"Motorist's Prayer:" Grant me, O Lord, a steady hand and watchful eye, that no one shall be hurt as I pass by. Thou gavest life, I pray no act of mine may take away or mar that gift of Thine. Shelter those, dear Lord, who bear my company from the evils of fire and all calamity.Teach me to use my car for others need; Nor miss through love of undue speed. The beauty of the world; that thus I may with joy and courtesy go on my way. St. Christopher, holy patron of travelers, protect me, and lead me safely to my destiny.
Saint Christopher's Protection Prayer
 Dear Saint Christopher, protect me today in all my travels along the road's way. Give your warning sign if danger is near so that I may stop while the path is clear. Be at my window and direct me through when the vision blurs From out of the blue. Carry me safely to my destined place, like you carried Christ in your close embrace. Amen.


FOR  BREAKING NEWS, INSPIRATIONAL STORIES AND FREE MOVIES

 St. Christopher's Prayer
O Glorious St. Christopher you have inherited a beautiful name, Christbearer, as a result of the wonderful legend that while carrying people across a raging stream you also carried the Child Jesus. Teach us to be true Christbearers to those who do not know Him. Protect all of us that travel both near and far and petition Jesus to be with us always. Amen.

Pope Francis "....Jesus .... has brought us the infinite mercy of the Father." FULL TEXT at #Angelus + Video

POPE FRANCIS

ANGELUS

St. Peter's Square
Sunday, 1 July 2018

Dear brothers and sisters, good morning!

The Gospel of this Sunday (cf. Mk 5,21-43) presents two prodigies worked by Jesus, describing them almost as a sort of triumphal march towards life.

First the Evangelist tells of a certain Giairo, one of the synagogue leaders, who comes to Jesus and begs him to go to his house because his twelve-year-old daughter is dying. Jesus accepts and goes with him; but, along the way, comes the news that the girl is dead. We can imagine that dad's reaction. But Jesus tells him: "Do not be afraid, only have faith!" (V. 36). Arrived at the house of Jairus, Jesus brings out the weeping people - there were also the women who were screaming loudly - and enters the room only with the parents and the three disciples, and addressing the deceased says: «Maiden, I say to you: get up ! "(V.41). And immediately the girl gets up, as if waking up from a deep sleep (see v. 42).

Inside the story of this miracle, Mark inserts another: the healing of a woman who suffered from bleeding and was healed as soon as she touched Jesus' mantle (see verse 27). Here strikes the fact that the faith of this woman attracts - I want to say "steal" - the divine saving power that exists in Christ, who, feeling that a force "had come out of him", tries to understand who has been. And when the woman, with so much shame, comes forward and confesses everything, He tells her: «Daughter, your faith has saved you» (v.34).

These are two interlocking stories, with a single center: faith; and show Jesus as the source of life, as the one who gives back life to those who trust him fully. The two protagonists, the father of the girl and the sick woman, are not disciples of Jesus and yet they are fulfilled for their faith. They have faith in that man. From this we understand that everyone is admitted on the path of the Lord: no one should feel like an intruder, an abusive person or someone who has no right. To have access to his heart, to the heart of Jesus, there is only one requirement: to feel in need of healing and to entrust himself to Him. I ask you: does each one of you feel in need of healing? Of something, some sin, some problem? And, if you hear this, do you have faith in Jesus? These are the two requisites to be healed, to have access to his heart: to feel in need of healing and to rely on Him. Jesus goes to discover these people in the crowd and removes them from anonymity, free them from the fear of living and daring. He does it with a look and with a word that puts them on the road after so much suffering and humiliation. We too are called to learn and to imitate these words that liberate and these looks that give back, to those without it, the desire to live.

In this Gospel page the themes of faith and of the new life that Jesus came to offer to all intertwine. Entering the house where the girl lies dead, He drives out those who are agitating and making lament (see verse 40) and says: "The child is not dead, she is asleep" (v. 39). Jesus is the Lord, and before Him physical death is like a sleep: there is no reason to despair. Another is death to be afraid of: that of the heart hardened by evil! Of that yes, we must be afraid! When we feel that our hearts are hardened, our hearts harden and, I allow myself the word, the mummified heart, we must be afraid of this. This is the death of the heart. But even sin, even the mummified heart, for Jesus is never the last word, because He has brought us the infinite mercy of the Father. And even if we fell down, his soft and strong voice reaches us: "I tell you: get up!" It is beautiful to hear that word of Jesus addressed to each one of us: "I tell you: stand up! Go. Get up, be brave, get up! " And Jesus restores life to the girl and gives life back to the healed woman: life and faith to both.

We ask the Virgin Mary to accompany our journey of faith and concrete love, especially towards those in need. And let us invoke her maternal intercession for our brothers who suffer in body and spirit.

After the Angelus

Dear brothers and sisters,

renewing my prayer for the beloved people of Nicaragua, I would like to join the efforts made by the Bishops of the country and many people of good will, in their role of mediation and witness for the ongoing process of national dialogue on the road to democracy .

The situation in Syria remains serious, especially in the province of Daraa, where military actions in recent days have also hit schools and hospitals, and have caused thousands of new refugees. I renew, together with the prayer, my appeal because the population, already hard tried for years, are spared further suffering.

In the midst of so many conflicts, it is right to point out an initiative that can be defined as historical - and it can also be said that it is good news: these days , after twenty years, the governments of Ethiopia and Eritrea have returned to talk about peace together. May this meeting light a light of hope for these two countries of the Horn of Africa and for the entire African continent. I also assure my prayers for the young people who have been missing for over a week in an underground cave in Thailand. Next Saturday I will go to Bari, together with many Heads of Churches and Christian Communities of the Middle East. We will live a day of prayer and reflection on the ever dramatic situation of that region, where so many of our brothers and sisters in the faith continue to suffer, and we will implore one voice: "Peace be upon you" (Ps 122: 8). I ask everyone to accompany this pilgrimage of peace and unity with prayer. I address my greeting to all of you, Romans and pilgrims. I greet in particular the faithful who came from Portugal and the priests of the Sacerdos Institute of the Pontifical University Regina Apostolorum; as well as the Franciscan Sisters of Penance and Christian Charity from Poland, and the faithful of Iraq. I greet the parish groups and associations; the Missionary Sisters of Our Lady of the Apostles, the youth group of the pastoral unit of Gallio, the diocese of Padua, the young democrats of the parish Maria Himmelfahrt in Schattdorf and the spiritual family of the Most Precious Blood of Christ, to whom it is especially dedicated the month of July. I wish everyone a good Sunday. Please do not forget to pray for me. Good lunch and goodbye!
Source: Vatican.va (Unofficial Translation from Italian)

List of Canadian Saints who have Shaped the Life of the Catholic Church


The Saints and Blesseds of Canada

A number of men and women have, in some particular way, shaped the life of the Church in Canada. Some gave their lives to ensure that the Good News be heard throughout North America. Others, out of steadfast faith and profound love dedicated their lives to the service of their brothers and sisters, whom very often were among the most underprivileged.

Declared saint, blessed or venerable by the Popes over the years, these extraordinary people are lights on the journey and examples of holiness and charity that Catholics can follow.
The North American Martyrs
St. Jean de Brebeuf (1593-1649)
St. Noël Chabanel (1613–1649)
St. Anthony Daniel (1601–1648)
St. Charles Garnier (1605–1649)
St. Isaac Jogues (1602–1646)
St. Gabriel Lalemant (1610–1649)
St. René Goupil (1607–1642)
St. Jean de Lalande (????-1646)

The North American Martyrs were a group of six Jesuit priests and two associates who worked selflessly as missionaries to the Hurons in the colonial days of New France. Having been martyred for their faith, they were canonized by Pope Pius XI on June 29, 1930. Their feast day is celebrated in Canada on September 26.
Marguerite Bourgeoys established the first school in Ville-Marie (present-day Montreal) and founded the Congregation of Notre Dame, an order of religious women, largely responsible for bringing Christian education to many areas of the New World. She worked tirelessly to ensure the rights and welfare of women and children in New France and to guarantee that young people received an education. Canonized by Pope John Paul II on October 31, 1982, her feast day is celebrated in Canada on January 12.
Marguerite d’Youville was instrumental in setting up hospitals in Montreal with the help of the Grey Nuns (Sisters of Charity), an order of religious women that she founded. She played a special role in caring for the poor, the elderly, orphans, invalids and the mentally challenged. Her congregation spread across Canada, setting up hospitals. Canonized by Pope John Paul II on December 9, 1990, her feast day is celebrated in Canada on October 16.
Canadian Blesseds
Blessed André Grasset (1758-1792) (French only)
Blessed Marie-Rose Durocher (1811-1849)
Blessed Marie-Léonie Paradis (1840-1912)
Link to the biography of Blessed Marie-Léonie Paradis (PDF)
Link to catechetical resources in English
Link to the website of the Centre of Marie-Léonie Paradis
Blessed Louis-Zéphirin Moreau (1824-1901)
Blessed Frédéric Janssoone (1838-1916)
Blessed Catherine of Saint Augustine (1632-1668)
Link to the biography of Blessed Catherine of Saint Augustine (PDF)
Link to catechetical resources in English Link to the website of the Centre of Catherine of Saint Augustine
Blessed Dina Bélanger (1897-1929)
Blessed Marie-Anne Blondin (1809-1890)
Link to the biography of Blessed Marie-Anne Blondin (PDF)Link to catechetical resources in EnglishLink to the prayer to Blessed Marie-Anne BlondinLink to the website of the Congregation of Sisters of Saint Anne
Blessed Émilie Tavernier Gamelin (1800-1851)
Blessed Nykyta Budka (1877-1949)
Blessed Vasil Velychkovsky (1903-1973)
Link to the biography of Blessed Vasyl Velychkovsky (PDF)Link to catechetical resources in EnglishLink to the website of Bishop Velychkovsky Martyr's ShrineLink to a pamphlet of the Martyr's Shrine (PDF)
Blessed Élisabeth Turgeon (1840-1881)
Link to the biography of Blessed Élisabeth Turgeon (PDF)
Link to catechetical resources in English
Link to the website of the Congregation for the beatification
Link to the video archives of the beatification
Link to the Education Teaching Centre of the Congregation (materials available in English, French and Spanish)
Shared from CCCB

Sunday Mass Online : Sun. July 1st, 2018 - Readings + Video - #Eucharist 13th in Ordinary Time - B


Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 98

Reading 1WIS 1:13-15; 2:23-24

God did not make death,
nor does he rejoice in the destruction of the living.
For he fashioned all things that they might have being;
and the creatures of the world are wholesome,
and there is not a destructive drug among them
nor any domain of the netherworld on earth,
for justice is undying.
For God formed man to be imperishable;
the image of his own nature he made him.
But by the envy of the devil, death entered the world,
and they who belong to his company experience it.

Responsorial PsalmPS 30:2, 4, 5-6, 11, 12, 13

R. (2a) I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.
I will extol you, O LORD, for you drew me clear
and did not let my enemies rejoice over me.
O LORD, you brought me up from the netherworld;
you preserved me from among those going down into the pit.
I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.
Sing praise to the LORD, you his faithful ones,
and give thanks to his holy name.
For his anger lasts but a moment;
a lifetime, his good will.
At nightfall, weeping enters in,
but with the dawn, rejoicing.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.
Hear, O LORD, and have pity on me;
O LORD, be my helper.
You changed my mourning into dancing;
O LORD, my God, forever will I give you thanks.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.

Reading 22 COR 8:7, 9, 13-15

Brothers and sisters:
As you excel in every respect, in faith, discourse,
knowledge, all earnestness, and in the love we have for you,
may you excel in this gracious act also.

For you know the gracious act of our Lord Jesus Christ,
that though he was rich, for your sake he became poor,
so that by his poverty you might become rich.
Not that others should have relief while you are burdened,
but that as a matter of equality
your abundance at the present time should supply their needs,
so that their abundance may also supply your needs,
that there may be equality.
As it is written:
Whoever had much did not have more,
and whoever had little did not have less
.

AlleluiaCF. 2 TM 1:10

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Our Savior Jesus Christ destroyed death
and brought life to light through the Gospel.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMK 5:21-43 OR 5:21-24, 35B-43

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat
to the other side,
a large crowd gathered around him, and he stayed close to the sea.
One of the synagogue officials, named Jairus, came forward.
Seeing him he fell at his feet and pleaded earnestly with him, saying,
"My daughter is at the point of death.
Please, come lay your hands on her
that she may get well and live."
He went off with him,
and a large crowd followed him and pressed upon him.

There was a woman afflicted with hemorrhages for twelve years.
She had suffered greatly at the hands of many doctors
and had spent all that she had.
Yet she was not helped but only grew worse.
She had heard about Jesus and came up behind him in the crowd
and touched his cloak.
She said, "If I but touch his clothes, I shall be cured."
Immediately her flow of blood dried up.
She felt in her body that she was healed of her affliction.
Jesus, aware at once that power had gone out from him,
turned around in the crowd and asked, "Who has touched my clothes?"
But his disciples said to Jesus,
"You see how the crowd is pressing upon you,
and yet you ask, 'Who touched me?'"
And he looked around to see who had done it.
The woman, realizing what had happened to her,
approached in fear and trembling.
She fell down before Jesus and told him the whole truth.
He said to her, "Daughter, your faith has saved you.
Go in peace and be cured of your affliction."

While he was still speaking,
people from the synagogue official's house arrived and said,
"Your daughter has died; why trouble the teacher any longer?"
Disregarding the message that was reported,
Jesus said to the synagogue official,
"Do not be afraid; just have faith."
He did not allow anyone to accompany him inside
except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James.
When they arrived at the house of the synagogue official,
he caught sight of a commotion,
people weeping and wailing loudly.
So he went in and said to them,
"Why this commotion and weeping?
The child is not dead but asleep."
And they ridiculed him.
Then he put them all out.
He took along the child's father and mother
and those who were with him
and entered the room where the child was.
He took the child by the hand and said to her, "Talitha koum,"
which means, "Little girl, I say to you, arise!"
The girl, a child of twelve, arose immediately and walked around.
At that they were utterly astounded.
He gave strict orders that no one should know this
and said that she should be given something to eat.

or

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat
to the other side,
a large crowd gathered around him, and he stayed close to the sea.
One of the synagogue officials, named Jairus, came forward.
Seeing him he fell at his feet and pleaded earnestly with him, saying,
"My daughter is at the point of death.
Please, come lay your hands on her
that she may get well and live."
He went off with him,
and a large crowd followed him and pressed upon him.

While he was still speaking, people from the synagogue official's house arrived and said,
"Your daughter has died; why trouble the teacher any longer?"
Disregarding the message that was reported,
Jesus said to the synagogue official,
"Do not be afraid; just have faith."
He did not allow anyone to accompany him inside
except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James.
When they arrived at the house of the synagogue official,
he caught sight of a commotion,
people weeping and wailing loudly.
So he went in and said to them,
"Why this commotion and weeping?
The child is not dead but asleep."
And they ridiculed him.
Then he put them all out.
He took along the child's father and mother
and those who were with him
and entered the room where the child was.
He took the child by the hand and said to her, "Talitha koum,"
which means, "Little girl, I say to you, arise!"
The girl, a child of twelve, arose immediately and walked around.
At that they were utterly astounded.
He gave strict orders that no one should know this
and said that she should be given something to eat.

Saint July 1 : Saint Junípero Serra : #Missionary


Saint Junípero Serra
MISSIONARY
Feast: July 1 
Information:Feast Day:July 1

Born:
24 November 1713 at Petra, Spanish Majorca
Died:
28 August 1784Beatified:
25 September 1988 by Pope John Paul II 
Born at Petra, Island of Majorca, 24 November, 1713; died at Monterey, California, 28 August, 1784.
Born at Petra, Majorca, Spain, November 24, 1713, a son of Antonio Nadal Serra and Margarita Rosa Ferrer who spent their lives as farmers, Junípero Serra was baptized on the same day at St. Peter’s Church and was given the name Miguel José.
In Petra, Serra attended the primary school of the Franciscans. At 15-years-old, he was taken by his parents to Palma to be placed in the charge of a cathedral canon, and he began to assist at classes in philosophy held in the Franciscan monastery of San Francisco.
Serra was admitted as a novice at the Convento de Jesús outside the walls of Palma on September 14, 1730, and made his profession on September 15, the following year. He chose the name Junípero in memory of the brother companion of St. Francis. He studied philosophy and theology at the Convento de San Francisco. The date of his ordination to the priesthood is not known, though it probably occurred during the Ember Days of December 1738.  Serra obtained his doctorate in theology in 1742 from the Lullian University, Palma. He was called to the Scotistic chair of theology at the same university as primary professor in January 1749 to become an Indian missionary in America.
On April 13, 1749, with Francisco Palóu, Serra sailed for America. He landed in Vera Cruz, Mexico on December 7, 1749. Although horses were supplied for the friars, Serra elected to walk the 250 miles between Vera Cruz and Mexico City. They reached San Fernando College on January 1, 1750, spending the previous night at the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe.
In less than six months, an urgent call came for volunteers for the Sierra Gorda missions. Serra was among the volunteers. During his apostolate in Sierra Gorda with the Pame Indians between 1750 and 1758, Serra not only oversaw construction of a church, which is still in use, but developed his mission in both religious and economic directions. Under his presidency of the missions (1751-1754), the missionaries of the other four towns also built mission churches.  
Serra learned the Otomí language and used a visual method of teaching religion. Zealous in preaching and in promoting both liturgical and popular devotions, he succeeded in bringing the Pame people to practice the faith in an exemplary way. Economically his mission prospered through the introduction of domestic animals, the fostering of agriculture, and the development of commerce. He also defended Indian rights against non-native settlers in a protracted contest over the valley of Tancama. During building operations on his church, he worked as an ordinary day laborer.
He was then assigned to the college of San Fernando, where he arrived September 26, 1758. There he was made choir director, master of novices from 1761 to 1764, college counselor from 1758 to 1761, and a confessor. As a home missionary Serra preached missions in Mexico City, Mezquital, Zimapan, Río Vero, Puebla and Oaxaca. In 1767, he was appointed president of the ex-Jesuit missions of Baja California.
He set out in mid-July and reached Loreto on April 1. Serra resided at the former Jesuit headquarters and assigned missionaries to the 15 missions between San José del Cabo in the south and Santa María in the north. Serra enthusiastically volunteered in 1768 to join expeditions to Upper California. On March 28, 1769, Serra left the mission at Loreto on mule-back, arriving at San Diego on July 1. En route, he founded his first mission at San Fernando de Velicatá on May 14. Serra kept a diary of his journey during which he suffered greatly from an infirmity in his legs and feet and had to be carried on a stretcher.
Serra devoted the next 15 years of his life to evangelical work in Upper California. During that period he founded nine missions: San Diego, July 16, 1769; San Carlos, Monterey-Carmel, June 3, 1770; San Antonio, July 14, 1771; San Gabriel, September 8, 1771; San Luis Obispo, September 1, 1772, San Francisco, October 9, 1776; San Juan Capistrano, November 1, 1776; Santa Clara, January 12, 1777; and San Buenaventura, March 31, 1782. He was present at the founding of Presidio Santa Barbara, April 12, 1782.
Serra remained at San Diego until April 14, 1770, when he embarked for Monterey. From June 3, 1770, until his death, he maintained his headquarters at Mission San Carlos. Serra died at Mission San Carlos, August 28, 1784, at the age of 70 and is buried in the floor of the sanctuary of the church he had built. By the end of 1784, Indian baptisms at the first nine missions reached the number 6,736, while 4,646 Christianized Indians were living in them.
Serra was small of stature, five feet two inches in height. He had a sonorous voice, swarthy skin, dark hair and eyes. Though it appears that he had a fundamentally robust constitution, he suffered a great deal during the latter part of his life. His first affliction was the swelling and painful itching of his feet and legs from mosquito bites which caused varicose ulcers. At times he could neither stand nor walk. After 1758 he began to suffer from asthma. 
In character Serra was eager, optimistic, zealous, dynamic, even adamantine. Primarily a man of action, he preferred the active apostolate to the classroom or to writing. He remained a model religious despite his distractions and activity — a man of prayer and mortification. He had a consuming love for his American converts. He fought for the freedom of the Church against royal infringement. Serra was considered by some too aggressive, zealous, and demanding. Though he defended the Indians, he had a paternalistic view and believed in and practiced corporal punishment.
The cause for Serra’s beatification began in the Diocese of Monterey-Fresno in 1934, and the diocesan process was finished in 1949. On September 25, 1988 he was beatified by Pope John Paul II. Pope Francis canonized Junipero Serra on September 23, 2015. during a Mass in Washington, DC.
Serra monuments and memorials dot his Camino Real from Majorca to California. He is the subject of several dozen biographies in various languages. His writings with translation have been published in four volumes by Rev. Antonine Tibesar, OFM. He is known as the Apostle of California. Serra International was established in his honor. His life and his mission system are studied in California schools.
Edited from the official biography at https://sbfranciscans.org/about/blessed-junipero-serra