Friday, July 27, 2018

Saint July 28 : St. Victor I : 1st #Pope from #Africa - Died 199 AD


St. Victor I
POPE
Feast: July 28


Information:
Feast Day:July 28

(189-198 or 199), date of birth unknown. The "Liber Pontificalis" makes him a native of Africa and gives his father the name of Felix. This authority, taking the "Liberian Catalogue" as its basis, gives the years 186-197 as the period of Victor's episcopate. The Armenian text of the "Chronicle" of Eusebius (Leipzig, 1911, p. 223) places the beginning of Victor's pontificate in the seventh year of the reign of the Emperor Commodus (180-87) and gives it a duration of twelve years; in his "Church History" (V, xxxii, ed. Schwarts, Leipzig, 1902, p. 486) Eusebius transfers the beginning of the pontificate to the tenth year of the reign of Commodus and makes it last ten years. During the closing years of the reign of Commodus (180-192) and the early years of Septimius Severus (from 193) the Roman Church enjoyed in general great external peace. The favourable opinion of the Christians held by Commodus is ascribed to the influence of a woman named Marcia. According to the testimony of Hippolytus ("Philosophumena", IX, 12) she had been brought up by the presbyter Hyacinthus, was very favourably inclined towards the Christians, perhaps even a Christian herself (Hippolytus, loc. cit., calls her philotheos God-loving). One day she summoned Pope Victor to the imperial palace and asked for a list of the Roman Christians who had been condemned to forced labour in the mines of Sardinia, so that she might obtain their freedom. 
The pope handed her the list and Marcia, having received from the emperor the required pardon, sent the presbyter Hyacinthus to Sardinia with an order of release for the Christian confessors. Callistus, afterwards pope, who had been among those deported, did not return to Rome, but remained at Antium, where he received a monthly pension from the Roman Christians. Irenaeus ("Adv. Haerses", IV, xxx, 1) points out that Christians were employed at this period as officials of the imperial Court. Among these officials was the imperial freedman Prosenes, whose gravestone and epitaph have been preserved (De Rossi, "Inscriptiones christ. urbis Romae", I, 9, no. 5). Septimius Severus, also, during the early years of his reign, regarded the Christians kindly, so that the influence of Christian officials continued. The emperor retained in his palace a Christian named Proculus who had once cured him. He protected Christian men and women of rank against the excesses of the heathen rabble, and his son Caracalla had a Christian wet nurse (Tertullian, "Ad Scapulam", IV). Christianity made great advances in the capital and also found adherents among the families who were distinguished for wealth and noble descent (Eusebius, "Hist. eccl.", V, xxi).
Internal dissensions during this era affected the Church at Rome. The dispute over the celebration of Easter . . . grew more acute. The Christians at Rome, who had come from the province of Asia, were accustomed to observe Easter on the 14th day of Nisan, whatever day of the week that date might happen to fall on, just as they had done at home. This difference inevitably led to trouble when it appeared in the Christian community of Rome. Pope Victor decided, therefore, to bring about unity in the observance of the Easter festival and to persuade the Quartodecimans to join in the general practice of the Church. He wrote, therefore, to Bishop Polycrates of Ephesus and induced the latter to call together the bishops of the province of Asia in order to discuss the matter with them. This was done; but in the letter sent by Polycrates to Pope Victor he declared that he firmly held to the Quartoceciman custom observed by so many celebrated and holy bishops of that region. Victor called a meeting of Italian bishops at Rome, which is the earliest Roman synod known. He also wrote to the leading bishops of the various districts, urging them to call together the bishops of their sections of the country and to take counsel with them on the question of the Easter festival. Letters came from all sides: from the synod in Palestine, at which Theophilus of Caesarea and Narcissus of Jerusalem presided; from the synod of Pontus over which Palmas as the oldest presided; from the communities in Gaul whose bishop of Irenaeus of Lyons; from the bishops of the Kingdom of Osrhoene; also from individual bishops, as Bakchylus of Corinth. These letters all unanimously reported that Easter was observed on Sunday.. Victor, who acted throughout the entire matter as the head of Catholic Christendom, now called upon the bishops of the province of Asia to abandon their custom and to accept the universally prevailing practice of always celebrating Easter on Sunday. In case they would not do this he declared they would be excluded from the fellowship of the Church.
This severe procedure did not please all the bishops. Irenaeus of Lyons and others wrote to Pope Victor; they blamed his severity, urged him to maintain peace and unity with the bishops of Asia, and to entertain affectionate feelings toward them. Irenaeus reminded him that his predecessors had indeed always maintained the Sunday observance of Easter, as was right, but had not broken off friendly relations and communion with bishops because they followed another custom (Eusebius, "Hist. eccl.", V, xxiii-xxv.) We have no information concerning the further course of the matter under Victor I so far as it regards the bishops of Asia. All that is known is that in the course of the third century the Roman practice in the observance of Easter became gradually universal. In Rome itself, where Pope Victor naturally enforced the observance of Easter on Sunday by all Christians in the capital, an Oriental named Blastus, with a few followers, opposed the pope and brought about a schism, which, however, did not grow in importance (Eusebius, loc. cit., B, xx). Pope Victor also had difficulties with a Roman priest named Florinus, who probably came from Asia Minor. As an official of the imperial court, Florinus had become acquainted in Asia Minor with St. Polycarp, and later was a presbyter of the Roman Church. He fell into the Gnostic heresy and defended the false learning of Valentine. St. Irenaeus wrote two treatises against him: "On the Monarchy [of God] and that God is not the Author of Evil", and "On the Ogdoad". Irenaeus also called Victor's attention to the dangerous writings of Florinus, who was probably degraded from his priestly functions by the pope and expelled from the Church (Eusebius, "Hist. eccl.", V, xv, 20).
During the pontificate of Victor a rich Christian, Theodotus the Leather-seller, came from Constantinople to Rome and taught false doctrines concerning Christ, Whom he declared to be merely a man endowed by the Holy Ghost, at baptism, with supernatural power. The pope condemned this heresy and excluded Theodotus from the Church. The latter, however, would not submit, but, together with his adherents, formed a schismatic party, which maintained itself for a time at Rome. Victor may also have come into contact with the Montanists. Tertullian reports ("Ad Praceam", 1) that a Roman bishop, whose name he does not give, had declared his acceptance of the prophecies of Montanus, but had been persuaded by Praxeas to withdraw. Duchesne ("Histoire ancienne de l'église", I, 278) and others think Tertullian means Pope Eleutherius, but many investigators consider it more probable that he meant Pope Victor, because the latter had had much to do with the inhabitants of Asia Minor, and because, between 190 and 200, Praceas had gone from Rome to Carthage, where he was opposed by Tertullian. The question cannot be decided positively


SOURCE: the Catholic Encyclopedia

#BreakingNews Catholic Priest Killed in Columbia - RIP Fr. John Fredy Garcia Jaramillo - Age 50

Medellin (Agenzia Fides) – On Wednesday 25, Fr. John Fredy Garcia Jaramillo, 50, was found dead in his home in the neighborhood of Bethlehem Los Almendros, in the south-west part of Medellin. According to the news sent to Agenzia Fides the police believe that his death is the result of a robbery attempt. 
"So far what they have said is that it was a robbery", a relative of the priest said, "because they ransacked the apartment and the safe was open".
Fr. García Jaramillo belonged to the diocese of Apartadó, but worked as a teacher at the "San Ignacio de Loyola" school in Medellín. The priest was known for his social work in the community, where he was carrying out several social projects in the banana region. For the moment, no other details of the murder are known, but there is evidence that violence in the area has increased considerably, bus drivers were killed for robbery last week. (CE) (Full Text Release from Agenzia Fides, 27/07/2018
)

#BreakingNews 2 Heroic Pro-Life Catholic Priests and 2 Pro-Lifers Arrested for Praying inside Abortion Clinic

On July 25, 2018 two heroic pro-life Catholic priests were arrested for praying inside a location abortion facility located in Washington, DC. Father Dave Nix of the Archdiocese of Denver and Father Fidelis Moscinski of the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal, along with two pro-life advocates, were arrested after they prayed inside the abortion facility and offered counselling for women having abortions. Some other pro-life witnesses were outside in the rain, praying, as the four were =taken to jail. The arrests occurred D.C.’s Capital Women’s Services, run by  abortionist Steven Chase Brigham. Brigham has lost his medical license in multiple states for numerous botched abortions and health code violations at his abortion clinics. The pro-life priests were inside the abortion center for about two hours before they were arrested. They are part of the Red Rose Rescue a “ministry of conscience”. This ministry involves peaceful and prayerful activists entering abortion facilities to try to save babies. They counsel pregnant women: offering information to encourage mothers in difficult circumstances to choose life for their child as loving offers of real support are given. “When asked to leave these prayerful rescuers remain at the facility in solidarity with the babies that they may not die alone and unloved. They are willing to risk arrest as another sign of solidarity with the preborn baby who remains helpless,” Monica Miller told LifeNews. “The charitable efforts of the Rescuers are also an attempt to protect the women from the emotional and physical harm that is a real danger in abortion.”  Abortionist Brigham, at this present facility, has had his license to practice medicine revoked in several states and has had women die at his hands. He was even charged with murder in Maryland,” Miller maintained. “Brigham is not licensed to practice medicine in the District of Columbia.” Edited from LifeNews

Pope Francis "... remove the walls of division and to build bridges of fraternity everywhere in the world." FULL Official Text to Ethics Conference


MESSAGE OF THE HOLY FATHER FRANCIS
TO PARTICIPANTS IN THE 3rd INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF
"CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL ETHICS IN THE WORLD CHURCH"
[Sarajevo, 26-29 July 2018]

“A Critical Time for Bridge-Building:
Catholic Theological Ethics Today”

Dear Brothers and Sisters!
I greet all you taking part in this, your third worldwide conference on theological ethics. It takes place in Sarajevo, a city of great symbolic value for the journey of reconciliation and peacemaking after the horrors of a recent war that brought so much suffering to the people of that region.
Sarajevo is a city of bridges. Your meeting is inspired by this dominant motif, which warns of the need to build, in an environment of tension and division, new paths of closeness between peoples, cultures, religions, visions of life and political orientations. I have appreciated this effort of yours from the beginning, when the members of your planning committee visited me in the Vatican last March.
The theme of your meeting is one to which I myself have often called attention: the need to build bridges, not walls. I keep repeating this in the lively hope that people everywhere will pay attention to this need that is increasingly acknowledged, albeit at times resisted by fear and forms of regression. Without renouncing prudence, we are called to recognize every sign and mobilize all our energy in order to remove the walls of division and to build bridges of fraternity everywhere in the world.
The three focal points of your meeting intersect along this journey of bridge building in a critical time like our own. You have given a central place to the ecological challenge, since certain of its aspects can create grave imbalances not only in terms of the relationship between man and nature, but also between generations and peoples. This challenge – as it emerges from the Encyclical Laudato Si’ – is not simply one of many, but the broader backdrop for an understanding of both ecological ethics and social ethics. For this reason, your concern for the issue of migrants and refugees is very serious and provokes a metanoia that can foster ethical and theological reflection, even before inspiring suitable pastoral attitudes and responsible and carefully planned political policies.
In this complex and demanding scenario, there is need for individuals and institutions capable of assuming a renewed leadership. There is no need, on the other hand, for hurling slogans that often remain empty, or for antagonism between parties jockeying for the front position. We require a leadership that can help to find and put into practice a more just way for all of us to live in this world as sharers in a common destiny.
With regard to the question of how theological ethics can make its own specific contribution, I find insightful your proposal to create a network between persons on the various continents who, with different modalities and expressions, can devote themselves to ethical reflection in a theological key in an effort to find therein new and effective resources. With such resources, suitable analyses can be carried out, but more importantly, energies can be mobilized for a praxis that is compassionate and attentive to tragic human situations, and concerned with accompanying them with merciful care. To create such a network, it is urgent first to build bridges among yourselves, to share ideas and programmes, and to develop forms of closeness. Needless to say, this does not meaning striving for uniformity of viewpoints, but rather seeking with sincerity and good will a convergence of purposes, in dialogical openness and the discussion of differing perspectives. Here you will find helpful a particular form of competence, all the more urgent and complex today, to which I referred in the Foreword of the recent Apostolic Constitution Veritatis Gaudium. In mentioning the fundamental criteria for a renewal and a relaunching of ecclesiastical studies, I stressed the importance of “wide-ranging dialogue” (No. 4b), which can serve as the basis for that interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary openness so vital also for theology and for theological ethics. I also pointed to “the urgent need for ‘networking’ between those institutions worldwide that cultivate and promote ecclesiastical studies” (No. 4d).
I encourage you, as men and women working in the field of theological ethics, to be passionate for such dialogue and networking. This approach can inspire analyses that will be all the more insightful and attentive to the complexity of human reality. You yourselves will learn ever better how to be faithful to the word of God which challenges us in history, and to show solidarity with the world, which you are not called to judge but rather to offer new paths, accompany journeys, bind hurts and shore up weakness.
You already have over ten years of experience in building such bridges in your association, Catholic Theological Ethics in the World Church. Your international meetings in Padua (2006) and Trent (2010), your regional meetings on different continents and your various initiatives, publications and teaching activities, have taught you a style of sharing which I trust you will pursue in a way that will prove fruitful for the entire Church. I join you in thanking the officers who have come to the end of their term and those now taking up their responsibilities; I will remember them in my prayers. To all of you I cordially impart my blessing, and I ask you, please, to pray for me.
From the Vatican, 11 July 2018

FRANCIS
Full Official Text share from Vatican.va

Canadian Bishops Statement on 50th Anniversary of Humanae Vitae - "The Joy of Married Love" FULL TEXT


CCCB Marks 50th Humanæ Vitæ with statement
50 years ago, the Encyclical Humanæ Vitæ of Blessed Paul VI was officially promulgated as part of the Magisterium of the Church. To mark this milestone, the Commission for Doctrine of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB) has issued a statement to the Catholic faithful and all men and women of good will entitled The Joy of Married Love.
=Written in an accessible and uplifting style, it aims to inspire and provide encouragement to married couples, highlighting the promise of joy which is at the core of Humanæ Vitæ. This anniversary text also acknowledges the continuing implications of the Encyclical in today’s society as well as its centrality in Pope Saint John Paul II’s Wednesday Audiences on the Theology of the Body and Pope Francis’ post-synodal apostolic exhortation Amoris Lætitia. Approved for public release by the Permanent Council on 21 June 2018, the drafting of the text was undertaken by the Commission for Doctrine in collaboration with the Catholic Organization for Life and Family (COLF). The statement can be accessed in PDF format at the following links.
OR See FULL TEXT Below:
Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops Statement on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the Encyclical Letter Humanæ Vitæ The Joy of Married Love 

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Humanæ Vitæ, Blessed Pope Paul VI’s encyclical on the gift of human life. Although many have misunderstood this encyclical by reducing its message to a “No” to contraception, we reaffirm that the message of Humanæ Vitæ should be seen as an emphatic “Yes!” to the fullness of life promised to us by Jesus Christ (John 10:10). Humanæ Vitæ teaches that, created in the divine image, the human person is called to reflect God’s love in the world, loving the way he does – freely, totally, faithfully, and fruitfully – by means of our body. This is an immense responsibility. The love Jesus has for us allows us to understand better how married love – in what Saint John Paul II called the language of the body – is called to be an image of God’s love: a love which is life-long, exclusive, and ready to reach beyond the couple itself, even bringing forth a new life! This is why Christ has committed himself to husbands and wives in the Sacrament of Marriage. He will always be present to empower them with his infinite love. Through prayer, the Eucharist, and the Sacrament of Reconciliation, spouses will experience the grace to grow in love through life’s everyday challenges. Christian marriage reflects the love of Jesus who lays down his life for us. In his letter to the Ephesians, Saint Paul writes: “‘For this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two will become one flesh’. This is a great mystery, and I am applying it to Christ and the Church” (5:32). Through his incarnation, death, and resurrection, Jesus has united himself to his Bride, the Church, and the two “I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.” John 10:10 Created for love 
MARRIAGE: IMAGE OF CHRIST’S LOVE FOR US 2 
have become “one flesh.” His offering of himself on the Cross is made really present to us in the Eucharist, so that we can experience in our bodies his gift of himself. Christ is the Bridegroom, and we are his bride. When we receive Holy Communion, we make this gift our own and participate intimately in it. Only in union with Christ can we be empowered to make the complete gift of self to which we are all called. Every Christian marriage is therefore called to be an image of this gift of Christ to his people. Since our sexuality is part of how we are made in God’s image, it also should take part in reflecting God’s love. In fact, every expression of love in marriage is meant to be an image of God’s love, including the most intimate expression of marriage – sexual intercourse. In Amoris Lætitia (n. 68), Pope Francis praises Humanæ Vitæ’s teaching on marriage and family, which includes “the intrinsic bond between conjugal love and the generation of life.” This means that every sexual act in marriage is meant to speak a love which is free (not coerced), total (giving one’s whole self), faithful (devoted to one’s spouse), and fruitful (open to new life and supporting the couple’s spiritual fruitfulness). Anything else distorts the beautiful language which God has written into our bodies. Weakening or falsifying this language changes the way each of the spouses experiences love; in these cases, sexual relations do not fully embody real love. While they may be well-intentioned, sexual acts that do not speak the language of such love misdirect our search for love and make it harder for us to find true and enduring love (see Humanæ Vitæ, nn. 12, 14). The Church’s teaching on sexuality reminds us that we are not made for just any kind of love; we are made for an infinite love – the very kind that led Jesus to offer his life freely on 
FALLING SHORT OF THE IMAGE 3 
the cross for us. Nothing less than his infinite love can fill the deepest aspirations of our hearts. Thus, the Church’s teaching is not aimed at repressing our sexual desires or ensuring that each of us ends up living frustrated and boring lives. In fact, the opposite is true. The Church shows us that marriage is the place where sexuality can be fully experienced and lived out. In the words of Blessed Paul VI, “an act of mutual love which impairs the capacity to transmit life which God the Creator, through specific laws, has built into it, frustrates His design which constitutes the norm of marriage, and contradicts the will of the Author of life. Hence to use this divine gift while depriving it, even if only partially, of its meaning and purpose, is equally repugnant to the nature of man and woman, and is consequently in opposition to the plan of God and His holy will” (Humanæ Vitæ, n. 13). Since married love is called to be a reflection of God’s fruitful love, when married couples give themselves to each other totally – growing in communion and open to the blessing of fertility – their love reflects God’s love for us. They see their relationship thereby strengthened and deepened in a true communion – “common union” – with each other. On the other hand, intentionally modifying a sexual act so as to render it sterile – for example through the use of contraceptives or through sterilization – ends up falsifying the language of our sexuality. In this case, we place clear limits on the gift of ourselves while giving the illusion of a total gift. There are many married couples who have adopted fertility awareness-based methods for overcoming infertility and for responsible family planning. Because these methods do not change the language of sexual intercourse in any way, they can help couples grow more deeply in love with each other 
FIDELITY AND OPENNESS TO LIFE 4 
and with God. Based on modern scientific knowledge of fertility, these methods are also known as natural family planning. They allow parents to plan their family in a way which fully respects their love and their dignity (see Humanæ Vitæ, n. 16). As Catholic Bishops, we have been entrusted with the task of proclaiming the truth about God and his plan for our lives, of which sexuality and marriage are an integral part. We invite all Catholics once again to read, study, and meditate on this important encyclical (Humanæ Vitæ) and to rediscover the beautiful truth contained within it. The truth of married love, as it is proposed in Humanæ Vitæ, and later elaborated through Saint John Paul II’s theology of the body and Pope Francis’ teaching in Amoris Lætitia, is not always easy to live out in practice. “Blessed Paul VI, in the wake of the Second Vatican Council, further developed the Church’s teaching on marriage and the family. In a particular way, with the Encyclical Humanæ Vitæ he brought out the intrinsic bond between conjugal love and the generation of life: ‘Married love requires of husband and wife the full awareness of their obligations in the matter of responsible parenthood, which today, rightly enough, is much insisted upon, but which at the same time must be rightly understood… The exercise of responsible parenthood requires that husband and wife, keeping a right order of priorities, recognize their own duties towards God, themselves, their families, and human society’…” (Amoris Lætitia, n. 68, citing Humanæ Vitæ, n. 10). In fact, married couples can only live out the truth contained in Humanæ Vitæ by the grace of God, our loving Father, who with his Son, Jesus, empowers us with the strength of the Holy Spirit. Marriage is indeed a noble vocation. May all married couples, in faithfulness to the grace of their baptism and 
THE JOY OF MARRIED LOVE 5 
marriage vows, live and experience the joy of married love as taught in Humanæ Vitæ and thus be signs of God’s loving presence in the world. Episcopal Commission for Doctrine Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops July 2018

50th Anniversary of Encyclical Humanae Vitae - US Bishops Statement -"....the beautiful truth....Marriage reflects the love of God..."

President of U.S. Catholic Bishops’ Statement on 50th Anniversary of Humanae Vitae

July 25, 2018
WASHINGTON— In honor of the 50th Anniversary of Blessed Paul VI's papal encyclical, Humanae Vitae, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston and President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), has issued the following statement. Originally published in 1968, Blessed Paul VI's letter promotes the whole human person in the context of marital love that respects both the spiritual and physical dimensions of man and woman, which is faithful, generous, and life-giving.
Cardinal DiNardo's full statement follows:
"Fifty years ago, today, Blessed Paul VI issued the Encyclical Humanae Vitae. In it, he reaffirmed the beautiful truth that a husband and wife are called to give themselves completely to each other. Marriage reflects the love of God, which is faithful, generous, and life-giving. Through their vocation, spouses cooperate with God by being open to new human life.
Blessed Paul VI, who bore the criticism of Humanae Vitae with charity and patience, courageously affirmed that when we love as God designed, we experience true freedom and joy. He has also been proven correct in his warnings about the consequences of ignoring the true meaning of married love.
On this anniversary, I encourage all to read and prayerfully reflect upon this Encyclical, and be open to the gift of its timeless truths.
We wait in joyful anticipation for the canonization of Paul VI in October."
For more information and resources on Humanae Vitae, please visit www.usccb.org/HV50.
Rare Video of Pope Paul VI - Blessed Pope Paul VI spoke in English about the preparation of his encyclical "Humanae Vitae" during his general audience July 31, 1968.

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Friday July 27, 2018 - #Eucharist


Friday of the Sixteenth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 399

Reading 1JER 3:14-17

Return, rebellious children, says the LORD,
for I am your Master;
I will take you, one from a city, two from a clan,
and bring you to Zion.
I will appoint over you shepherds after my own heart,
who will shepherd you wisely and prudently.
When you multiply and become fruitful in the land,
says the LORD,
They will in those days no longer say,
"The ark of the covenant of the LORD!"
They will no longer think of it, or remember it,
or miss it, or make another.

At that time they will call Jerusalem the LORD's throne;
there all nations will be gathered together
to honor the name of the LORD at Jerusalem,
and they will walk no longer in their hardhearted wickedness.

Responsorial PsalmJEREMIAH 31:10, 11-12ABCD, 13

R. (see 10d) The Lord will guard us as a shepherd guards his flock.
Hear the word of the LORD, O nations,
proclaim it on distant isles, and say:
He who scattered Israel, now gathers them together,
he guards them as a shepherd his flock.
R. The Lord will guard us as a shepherd guards his flock.
The LORD shall ransom Jacob,
he shall redeem him from the hand of his conqueror.
Shouting, they shall mount the heights of Zion,
they shall come streaming to the LORD's blessings:
The grain, the wine, and the oil,
the sheep and the oxen.
R. The Lord will guard us as a shepherd guards his flock.
Then the virgins shall make merry and dance,
and young men and old as well.
I will turn their mourning into joy,
I will console and gladden them after their sorrows.
R. The Lord will guard us as a shepherd guards his flock.

AlleluiaSEE LK 8:15

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Blessed are they who have kept the word with a generous heart
and yield a harvest through perseverance.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMT 13:18-23

Jesus said to his disciples:
"Hear the parable of the sower.
The seed sown on the path is the one who hears the word of the Kingdom
without understanding it,
and the Evil One comes and steals away
what was sown in his heart.
The seed sown on rocky ground
is the one who hears the word and receives it at once with joy.
But he has no root and lasts only for a time.
When some tribulation or persecution comes because of the word,
he immediately falls away.
The seed sown among thorns is the one who hears the word,
but then worldly anxiety and the lure of riches choke the word
and it bears no fruit.
But the seed sown on rich soil
is the one who hears the word and understands it,
who indeed bears fruit and yields a hundred or sixty or thirtyfold."

Saint July 27 : St. Pantelon : #Patron of #Bachelors



St. Pantaleon
MARTYR
Feast: July 27


Information:
Feast Day:July 27
Died:305
Patron of:against consumption, against tuberculosis bachelors, doctors, physicians, torture victims

Saint Pantaleon the Healer, Patron Saint of Physicians

Posted by Jacob

Today, July 28, we celebrate the feast day ofSaint Pantaleon the Healer (also known as Saint Panteleimon, died 303), physician, confessor, and martyr for the faith. While serving as physician to the Emperor Maximianus, Saint Pantaleon lived his faith loudly, despite persecution of Christians, and through his witness and charity to the poor and enslaved, earned the martyrs’ crown. He is considered a contemporary to Saints Cosmas and Damian, also Christian physicians who suffered for their faith. Saint Pantaleon, whose name means the “all-compassionate one,” is the patron saint of physicians.Pantaleon was born. in the city of Nicodemia (currently called Izmit, in northern Turkey near the Black Sea). His mother, Eubula, was a devout Christian who raised her son in the Christian way of life, while his father, Eustorgius, did not convert until much later. Sadly, Eubula passed away while Pantaleon was still quite young. While he had been exposed to Christianity, Pantaleon did not fully practice as a young man. Handsome, polite, and humble, he radiated happiness and peace to all he encountered, but was drawn to worldly pursuits. His father sent him to study under a famous physician, and eventually was appointed the royal physician to the court of Emperor Maximian.
While at the royal court, Pantaleon fell further from the faith, deceived by hearing the false maxims of the world applauded. It was then that the Lordsent a model of the faith, a zealous and prudent Christian named Hermolaus, to Pantaleon, to serve as advisor and friend. Hermolaus took special notice of the young physician and awakened his conscience, telling him that although the famous physicians of ancient times had possessed the science which cures bodies, Jesus Christ was a far more excellent Physician, able to cure not only bodies, but souls, by His divine doctrine. Through continued discussion and counsel, Pantaleon came to accept Christ into his heart. 


Soon thereafter, Pantaleon experienced a miraculous healing, saving a child from certain death after being bitten by a viper. Needing no further proof of the power of the Lord, he was baptized into the faith, and undertook a rigorous course of study on the Sacraments of the Church, Holy Communion, and the teachings and practices of the faithful. Through his faith, he subsequently cured a man of blindness, which led him to the faith. Similarly, his father, hearing of his son’s healings, converted, receiving Christ into his heart.



When Eustorgus, his father, died, Saint Pantaleon liberated all his slaves on the family estate, and, having sold most of his possessions, gave to the liberated ones and others the assistance their poverty required. He cured other illnesses and soon became renowned in Nicodemia, attracting the attention of competing physicians. They wished to betray him to the Emperor, who was actively persecuting Christians.
Pantaleon was ordered to appear before the Emperor, who described the charges against him. The emperor had grown to like and trust Pantaleon, and attempted to save him by offering him the chance to make sacrifice to the pagan Roman gods. Of course, Pantaleon refused, and it was ordered that he be tortured and killed. After multiple attempts to kill him—which he miraculously survived—Saint Pantaleon was beheaded. 



The body of Saint Pantaleon was anointed with myrrh and buried outside of the city. His remains, or a portion of them, were later translated to Constantinople, where they are venerated today. It is said that his blood, conserved in a small vial, liquefies on his feast day, becoming oxygenated. Some of his relics, including his head, were later again translated to France by Charlemagne, and reside in the abbey of Saint Denys near Paris and in Lyons.

Prayer of the Sick to Saint Pantaleon

Saint Pantaleon, you know that it is hard to be ill without hope to get well again. Sometimes it is even more difficult to see someone suffer whom we love and whom we cannot help. Pray for the doctors in whom we trust. Give them wisdom and patience for the right way of treatment. 

You emulated God's mercy, and He granted you the power of healing, o Pantaleon, victorious martyr of Christ. Heal our spiritual diseases through your intercession, and as we constantly cry out to the Lord, 'Save us!' take away the temptations which the enemy always places before our steps. Grant, we beseech thee, Almighty God: that by the prayers of thy holy Martyr blessed Pantaleon, we may be delivered from all adversities which may happen to the body, and from all evil thoughts which may assault and hurt the soul.His feast day is 27 July, also 28 July, and 18 February.


Text from 365 Rosaries Blogspot