Thursday, November 15, 2018

Saint November 16 : St. Gertrude the Great : #Benedictine : Patron of #Nuns, #Travellers, West Indies


St. Gertrude the Great
BENEDICTINE AND MYSTIC WRITER
Feast: November 16
Information:
Feast Day:
November 16
Born:
6 January 1256 at Eisleben, Germany
Died:
November 17, 1302, Helfta, Germany
Canonized:
received equipotent canonization, and a universal feast day declared in 1677 by Pope Clement XII
Patron of:
nuns, travellers, West Indies

Memorial: November 16 - in Germany: November 17 Also known as: Getrude; Gertrud the Great of Helfta, Gertrude the Great Saint Gertrude is one of the greatest and most wonderful saints in the Church of God. Gertrude was born January 6, 1256, in Eisleben, Thuringia ((part of modern Germany). When she was about 5 years old, she became a student at the Benedictine monastery at Helfta, near Eisleben (southwest of Magdeburg, Germany). The Abbess at the time was Gertrude of Hackerborn a woman who ensured that both spiritual and intellectual life flourished. The child Gertrude was put in the care of Mechthilde (became later a Saint), the sister of the Abbess who was head of the school associated with the monastery. Gertrude studied the Scriptures, the Liturgy, and the writings of the Fathers of the Church.
Her life was crowded with wonders. She has in obedience recorded some of her visions, in which she traces in words of indescribable beauty the intimate converse of her soul with Jesus and Mary. Gertrude had her first vision of Christ at the age of twenty-six. She tells us that she heard Christ say to her, "Do not fear. I will save you and set you free." This was the first in a series of visions that transformed her life. From then on, she spent many hours reading the bible and writing essays on the word of God. When she was asked to write about her experiences, she claimed that it would serve no purpose. When she was told that her words would encourage others, Gertrude agreed to write spiritual autobiography. Gertrude committed to writing many of her mystical experiences in the book commonly called the "Revelations of Saint Gertrude." These Revelations form one of the classics of Catholic writing. And although they would have to be classified as “mystical literature,” their message is clear and obvious, for this book states many of the secrets of Heaven in terms that all can understand. Recorded here are Saint Gertrude's many conversations with Our Lord, wherein He reveals His great desire to grant mercy to souls and to reward the least good act. In the course of their conversations, He reveals wonderful spiritual “shortcuts” that will help everyone in his or her spiritual life. She also composed many prayers, ‘sweeter than the honeycomb’, and many other examples of spiritual liturgically inspired Exercitia spiritualia is a gem still awaiting in-depth analysis.
But Gertrud’s most important legacy is universally acknowledged to be the Legatus memorialis abundantiae divinae pietatis, or Herald of the Memorial of the Abundance of Divine Love. This complex work, usually abbreviated in English to The Herald of Divine Love, is worthy of attention both in itself and as a fascinating test case for the study of medieval women’s theology. Another most important book is “The spiritual exercises”. Through her writings helped spread devotion to the Sacred Heart. She meditated on the Passion of Christ which many times brought a flood of tears to her eyes. She had a tender love for Our Lady.
During the long illness of five months from which she would die, she gave not the slightest sign of impatience or sadness; her joy, on the contrary, increased with her pains. When the day of her death arrived, November 17, 1302, she saw the Most Blessed Virgin descend from heaven to assist her, and one of her Sisters perceived her soul going straight to the Heart of Jesus, which opened to receive it. Saint Gertrude died at Helfta monastery of natural causes.
She is properly known as Saint Gertrude for, although never formally canonized, she was equipollently canonized in 1677 by Pope Clement XII when he inserted her name in the Roman Martyrology. Her feast was set for November 16. Pope Benedict XIV gave her the title "the Great" to distinguish her from Abbess Gertrude of Hackeborn and to recognize the depth of her spiritual and theological insight.
When the community was transferred in 1346 to the monastery of New Helfta, the present Trud-Kloster, within the walls of Eisleben, they still retained possession of their old home, where doubtless the bodies of Saint Gertrude and Saint Mechtilde still buried, though their place of sepulture remains unknown.
Saint Gertrud and Saint Mechtilde:
When Gertrude was five years old, she was placed in the care of Mechtilde. She became the first teacher of Gertrude. They became close friends, and Mechtildis (Mechtilde), who had mystical experiences of her own, helped Gertrude with her Book of Special Graces (also called The Revelations of St. Mechtildis), and the two Saints collaborated on a series of prayers. Mechtidle died November 19, 1298 at Helfta monastery of natural causes. Text shared from MaryPages

Pope Francis "The mission is passion for Jesus, but at the same time, it is passion for his people." FULL TEXT + Video


ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS FATHER FRANCIS
AL PONTIFICIO COLEGIO PÍO LATINOAMERICANO

Clementine Room
Thursday, November 15, 2018


I am happy to meet you and join in the thanksgiving for the 160 years of life of the Pontifical Pío Latinoamericano College. Thanks to the rector, Fr. Gilberto Freire, S.J., for his words on behalf of the entire priestly community and the lay collaborators that make possible, with their daily work, the home life.

Perhaps the most notable characteristic of your College is its Latin American being. It is one of the few Roman Colleges that his identity does not refer to a Nation or a charism, but seeks to be the meeting place, in Rome, of our Latin American land - the Great Homeland as our heroes liked to dream. And so the College was dreamed of and so it is loved by its bishops who give priority to this house, offering you, young priests, the opportunity to create a vision, a reflection and an experience of communion expressly "Latin Americanized".

One of the phenomena that currently hits the continent is the cultural fragmentation, the polarization of the social fabric and the loss of roots. This is exacerbated when discourses are fomented that divide and propagate different types of confrontations and hatred towards those who "are not of ours", even importing cultural models that have little or nothing to do with our history and identity and that, far from mestizing in new syntheses as in the past, end up uprooting our cultures from their richest and most autochthonous traditions. New generations uprooted and fragmented! The Church is not alien to the situation and is exposed to this temptation; subject to the same environment runs the risk of becoming disoriented by falling prey to one or another polarization or uprooted if you forget your vocation to be a meeting ground [1]. The invasion of ideological colonization is also suffered in the Church.

Hence the importance of this time in Rome and especially in the College: to create bonds and alliances of friendship and fraternity. And this not because of a declaration of principles or gestures of goodwill, but because during these years they can learn to know better and make their own the joys and hopes, the sorrows and anguish of their brothers; they can name and face specific situations that our people live and face and feel their neighbor's problems as their own.

The "Pius" can help a lot to create an open and creative, happy and hopeful priestly community, if he knows how to help and help himself, if he is able to take root in the lives of others, brothers and sisters of a common history and heritage, part of a same presbytery and Latin American people. A priestly community that discovers that the greatest strength it has to build history is born of the concrete solidarity among you today, and will continue tomorrow between your churches and peoples to be able to transcend the merely "parochial" and lead communities that know how to open up to others to weave and heal hope (see Exhort, Evangelii Gaudium, 228).

Our continent, marked by old and new wounds, needs artisans of relationship and communion, open and trusting in the novelty that the Kingdom of God can arouse today. And that you can start to develop it from now on. A priest in his parish, in his diocese, can do a lot - and that's fine - but he also runs the risk of burning himself, isolating himself or harvesting for himself. Feeling part of a priestly community, in which everyone is important - not because it is the sum of people living together, but because of the relationships they create, this feeling of belonging to this community - awakens and encourages processes and dynamics capable of transcending the time [2].

This sense of belonging and recognition will help to creatively unleash and stimulate renewed missionary energies that promote an evangelical humanism capable of becoming intelligence and a driving force in our continent. Without this sense of belonging and work hand in hand, on the contrary, we will disperse, we will weaken and what would be worse, we will deprive so many of our brothers of the strength, the light and the consolation of friendship with Jesus Christ and of a community of faith that gives a horizon of meaning and life (see Exhort, Evangelii Gaudium, 49). And so, little by little, and almost without realizing it, we will end up offering Latin America a "God without Church, a Church without Christ, a Christ without a people" (Homily at the Mass of Santa Marta, 11 November 2016) or, if we want to put it another way, a God without Christ, a Christ without a Church, a Church without a people ... pure re-elaborated Gnosticism.
Our continent, marked by old and new wounds, needs artisans of relationship and communion, open and trusting in the novelty that the Kingdom of God can arouse today. And that you can start to develop it from now on. A priest in his parish, in his diocese, can do a lot - and that's fine - but he also runs the risk of burning himself, isolating himself or harvesting for himself. Feeling part of a priestly community, in which everyone is important - not because it is the sum of people living together, but because of the relationships they create, this feeling of belonging to this community - awakens and encourages processes and dynamics capable of transcending the time [2].

This sense of belonging and recognition will help to creatively unleash and stimulate renewed missionary energies that promote an evangelical humanism capable of becoming intelligence and a driving force in our continent. Without this sense of belonging and work hand in hand, on the contrary, we will disperse, we will weaken and what would be worse, we will deprive so many of our brothers of the strength, the light and the consolation of friendship with Jesus Christ and of a community of faith that gives a horizon of meaning and life (see Exhort, Evangelii Gaudium, 49). And so, little by little, and almost without realizing it, we will end up offering Latin America a "God without Church, a Church without Christ, a Christ without a people" (Homily at the Mass of Santa Marta, 11 November 2016) or, if we want to put it another way, a God without Christ, a Christ without a Church, a Church without a people ... pure re-elaborated Gnosticism.

Our continent has managed to capture in its tradition and in its memory a reality: the love of Christ and of Christ can not manifest itself except in passion for life and for the destiny of our peoples and especially solidarity with the poorest, suffering and needy [3].

This reminds us of the importance, dear brothers, that in order to be evangelizers with soul and soul, so that our life may be fruitful and renewed with the passing of time, it is necessary to develop the pleasure of always being close to the life of our people; never isolate ourselves from them. The life of the diocesan presbyter lives -she lacks the redundancy- of this identification and belonging. The mission is passion for Jesus, but at the same time, it is passion for his people. It is learning to look where he looks and to let ourselves be moved by the same thing that he is moved: feelings for the life of his brothers, especially of sinners and of all those who are despondent and fatigued like sheep without a shepherd (cf Mt 9, 36). Please, never curl up in personal or community sheds that take us away from the knots where the story is written. Captivated by Jesus and members of his Body, we integrate deeply into society, share life with everyone, listen to their concerns ... rejoice with those who are happy, mourn with those who mourn and offer every Eucharist for all those faces that were entrusted to us ( see Exhort, Evangelii Gaudium, 269-270).

Hence, find providential power to join this anniversary with the canonization of St. Oscar Romero, former student of your institution and living sign of the fecundity and sanctity of the Latin American Church. A man rooted in the Word of God and in the hearts of his people. This reality allows us to make contact with that long chain of witnesses in which we are invited to root and inspire each day, especially in this time that you are "away from home". Do not be afraid of holiness, do not be afraid to spend your life for your people.

On the path of cultural and pastoral miscegenation we are not orphans; Our Mother accompanies us. She wanted to be like that, mestizo and fertile, and that is how she is with us, Mother of tenderness and strength that rescues us from the paralysis or confusion of fear because she is simply there, she is Mother.

Brothers priests: Let us not forget it and, confidently, ask it to teach us the way, to free us from the perversion of clericalism, to make us more and more "village pastors" and not allow us to become "clerics of the State".

A final word for the Society of Jesus - the presence of its General and the Jesuits who are here - that from the beginning accompanies the walk of this house. Thanks for your work and task.
One of the distinguishing marks of the Company's charism is that of seeking to harmonize contradictions without falling into reductionism. This is what Saint Ignatius wanted to think of the Jesuits as men of contemplation and action, men of discernment and obedience, committed to daily life and free to depart [4]. The mission that the Church puts in your hands asks for wisdom and dedication so that the time that the boys are in the house can be nourished by this gift of the Company, learning to harmonize the contradictions that life presents to them and present them without falling into reductionism, winning in the spirit of discernment and freedom. Teach to embrace problems and conflicts without fear; to handle dissent and confrontation. Teaching to reveal all kinds of "correct" but reductionist discourse is a crucial task for those who accompany their brothers in formation. Help them to discover the art and taste of discernment as a way of proceeding to find, in the midst of difficulties, the ways of the Spirit by tasting and feeling the Deus semper maior internally. Be teachers of great horizons and, at the same time, teach to take charge of the small, to embrace the poor, the sick and to assume the concrete of everyday life. Maximum coefficient, continue at least divinum est.

Thank you again for allowing me to celebrate with you the first 160 years of my journey. In greeting them, I also want to greet your communities, your villages, your families. And, please, do not forget to pray and have prayers for me.

[1] Cf. S. Óscar Romero, IV Pastoral Letter - Mission of the Church in the midst of the country's crisis (August 6, 1979), 23.

[2] It is well to remember that "it is better to be two than one. [...] If one falls, the other raises him up, but poor of the one who falls alone, without another being able to lift him up! "(Qo 4,9-10).

[3] Cf. Guzmán Carriquiry, recalling the 50 years of CELAM, on the way to the V Conference, 31.

[4] Cf. J.M. Bergoglio, Meditations for religious, 93-94.

#BreakingNews US Bishops' Assembly Ends "I am confident that in unity with the Holy Father and in conversation with the Universal Church in February we will move forward." FULL Text + Video


President of U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops Makes Statement at Close of Public Sessions; Fall General Assembly, Baltimore Nov. 12-14
November 14, 2018
BALTIMORE—On the final day of the public sessions of the U.S. Bishops fall general assembly in Baltimore, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston and President of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, delivered the following remarks.
Cardinal DiNardo’s full address follows:
“Brothers, I opened the meeting expressing some disappointment. I end it with hope.
My hope is first of all grounded in Christ, who desires that the Church be purified and that our efforts bear fruit.
In late summer on your behalf, I expressed our renewed fraternal affection for our Holy Father. In September the Administrative Committee expressed for all of us our “love, obedience and loyalty” for Pope Francis. Now together with you today, gathered in Baltimore in Plenary Assembly, we the members of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops pledge to His Holiness our loyalty and devotion in these difficult days. I am sure that, under the leadership of Pope Francis, the conversation that the global Church will have in February will help us eradicate the evil of sexual abuse from our Church. It will make our local efforts more global and the global perspective will help us here.
Brothers, you and the speakers we have heard from have given me direction and consensus. I will take it as a springboard for action. Listening is essential, but listening must inform decisive action. Let me take this moment to thank the many survivors and experts who have given us such good counsel and direction these last few days.
When the summer’s news first broke, we committed to three goals: to do what we could to get to the bottom of the Archbishop McCarrick situation; to make reporting of abuse and misconduct by bishops easier; and, to develop a means of holding ourselves accountable that was genuinely independent, duly authorized, and had substantial lay involvement.
Now, we are on course to accomplish these goals. That is the direction that you and the survivors of abuse across our country have given me for the February meeting in Rome. More than that, in the days prior to the meeting of episcopal conference presidents, the Task Force I established this week will convert that direction into specific action steps. Some of those actions steps include:
  • A process for investigating complaints against bishops reported through a third-party compliance hotline. We will complete a proposal for a single national lay commission and a proposal for a national network relying upon the established diocesan review boards, with their lay expertise, to be overseen by the metropolitan or senior suffragan.
  • Finalizing the Standards of Accountability for Bishops.
  • Finalizing the Protocol for Removed Bishops.
  • Studying national guidelines for the publication of lists of names of those clerics facing substantiated claims of abuse.
  • Supporting the fair and timely completion of the various investigations into the situation surrounding Archbishop McCarrick and publication of their results. We are grateful for the Holy See’s Statement of October 6 in this regard.
We leave this place committed to taking the strongest possible actions at the earliest possible moment. We will do so in communion with the Universal Church. Moving forward in concert with the Church around the world will make the Church in the United States stronger, and will make the global Church stronger.  
But our hope for true and deep reform ultimately lies in more than excellent systems, as essential as these are. It requires holiness: the deeply held conviction of the truths of the Gospel, and the eager readiness to be transformed by those truths in all aspects of life.
As the nuncio reminded us on Monday, “if the Church is to reform herself and her structures, then the reform must spring from her mission of making known Christ, the Son of the Living God.” No system of governance or oversight, however excellent and necessary, suffices alone to make us, weak as we all are, able to live up to the high calling we have received in Christ.
We must recommit to holiness and to the mission of the Church.
Brothers, I have heard you today. I am confident that in unity with the Holy Father and in conversation with the Universal Church in February we will move forward.  
There is more to be done, but what we have done is a sign of hope.
Commending everything to the intercession of Our Lady, we pray together . . .
Hail Mary…"
FULL TEXT Release from the USCCB

#BreakingNews Judge Orders Former Nuncio Viganò to Repay his Brother $2 Million of Inheritance - #CarloVigano

Carlo Maria Viganò, is the former apostolic nuncio to the United States, who wrote several letters which led to a campaign against Pope Francis. Viganò has lost the civil case with his brother for the management of their family inheritance. A ruling by the fourth section of the Civil Court of Milan last October (judge Susanna Terni, number 10.359 / 2018) condemned him to compensate Don Lorenzo Viganò for a million and 800 thousand Euro, together with legal interests and court costs.

Archbishop Carlo Maria and his brother Don Lorenzo, a scholar of Mesopotamian civilization, held their substantial family assets together, which in 2010 included buildings worth around 20 million Euros plus a considerable liquid sum of over six million euros. EUR. The legacy had always been managed by the Archbishop.


According to the ruling, the former nuncio continued to receive the proceeds from real estate and the availability of cash, obtaining a total of "transactions for a net amount of € 3,649,866.25". Half of this amount will now have to be paid to brother Don Lorenzo. The priest had been quoted by the archbishop on the eve of Vatileaks, when Carlo Maria had tried not to leave the Vatican by writing to Benedict XVI not to be able to take up the post of apostolic nuncio in the US because of the illness of the brother he was supposed to take care of .


(It is true that Don Lorenzo Viganò, a resident of Chicago, had been struck by a stroke that forced him into a wheelchair.)

Viganò, supported by several US bishops, with a leading role in recent weeks, arriving two days ago to sign a message to all the participants at the meeting of the US Bishops' Conference, asked them to resist the Pope.
(Edited from the Report by Lastampa - Vatican Insider - Andrea Tornielli)

Pope Francis the Church is made manifest “in the Eucharist and in good works.” #Homily at #CasaSantaMarta

Pope at Mass: Martyrdom doesn’t make the news
At Mass at the Casa Santa Marta, the Pope comments on the day’s Gospel, saying that the Church is made manifest “in the Eucharist and in good works.”
By Barbara Castelli
The Church grows “in simplicity, in silence, in praise, in the Eucharistic sacrifice, in fraternal community, where all are loved,” and none are rejected. That was the message of Pope Francis during the daily Mass celebrated in the chapel at Casa Santa Marta. Commenting on the day’s Gospel (Lk 17:20-25), the Pope said that the Kingdom of God “is not spectacular,” and that it grows in silence.
Good works don’t make the news
The Church, he said, is manifested “in the Eucharist and in good works,” even if they don’t “make the news.” The Bride of Christ has a temperament given to silence; she produces fruit “without making a fuss,” without “sounding the trumpet, like the Pharisees”:
The Lord explains to us how the Church grows with the parable of the sower. The sower sows and the seed grows by day, by night… - God gives the growth – and then the fruit is seen. But this is important: First, the Church grows in silence, in secret; it is the ecclesiastical style. And how is this manifested in the Church? By the fruits of good works, so that the people see and glorify the Father who is in heaven, Jesus says. And in the celebration, the praise and the sacrifice of the Lord – that is, in the Eucharist. There the Church is manifested: in the Eucharist and in good works.
The temptation of seduction
“The Church grows through witness, through prayer, through the attraction of the Spirit who is within,” Pope Francis said in his homily, “and not through events.” These events certainly help, he continued, but “the growth proper to the Church, that which bears fruit, is in silence, in hiding, with good works, and the celebration of the Lord’s Paschal Mystery, the praise of God.”
The Lord helps us to not fall into the temptation of seduction. “We want the Church to be seen more; what can we do so that it will be seen?” So usually one falls into a Church of events that is not capable of growing in silence with good works, in secret. The spirit of the world does not tolerate martyrdom
In a world that too often gives into the temptation to sensation, to worldliness, to appearance, Pope Francis recalled that Jesus Himself was tempted to create a sensation: “But why take so long to accomplish the work of redemption? Perform a good miracle. Cast yourself down from the temple, and everyone will see; they will see, and they will believe in you.” But He chose “the path of preaching, of prayer, of good works,” the way “of the Cross” and “of suffering”:
The Cross and suffering. The Church grows also with the blood of the martyrs, men and women who give their lives. Today there are many [martyrs]. It’s strange; they don’t make the news. The world hides this fact. The spirit of the world does not tolerate martyrdom; it hides it.
FULL TEXT Release by Vatican News va

Wow St. Padre Pio's Prophetic Warning to Critic of the Pope's Authority Archb. Lefebvre

St. Padre Pio met Archbishop Lefebvre and looked at him saying, very sternly:
"Never cause discord among your brothers and always practise the rule of obedience; above all when it seems to you that the errors of those in authority are all the more serious. There is no other road than that of obedience, especially for those of us who have made this vow."
It seems Archbishop Lefebvre did not see things in quite the same way even if he did respond to Padre Pio with: "I will remember that, Father." Padre Pio looked at him intensely and, seeing what would soon happen, said: 
"No! You will forget it! You will tear apart the community of faithful, oppose the will of your superiors and even go against the orders of the pope himself and this will happen quite soon..."
 Source: Pascal Cataneo's book "Padre Pio Gleanings" on page 58.
(Share this Quote of St. Padre Pio which also is a warning for today!)

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Thursday November 15, 2018 - #Eucharist


Thursday of the Thirty-second Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 494

Reading 1PHMN 7-20

Beloved:
I have experienced much joy and encouragement from your love,
because the hearts of the holy ones
have been refreshed by you, brother.
Therefore, although I have the full right in Christ
to order you to do what is proper,
I rather urge you out of love,
being as I am, Paul, an old man,
and now also a prisoner for Christ Jesus.
I urge you on behalf of my child Onesimus,
whose father I have become in my imprisonment,
who was once useless to you but is now useful to both you and me.
I am sending him, that is, my own heart, back to you.
I should have liked to retain him for myself,
so that he might serve me on your behalf
in my imprisonment for the Gospel,
but I did not want to do anything without your consent,
so that the good you do might not be forced but voluntary.
Perhaps this is why he was away from you for a while,
that you might have him back forever,
no longer as a slave but more than a slave, a brother,
beloved especially to me, but even more so to you,
as a man and in the Lord.
So if you regard me as a partner, welcome him as you would me.
And if he has done you any injustice
or owes you anything, charge it to me.
I, Paul, write this in my own hand: I will pay.
May I not tell you that you owe me your very self.
Yes, brother, may I profit from you in the Lord.
Refresh my heart in Christ.

Responsorial PsalmPS 146:7, 8-9A, 9BC-10

R. (5a) Blessed is he whose help is the God of Jacob.
or:
R. Alleluia.
The LORD secures justice for the oppressed,
gives food to the hungry.
The LORD sets captives free.
R. Blessed is he whose help is the God of Jacob.
or:
R. Alleluia.
The LORD gives sight to the blind.
The LORD raises up those who were bowed down;
the LORD loves the just.
The LORD protects strangers.
R. Blessed is he whose help is the God of Jacob.
or:
R. Alleluia.
The fatherless and the widow he sustains,
but the way of the wicked he thwarts.
The LORD shall reign forever;
your God, O Zion, through all generations. Alleluia.
R. Blessed is he whose help is the God of Jacob.
or:
R. Alleluia.

AlleluiaJN 15:5

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
I am the vine, you are the branches, says the Lord:
whoever remains in me and I in him will bear much fruit.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelLK 17:20-25

Asked by the Pharisees when the Kingdom of God would come,
Jesus said in reply,
"The coming of the Kingdom of God cannot be observed,
and no one will announce, 'Look, here it is,' or, 'There it is.'
For behold, the Kingdom of God is among you."

Then he said to his disciples,
"The days will come when you will long to see
one of the days of the Son of Man, but you will not see it.
There will be those who will say to you,
'Look, there he is,' or 'Look, here he is.'
Do not go off, do not run in pursuit.
For just as lightning flashes
and lights up the sky from one side to the other,
so will the Son of Man be in his day.
But first he must suffer greatly and be rejected by this generation."

Death of Beloved Archbishop of Mombasa at Age 90 - RIP Archb. John Njenga of #Kenya

Nairobi — Archbishop Emeritus of Mombasa, the Most Rev John Njenga, has passed on at the age of 90.
Archbishop Njenga passed away on Sunday, November, 4, at Mater Hospital after a short illness.
The news of his death was confirmed by the Archbishop of Mombasa, Most Rev. Martin Kivuva when he met family members and friends of the archbishop at the hospital where he had been admitted.
Archbishop Kivuva led those gathered at the hospital in prayers for the repose of the soul of the late Archbishop.
Archbishop Kivuva described the departed archbishop as a man who was dedicated to serving both the Church and country.
"He served as the chairman of the Bishop's Conference and rendered his services with a lot of dedication and commitment," said Archbishop Kivuva. "He will be remembered for his passion and immerse contribution to the development of education in Kenya.
Archbishop Kivuva thanked the Christian faithful and people of good will who have stood with Archbishop Njenga during his long apostalate to the Church in Kenya.
The General Secretary of the Bishops' Conference, Very Rev. Fr. Daniel Kimutai Rono, paid tribute to the departed for his long service to the Church.
He thanked the Bishops, family and friends for their prayers and support to Archbishop Njenga in his retirement and during the period when he was unwell.
Speaker after speaker praised the Archbishop for his generosity and love for the people of God. All who spoke recalled his selfless support to the needy and his involvement in charity work.
Archbishop Kivuva said plans for the funeral of Archbishop Njenga will be communicated at a later date.
Archbishop Emeritus John Njenga was born on December 25, 1928 to the late Mzee Peter Kimani and Maria Wanjiru in Tigoni, Kiambu District.
He attended Mang'u High School and was ordained priest at Kibosho Major Seminary in Tanzania in 1957. Upon ordination, he was posted to the then Nairobi Diocese.
FULL TEXT Release from All Africa - Capital FM

#BreakingNews US Bishops against Racism - Historic Letter and Resources from #USCCB on #Racism

U.S. Bishops Approved “Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love, A Pastoral Letter Against Racism"
November 14, 2018
BALTIMORE— The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) approved today, during its November General Assembly, the formal statement, “Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love, A Pastoral Letter Against Racism." The full body of bishops approved it by a two-thirds majority vote of 241 to 3 with 1 abstention.
The USCCB Cultural Diversity in the Church Committee, chaired by Archbishop Gustavo Garcia-Siller, MSpS, of San Antonio, Texas, spearheaded the letter’s drafting and guided it through the voting process. Bishop Shelton J. Fabre, of Houma-Thibodaux, Chairman of U.S. Bishops’ Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism and Chair of the Sub-committee on African American Affairs within the Cultural Diversity Committee, issued the following statement:
“The entire body of bishops felt the need to address the topic of racism, once again, after witnessing the deterioration of the public discourse, and episodes of violence and animosity with racial and xenophobic overtones, that have re-emerged in American society in the last few years. Pastoral letters from the full body of bishops are rare, few and far between. But at key moments in history the bishops have come together for important pronouncements, paying attention to a particular issue and with the intention of offering a Christian response, full of hope, to the problems of our time. This is such a time.”
Initiated by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops in August 2017, the Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism was created to address the evil of racism in our society and Church, to address the urgent need to come together as a society to find solutions, and to support the implementation of the bishops’ pastoral letter on racism.
“Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love,” is a Pastoral Letter from the full body of bishops to the lay faithful and all people of goodwill addressing the evil of racism.
The pastoral letter asks us to recall that we are all brothers and sisters, all equally made in the image of God. Because we all bear the image of God, racism is above all a moral and theological problem that manifests institutionally and systematically. Only a deep individual conversion of heart, which then multiplies, will compel change and reform in our institutions and society. It is imperative to confront racism’s root causes and the injustice it produces. The love of God binds us together. This same love should overflow into our relationships with all people. The conversions needed to overcome racism require a deep encounter with the living God in the person of Christ who can heal all division.
"Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love," is not the first time the U.S. Bishops have spoken as a collectively on race issues in the United States, but it is the first time in almost 40 years.
In 1979, they approved "Brothers and Sisters to Us: A Pastoral Letter on Racism in Our Day." Among the many things, they discussed was the fact that "Racism is a sin: a sin that divides the human family, blots out the image of God among specific members of that family, and violates the fundamental human dignity of those called to be children of the same Father." The newly approved “Open Wide Our Hearts” continues the message that “Brothers and Sisters to Us” sought to convey.
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The full text, and resources Below - includes a bulletin insert, homily help, prayer materials, background information on systemic racism, and activities for primary, secondary, and higher education classroom settings.
RELEASE from USCCB
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Check out the educational resources and parish resources that were created to accompany the pastoral letter against racism.

RESOURCES

Brothers and Sisters to Us - U.S. Catholic Bishops Pastoral Letter on Racism, 1979 | Selected quotes
Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself: U.S. Catholic Bishops Speak Against Racism - In 2001, several bishops brought together a series of essays on the perspective of the different cultural families and on racism in general. Their insight remains relevant today and still relevant excerpts, collated in 2013, are available.
What We've Seen and Heard: A Pastoral Letter on Evangelization | En Español | Selected quotes
From the Black Bishops of the United States
September 9, 1984