Sunday, September 9, 2018

Saint September 10 : St. Nicholas of Tolentino : Patron of #Babies, #Animals, and #Dying


Born at Sant' Angelo, near Fermo, in the March of Ancona, about 1246; d. 10 September, 1306. He is depicted in the black habit of the Hermits of St. Augustine — a star above him or on his breast, a lily, or a crucifix garlanded with lilies, in his hand. Sometimes, instead of the lily, he holds a vial filled with money or bread. His parents, said to have been called Compagnonus de Guarutti and Amata de Guidiani (these surnames may merely indicate their birth-places), were pious folk, perhaps gentle born, living content with a small substance. Nicholas was born in response to prayers, his mother a model of holiness. He excelled so much in his studies that even before they were over he was made a canon of St. Saviour's church; but hearing a sermon by a hermit of St. Augustine upon the text: "Nolite diligere mundum, nec ea quae sunt in mundo, quia mundus transit et concupiscentia ejus", he felt a call to embrace the religious life. He besought the hermit for admittance into his order. His parents gave a joyful consent. Even before his ordination he was sent to different monasteries of his order, at Recanati, Macerata etc., as a model of generous striving after perfection. He made his profession before he was nineteen. After his ordination he preached with wonderful success, notably at Tolentino, where he spent his last thirty years and gave a discourse nearly every day. Towards the end diseases tried his patience, but he kept up his mortifications almost to the hour of death. He possessed an angelic meekness, a guileless simplicity, and a tender love of virginity, which he never stained, guarding it by prayer and extraordinary mortifications. He was canonized by Eugene IV in 1446; his feast is celebrated on 10 September. His tomb, at Tolentino, is held in veneration by the faithful.
Text shared from the Catholic Encyclopedia

Happy Rosh Hashanah! 10 Points to SHARE about the Jewish New Year and Links to Catholicism


1. Rosh Hashanah is the birthday of the universe, the day God created Adam and Eve, and it’s celebrated as the head of the Jewish year.
 2. It is celebrated on the first two days of the Jewish new year, Tishrei 1 and 2, beginning at sundown on the eve of Tishrei 1. Rosh Hashanah 2018 begins at sundown on September 9 and continues to September 11 .
 3. It is celebrated by Candle lighting in the evenings, prayer services, festive meals with eating sweet delicacies during the night and day.
4. At the prayer services the ram’s horn (shofar) is sounded on both mornings.
5. As the horn is being blown,  you are to think about your actions in the past year, repent, start afresh etc.
6. It’s also traditional to wear white (as a colour of purity) on Rosh Hashanah. New clothes are also traditional.
7. The following week is regarded as a period of reflection (although normal life resumes), culminating next weekend in the festival of Yom Kippur – a 25-hour fast during which  ‘repenting’ becomes important.
8. Many Jews who converted to Catholicism still celebrate these Jewish festivals.
9. It is traditional to say Shanah Tovah Umetukah (Hebrew: שנה טובה ומתוקה‎), meaning "A Good and Sweet Year".
10. Traditionally, apples, honey and bread (Challah) are eaten - You can find some easy recipes here: https://www.chabad.org/recipes/recipe_cdo/aid/4323/jewish/Rosh-Hashanah-Recipes.htm


Image Source chanukkah2016.com
Watch this Video Explaining Rosh Hashanah and the Jewish Roots of Catholicism:



#BreakingNews Pontifical Commission for Protection of Minors "...our starting point is to prevent abuses."

Cardinal Sean Patrick O'Malley, President of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of MinorsCardinal Sean Patrick O'Malley, President of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors
VATICAN
PROTECTION OF MINORS
SEÁN PATRICK O'MALLEY
The Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors concludes Plenary Assembly
At the conclusion of the 9th ordinary Plenary Assembly of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors, which took place in Rome from September 7 to 9, 2018, the following communiqué was released.
The Holy Father has emphasized the primary importance of listening to victims /survivors and having their life stories guide the response of the Church in protecting minors from sexual abuse. Members began by listening to two testimonies of people who were affected by clerical child sexual abuse, a victim/survivor and the mother of two adult survivors who were abused as children. The Commission thanks them for sharing their stories with us, for the courage of their witness and for contributing to the learning process.
Members also reflected on the recent developments in the global church that have negatively affected so many people including victims/survivors, families and the community of faithful. The questions that have been raised in recent months not only focus the public on the seriousness of abuse, they are an opportunity to call people to the mission of prevention so that the future will be different from our history. The Commission’s starting point is not to investigate abuses; our starting point is to prevent abuses.
Working with Survivors
During the Plenary Assembly the group of experts dedicated to Working with Survivors announced the launch of pilot projects, the first of which is in Brazil. Building on the work of founding members, these projects are a mechanism to create safe spaces and transparent processes by which people who have been abused can come forward. Through these survivor advisory panels it is hoped the local church leadership will also benefit from the direct input of victims/survivors into how they can improve their child protection and safeguarding policies.
Local Responsibility
Since meeting in April, Commission members have taken part in over 100 safeguarding workshops.
The group that oversees Education and Formation outlined a series of future initiatives in formation seminars and conferences that are an essential part of promoting awareness of and responsibility for protection polices at a local level.
In April 2019, the Commission will sponsor a Safeguarding Conference for Church leaders in Central/Eastern Europe. Also in April 2019, together with the Brazilian Bishops Conference the Commission will offer a week of safeguarding formation for bishops and formators, in Aparecida, Brazil. In November 2019 Members have been invited to address a meeting of CELAM in Mexico. In 2020, the Commission will co-sponsor a Congress on Protection of Minors for operators in the church and civil society in the Americas in Bogotá, Colombia.
The working group Safeguarding Guidelines and Norms shared its progress on developing an auditing instrument to offer to local Bishops Conferences to aid in the oversight of their safeguarding policies and procedures.
Working with the Holy See
Collaboration with the entities of the Holy See and Roman Curia is also an integral part of the Commission’s mandate to aid the Holy Father. During the Plenary, some members had the opportunity to address the two courses for bishops newly ordained the in the past year, one organized by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples and another by the Congregation for Bishops.
The Commission presentation was well attended and warmly received and members are grateful to the Prefects of these Congregations, Cardinal Filoni and Cardinal Ouellet and their collaborators for those meetings and the consistent attention to this important aspect of our safeguarding mission. Over the course of the coming week the Commission will also have working meetings with the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and with the Italian Bishops Conference CEI, to further collaborative efforts in the field of child protection.
Marking the 30th Anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child November 20, 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child which is ratified by 196 State Parties including the Holy See. The Commission will proactively work with various stakeholders to seize this opportunity to raise awareness on the protection of children.
The Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors was created by Pope Francis in March of 2014 to propose the most opportune initiatives for the protection of all minors and vulnerable adults and to promote local responsibility in the particular Churches.
 For more information on the work of the Pontifical Commission visit our website at: 
www.protectionofminors.va/content/tuteladeiminori/en.html
FULL TEXT Release from Vatican News

Pope Francis "Jesus has revealed to us the secret of a miracle that we also can repeat..." FULL TEXT + Video

Before the Angelus:
 Dear Brothers and Sisters, good morning!
This Sunday’s Gospel (Cf. Mark 7:31-37) refers to the episode of the miraculous healing of a deaf mute, wrought by Jesus. They brought a deaf mute to Him and besought Him to lay his hand upon him. He, instead, performs on him different gestures: first of all, He takes him aside far from the crowd. On this occasion, as in others, Jesus acts always with discretion. He doesn’t want to impress the people; He isn’t seeking popularity or success, but He just wants to do good to people. He teaches us with this example that good is done without clamor, without ostentation, without “sounding a trumpet.” It’s done in silence.
When He was aside, Jesus put His fingers into the ears of the deaf mute and touched his tongue with saliva. This gesture refers to the Incarnation. The Son of God is a man fully inserted in the human reality: He was made man, therefore He can understand the painful condition of another man and He intervenes with a gesture that involves His humanity. At the same time, Jesus wants it understood that the miracle takes place due to His union with the Father: so He looked up to Heaven. Then He sighed and said the decisive words: “Ephphatha,” which means, “be opened.” And the man was immediately cured: his ears were opened and his tongue was released. His healing was for him an “opening’ to others and to the world.
This account stresses the need of the double healing: first of all, the healing of the sickness and of physical suffering, to restore the health of the body; even if this end isn’t completely attainable in the earthly horizon, despite the many efforts of science and medicine. However, there is a second healing, perhaps more difficult, and it is the healing of fear; the healing of fear that drives us to marginalize the sick, to marginalize the suffering, the disabled. And there are many ways of marginalizing, also with a pseudo-piety or with the removal of the problem; one remains deaf and dumb in face of the pains of people marked by illnesses, anguishes, and difficulties. Too often the sick and the suffering become a problem, whereas they should be occasions to manifest the solicitude and solidarity of a society in its dealings with the weakest.
Jesus has revealed to us the secret of a miracle that we also can repeat, becoming protagonists of the “Ephphath,” of those words “be opened” with which He gave back the word and hearing to the deaf mute. It’s about opening ourselves to the needs of our suffering brothers in need of help, avoiding egoism and closure of the heart. It is, in fact, the heart, namely, a person’s profound nucleus, that Jesus came to “open,” to liberate, to make us capable of living fully our relationship with God and with others. He became man so that man, rendered interiorly deaf and dumb by sin, is able to listen to the voice of God, the voice of Love that speaks to his heart and thus learn to speak, in turn, the language of love, translating it into gestures of generosity and self-giving.
May Mary, She who “opened” herself totally to the love of the Lord, obtain for us the ability to experience every day in faith, the miracle of the “Ephphatha,” to live in communion with God and with brothers.
[Original text: Italian]  [Blog Share of ZENIT’s translation by Virginia M. Forrester]

 After the Angelus:
 Dear Brothers and Sisters,
Celebrated yesterday at Loreto, in the Pontifical Shrine of the Holy House, was the Nativity of Mary and the proposal of spirituality for families was launched: the House of Mary, House of every family. We entrust the Shrine’s initiative and all those that will take part in different capacities to the Holy Virgin.
Held today at Strasbourg is the Beatification of Alfonsa Maria Eppinger, Founder of the Sisters of the most Holy Saviour. We thank God for this courageous and wise woman who, suffering, in silence and praying, witnessed God’s love especially to all those who were sick in body and in spirit — an applause all together for the new Blessed!
I greet you all affectionately, Romans and pilgrims from several countries: the families, the parish groups, the Associations.
I greet the faithful of the diocese of Como, the young people participants in the meeting promoted by the Work of the Church <and> the Confirmation candidates of Prevalle.
I wish you all a happy Sunday. And please, don’t forget to pray for me.
Enjoy your lunch and goodbye!
[Original text: Italian]  [Blog Share of ZENIT’s translation by Virginia M. Forrester]

Sunday Mass Online : Sun. September 9, 2018 - Readings + Video - #Eucharist


Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 128

Reading 1IS 35:4-7A

Thus says the LORD:
Say to those whose hearts are frightened:
Be strong, fear not!
Here is your God,
he comes with vindication;
with divine recompense
he comes to save you.
Then will the eyes of the blind be opened,
the ears of the deaf be cleared;
then will the lame leap like a stag,
then the tongue of the mute will sing.
Streams will burst forth in the desert,
and rivers in the steppe.
The burning sands will become pools,
and the thirsty ground, springs of water.

Responsorial PsalmPS 146:6-7, 8-9, 9-10

R. (1b) Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
The God of Jacob keeps faith forever,
secures justice for the oppressed,
gives food to the hungry.
The LORD sets captives free.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
The LORD gives sight to the blind;
the LORD raises up those who were bowed down.
The LORD loves the just;
the LORD protects strangers.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
The fatherless and the widow the LORD sustains,
but the way of the wicked he thwarts.
The LORD shall reign forever;
your God, O Zion, through all generations.
Alleluia.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.

Reading 2JAS 2:1-5

My brothers and sisters, show no partiality
as you adhere to the faith in our glorious Lord Jesus Christ.
For if a man with gold rings and fine clothes
comes into your assembly,
and a poor person in shabby clothes also comes in,
and you pay attention to the one wearing the fine clothes
and say, “Sit here, please, ”
while you say to the poor one, “Stand there, ” or “Sit at my feet, ”
have you not made distinctions among yourselves
and become judges with evil designs?

Listen, my beloved brothers and sisters.
Did not God choose those who are poor in the world
to be rich in faith and heirs of the kingdom
that he promised to those who love him?

AlleluiaCF. MT 4:23

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Jesus proclaimed the Gospel of the kingdom
and cured every disease among the people.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMK 7:31-37

Again Jesus left the district of Tyre
and went by way of Sidon to the Sea of Galilee,
into the district of the Decapolis.
And people brought to him a deaf man who had a speech impediment
and begged him to lay his hand on him.
He took him off by himself away from the crowd.
He put his finger into the man’s ears
and, spitting, touched his tongue;
then he looked up to heaven and groaned, and said to him,
“Ephphatha!”— that is, “Be opened!” —
And immediately the man’s ears were opened,
his speech impediment was removed,
and he spoke plainly.
He ordered them not to tell anyone.
But the more he ordered them not to,
the more they proclaimed it.
They were exceedingly astonished and they said,
“He has done all things well.
He makes the deaf hear and the mute speak.”

Saint September 9 : St. Peter Claver : Patron of #Racism, #Slaves and #African Americans


The son of a Catalonian farmer, was born at Verdu, in 1581; he died 8 September, 1654. He obtained his first degrees at the University of Barcelona. At the age of twenty he entered the Jesuit novitiate at Tarragona. While he was studying philosophy at Majorca in 1605, Alphonsus Rodriguez, the saintly door-keeper of the college, learned from God the future mission of his young associate, and thenceforth never ceased exhorting him to set out to evangelize the Spanish possessions in America. Peter obeyed, and in 1610 landed at Cartagena, where for forty-four years he was the Apostle of the negro slaves. Early in the seventeenth century the masters of Central and South America afforded the spectacle of one of those social crimes which are entered upon so lightly. They needed labourers to cultivate the soil which they had conquered and to exploit the gold mines. The natives being physically incapable of enduring the labours of the mines, it was determined to replace them with negroes brought from Africa. The coasts of Guinea, the Congo, and Angola became the market for slave dealers, to whom native petty kings sold their subjects and their prisoners. By its position in the Caribbean Sea, Cartagena became the chief slave-mart of the New World. A thousand slaves landed there each month. They were bought for two, and sold for 200 écus. Though half the cargo might die, the trade remained profitable. Neither the repeated censures of the pope, nor those of Catholic moralists could prevail against this cupidity. The missionaries could not suppress slavery, but only alleviate it, and no one worked more heroically than Peter Claver.
Trained in the school of Père Alfonso de Sandoval, a wonderful missionary, Peter declared himself "the slave of the negroes forever", and thenceforth his life was one that confounds egotism by its superhuman charity. Although timid and lacking in self-confidence, he became a daring and ingenious organizer. Every month when the arrival of the negroes was signalled, Claver went out to meet them on the pilot's boat, carrying food and delicacies. The negroes, cooped up in the hold, arrived crazed and brutalized by suffering and fear. Claver went to each, cared for him, and showed him kindness, and made him understand that henceforth he was his defender and father. He thus won their good will. To instruct so many speaking different dialects, Claver assembled at Cartagena a group of interpreters of various nationalities, of whom he made catechists. While the slaves were penned up at Cartagena waiting to be purchased and dispersed, Claver instructed and baptized them in the Faith. On Sundays during Lent he assembled them, inquired concerning their needs, and defended them against their oppressors. This work caused Claver severe trials, and the slave merchants were not his only enemies. The Apostle was accused of indiscreet zeal, and of having profaned the Sacraments by giving them to creatures who scarcely possessed a soul. Fashionable women of Cartagena refused to enter the churches where Father Claver assembled his negroes. The saint's superiors were often influenced by the many criticisms which reached them. Nevertheless, Claver continued his heroic career, accepting all humiliations and adding rigorous penances to his works of charity. Lacking the support of men, the strength of God was given him. He became the prophet and miracle worker of New Granada, the oracle of Cartagena, and all were convinced that often God would not have spared the city save for him. During his life he baptized and instructed in the Faith more than 300,000 negroes. He was beatified 16 July, 1850, by Pius IX, and canonized 15 January, 1888, by Leo XIII. His feast is celebrated on the ninth of September. On 7 July, 1896, he was proclaimed the special patron of all the Catholic missions among the negroes. Alphonsus Rodriguez was canonized on the same day as Peter Claver.