Saturday, November 3, 2018

Wow a #ProLife Pope Francis Prays at Cemetery of Unborn Babies - Watch the Video and Share!

Pope Francis visited Laurentino cemetery in the Roman countryside. The cemetery was consecrated on 9 March 2002 by the then Cardinal Vicar Camillo Ruini.
On January 4, 2012, the "Garden of Angels" was inaugurated: a green area of about 600 square meters dedicated to the burial of unborn babies .
Surrounded by a hedge, the Garden is located in front of the " Children’s cemetery" and is symbolically guarded by two large marble statues depicting two angels, a symbol of innocence and purity. The chapel of the Risen Christ Laurentino is the only cemetery in the Rome with its own chapel .  

#Clocks Go Back 1 Hour in most of North America Nov. 4 at 2am - Remind your Friends - Share!

CLOCKS GO BACK 1 HOUR this SUNDAY NOVEMBER 4, 2018 at 2 am. In most of North America Daylight Savings time ends and the clocks go back 1 hour. This means you can sleep in 1 hour before going to Church. 
Here is a FUNNY Video about the Time Change to Remind you not to Forget Church!
 (Image Source : GOOGLE)

Pope Francis "In the ministry,...The centre of it all can only be a heart in love with the Lord." FULL TEXT Homily + Video

HOLY MASS FOR THE REPOSE OF THE SOULS OF THE CARDINALS AND BISHOPS
WHO DIED OVER THE COURSE OF THE YEAR
HOMILY OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS
Vatican Basilica, Altar of the Chair of Saint Peter
Saturday, 3 November 2018

In the parable of today’s Gospel, we heard that the bridesmaids, all ten of them, “went forth to meet the bridegroom” (Mt 25:1). For all of us, life is a constant call to go forth: from our mother’s womb, from the house where we are born, from infancy to youth, from youth to adulthood, all the way to our going forth from this world. For ministers of the Gospel too, life is in constant movement, as we go forth from our family home to wherever the Church sends us, from one variety of service to another. We are always on the move, until we make our final journey.
The Gospel shows us the meaning of this constant wayfaring that is life: it is a going forth to meet the Bridegroom. This is what life is meant to be lived for: the call that resounds in the night, according to the Gospel, and which we will hear at the hour of our death: “Here is the Bridegroom! Come out to meet him!” (v. 6). The encounter with Jesus, the Bridegroom who “loved the Church and gave himself up for her” (Eph 5:25), gives meaning and direction to our lives. That and nothing more. It is the finale that illuminates everything that preceded it. Just as the seeding is judged by the harvest, so the journey of life is shaped by its ultimate goal.
If our life is a journey to meet the Bridegroom, it is also the time we have been granted to grow in love. Every day of our lives is a preparation for the wedding banquet, a great period of betrothal. Let us ask ourselves: do I live like someone preparing to meet the Bridegroom? In the ministry, amid all our meetings, activities and paperwork, we must never lose sight of the one thread that holds the entire fabric together: our expectation of the Bridegroom. The centre of it all can only be a heart in love with the Lord. Only in this way will the visible body of our ministry be sustained by an invisible soul. Here we begin to realize what the Apostle tells us in the second reading: “We look not at what can be seen but at what cannot be seen; for what can be seen is temporary, but what cannot be seen is eternal” (2 Cor 4:18). Let us not keep our gaze fixed on earthly affairs, but look beyond them. It is true when they say that the really important things are invisible to our eyes. The really important thing in life is hearing the voice of the Bridegroom. That voice asks us daily to catch sight of the Lord who comes, and to make our every activity a means of preparation for his wedding banquet.
We are reminded of this by what the Gospel tells is the one essential thing for the bridesmaids awaiting the wedding banquet. It is not their gowns, or their lamps, but rather the oil kept in small jars.
Here we see a first feature of oil: it is not impressive. It remains hidden; it does not appear, yet without it there is no light. What does this suggest to us? That in the Lord’s eyes what matters is not appearances but the heart (cf. 1 Sam 16:7). Everything that the world runs after and then parades – honours, power, appearances, glory – passes away and leaves nothing behind. Detachment from worldly appearances is essential to our preparation for heaven. We need to say no to the “cosmetic culture” that tells us to worry about how we look. Instead of our outward appearance that passes away, we should purify and keep custody of our heart, our inner self, which is precious in the eyes of God.
Along with this first feature – not to be flashy but essential – there is another aspect of oil: it exists in order to be consumed. Only when it is burned does it spread light. Our lives are like that: they radiate light only if they are consumed, if they spend themselves in service. The secret to live is to live to serve. Service is the ticket to be presented at the door of the eternal wedding banquet. Whatever will remain of life, at the doorstep of eternity, is not what we gained but what we gave away (cf. Mt 6:19-21; 1 Cor 13:8). The meaning of life is found in our response to God’s offer of love. And that response is made up of true love, self-giving and service. Serving others involved a cost, since it involves spending ourselves, letting ourselves be consumed. In our ministry, those who do not live to serve do not de-serve to live. Those who hold on too tightly to their lives will lose them.
A third feature of oil is clearly present in the Gospel: it must be prepared. Oil has to be stored up ahead of time and carried with one (cf. vv. 4, 7). Love is certainly spontaneous, but it is not impromptu. It was precisely by their lack of preparation that the bridesmaids excluded from the wedding banquet showed their foolishness. Now is the time for preparation: here and now, day by day, love has to be stored up and fostered. Let us ask for grace to renew daily our first love with the Lord (cf. Rev 2:4), lest its flame die out. It is a great temptation to sink into a life without love, which ends up being like an empty vase, a snuffed lamp. If we do not invest in love, life will stifle it. Those called to God’s wedding feast cannot be content with a sedentary, flat and humdrum life that plods on without enthusiasm, seeking petty satisfactions and pursuing fleeting rewards. A dreary and predictable life, content to carry out its duties without giving of itself, is unworthy of the Bridegroom.
As we pray for the Cardinals and Bishops who have passed away in this last year, let us beg the intercession of all those who lived unassuming lives, content to prepare daily to meet the Lord. Following the example of these witnesses, who praise God are all around us in great numbers, let us not be content with a quick glance at this day and nothing else. Instead, let us desire to look farther ahead, to the wedding banquet that awaits us. A life burning with desire for God and trained by love will be prepared to enter the chamber of the Bridegroom, and this, forever.


#BreakingNews ISIS Kills 7 Coptic Christians on Pilgrimage in Egypt - Please Pray

The Monastery of Saint Samuel the Confessor in Egypt’s western desert. In May 2017, gunmen wearing military fatigues opened fire on three buses that were traveling near the  monastery.— Islamic State gunmen killed at least seven Coptic Christian pilgrims in Egypt on Friday and wounded at least 16 in an attack. President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, has vowed to protect Christians, a minority in the country, from attack. The shooting occurred as two buses carrying pilgrims left the Monastery of Saint Samuel the Confessor, 85 miles south of Cairo, in Egypt’s Western Desert.
The gunmen opened fire. One of the buses managed to speed away, but the other, in which the seven people were killed, did not. People were injured on both buses.
 Visits to desert monasteries, are popular in the religious practice of many Egyptian Copts, who make up an estimated 10 percent of the country’s population. 

Today's Mass Readings and Video : #1stSaturday November 3, 2018 - #Eucharist


Saturday of the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 484

Reading 1 PHIL 1:18B-26

Brothers and sisters:
As long as in every way, whether in pretense or in truth,
Christ is being proclaimed, and in that I rejoice.

Indeed I shall continue to rejoice,
for I know that this will result in deliverance for me
through your prayers and support from the Spirit of Jesus Christ.
My eager expectation and hope
is that I shall not be put to shame in any way,
but that with all boldness, now as always,
Christ will be magnified in my body,
whether by life or by death.
For to me life is Christ, and death is gain.
If I go on living in the flesh, that means fruitful labor for me.
And I do not know which I shall choose.
I am caught between the two.
I long to depart this life and be with Christ,
for that is far better.
Yet that I remain in the flesh is more necessary for your benefit.
And this I know with confidence,
that I shall remain and continue in the service of all of you
for your progress and joy in the faith,
so that your boasting in Christ Jesus may abound on account of me
when I come to you again.

Responsorial PsalmPS 42:2, 3, 5CDEF

R. My soul is thirsting for the living God.
As the hind longs for the running waters,
so my soul longs for you, O God.
R. My soul is thirsting for the living God.
Athirst is my soul for God, the living God.
When shall I go and behold the face of God?
R. My soul is thirsting for the living God.
I went with the throng
and led them in procession to the house of God.
Amid loud cries of joy and thanksgiving,
with the multitude keeping festival.
R. My soul is thirsting for the living God.

AlleluiaMT 11:29AB

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Take my yoke upon you and learn from me,
for I am meek and humble of heart.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelLK 14:1, 7-11

On a sabbath Jesus went to dine
at the home of one of the leading Pharisees,
and the people there were observing him carefully.

He told a parable to those who had been invited,
noticing how they were choosing the places of honor at the table.
"When you are invited by someone to a wedding banquet,
do not recline at table in the place of honor.
A more distinguished guest than you may have been invited by him,
and the host who invited both of you may approach you and say,
'Give your place to this man,'
and then you would proceed with embarrassment
to take the lowest place.
Rather, when you are invited,
go and take the lowest place
so that when the host comes to you he may say,
'My friend, move up to a higher position.'
Then you will enjoy the esteem of your companions at the table.
For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled,
but the one who humbles himself will be exalted."

Saint November 3 : Saint Martin de Porres : Patron of Black people


St. Martin de Porres DOMINICAN MYSTIC
Feast: November 3
Information:
Feast Day:
November 3
Born:
December 9, 1579, Lima, Peru
Died:
November 3, 1639, Lima, Peru
Canonized:
May 6, 1962 by Pope John XXIII
Major Shrine:
Church and Convent of Santo Domingo, Lima, Peru
Patron of:
black people, hair stylists, innkeepers, mixed-race people, Peru, poor people, public education, public health, public schools, race relations, social justice, state schools, television, Peruvian Naval Aviators

Pope John 23rd chose to remember St. Martin de Porres when he canonized him in 1962. The humble servant of God whose feast day we celebrate on November 3rd, was born in Peru in 1579. He was the son of a nobleman and a young freed slave, and grew up in poverty. Aged 11 he became a sevant in the Dominican priory in Lima, and promoted to almoner, he begged money from the rich to support the poor and sick. Placed in charge of the Dominican's infirmary; known for his tender care of the sick and for his spectacularcures, his superiors dropped the stipulation that "no black person may be received to the holy habit or profession of the and Martin took vows as a brother. He established an and 's for the of the slums. He set up a for the stray and . Martin lived in self-imposed austerity and spent much time in prayer and meditation. He knew St. Rose of Lima. (Vatican.va)