Thursday, November 29, 2018

Wow Deaf Boy Disrupts Audience but Pope Francis gives him as an Example 'am I also free like that before God?' Watch Video

A young deaf boy made his way past security at Pope Francis' Wednesday Audience to touch the hand of the Swiss Guard. The mother rushed to explain: “We're from Argentina...”
 The pope smiled at the boy's actions and said: “He's Argentinian, undisciplined.” The little boy moved freely  on the stage and called his sister to join him.
 Pope Francis was touched and explained
“This boy can't talk, he is mute, but he knows how to communicate. He knows how to express himself. He has something that made me think. He is free. A undisciplined freedom... but he is free. It made me think, 'am I also free like that before God?' When Jesus says that we have to become like children, He tells us that we have to have the freedom that a child has before his father. I think he preached to all of us. Let's ask for the grace that this boy can speak.”

Cardinal Müller Defends Pope Francis against Viganò “No one has the right to indict the pope or ask him to resign!” in Interview


Andrea Tornielli, journalist for the Vatican Insider published an interview on Nov. 27, 2018. In the interview he speaks with German Cardinal Gerhard Müller, former prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. The lengthy interview covered many issues but notably the Cardinal came out in strong support of Pope Francis. In fact, in response to allegations by former Nuncio Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, Cardinal Müller rebukes him saying:
“No one has the right to indict the pope or ask him to resign!” 
Müller said, this referring to the Aug. 26, 2018 statement  by Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, nuncio to the U.S. from 2011-2016. In this statement Vigano accuses Francis of ignoring the sexual misconduct of ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick and asked him to resign. 
Cardinal Müller also commented on politics: "We are all united in the revealed faith, and not by the prejudices of political ideologies. We are not a political entity.” However, these conversations “must take place in private, in the proper places, and without ever making a public controversy,” he said, since “attacks” “end up questioning the credibility of the Church and her mission.”
In strong defense of Pope Francis, Müller said,
  "I am personally convinced that Pope Francis is doing everything possible to counter the phenomenon of child abuse and to foster a new spirituality for priests, who must act according to the heart of Christ and do the good of all people, especially children and young people".
 Cardinal Muller also defended Pope Francis' decision to postpone the American Bishops' conference on abuse saying:
"I thought it was necessary for the presidency of the American Bishops' Conference to first consult with our experts at the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. The Holy Father is a single person, he cannot deal with everything. That is why there are the departments of the Roman Curia, to collaborate and arrive at a well-developed proposal to bring to the Pope".
When asked about accusations that Pope Francis appoints bad bishops Cardinal Müller explained: "Even today it is possible that the Pope may appoint a person who is "false", who is not suitable for the role, for the episcopate. Jesus Christ himself, even though he knew everything thanks to his divine intellect, left freedom to the traitor Judas. Everyone is then responsible for their sin: we can, through the process of selection with the Congregations, through all our human judgments, do everything possible to elect a good candidate. But the Pope is not responsible for what these bishops then do, as the bishops are not responsible for everything their priests do. Everyone is personally responsible for the evil they commit".
Quotations from Interview by LaStampa - Vatican Insider by Andrea Tornielli

Pope Francis "Hope is our strength for moving forward. But we must ask it of the Holy Spirit.” #Homily


Pope at Mass: ‘So-called Christian societies will end if pagan'
In his homily at Mass in the Casa Santa Marta on Thursday, Pope Francis reflects on the end of the world and says the Christian life cannot be reconciled with a worldly mentality.
Pope Francis turned his thoughts at Mass on Thursday to the end of the world. He took his cue from the readings of the day from the Book of Revelations, which describes the destruction of Babylon, a symbol of worldliness, and from the Gospel of Luke (21:20-28), in which Jesus tells of the devastation of Jerusalem, the holy city.
The fall of Babylon
On the day of judgment, Babylon will be destroyed with a mighty cry of victory, the Pope said. The great harlot will fall, he said, condemned by the Lord, and she will show her truth: “a haunt for demons, a cage for every unclean spirit.”
Pope Francis said that corruption will be revealed under her magnificent beauty and that her feasts will be exposed as false happiness.
“The melodies of musicians, harpists, flutists, and trumpeters will never be heard in you again. There will be no more beautiful feasts… Craftsmen of every type will never be found in you again; because you are not a city of work but of corruption. The sound of the millstone will not be heard in you again; no lamplight will be seen in you again. The city may be illuminated, but she will be without light, not luminous. Hers is a corrupt society – the voices of brides and grooms will never be heard in you again. There were many couples, many people, but there will no longer be any love. This destruction starts from within and ends when the Lord says: ‘Enough’. And there will come a day when the Lord says: ‘Enough with the appearances of this world.’ This is the crisis of a society that sees itself as proud, self-sufficient, dictatorial, and it ends in this manner.”
Jerusalem opened her heart to pagans
Pope Francis then turned to the fate of Jerusalem. She will see her ruin, he said, in another type of corruption, “the corruption that comes from unfaithfulness to love; she was not able to recognize the love of God in His Son.” The holy city will be “trampled underfoot by pagans” and punished by the Lord, the Pope said, because she opened the doors of her heart to pagans.
“The paganization of life can occur, in our case the Christian life. Do we live as Christians? It seems like we do. But really our life in pagan, when these things happen: when we are seduced by Babylon and Jerusalem lives like Babylon. The two seek a synthesis which cannot be effected. And both are condemned. Are you a Christian? Are you Christian? Live like a Christian. Water and oil do not mix. They are always distinct. A contradictory society that professes Christianity but lives like a pagan shall end.”
Salvation for those who hope in the Lord
Returning to the two readings, Pope Francis said that, after the condemnation of the two cities, the voice of the Lord will be heard: Salvation follows destruction. “And the Angel said: ‘Come: Blessed are those who have been called to the wedding feast of the Lamb.’ The great feast; the true feast,” he said.
“Faced with the tragedies of life, we are called to look to the horizon, because we have been redeemed and the Lord will come to save us. This teaches us to live the trials of the world, not in a compromise with worldliness or paganism which brings about our destruction, but in hope, separating ourselves from this worldly and pagan seduction by looking to the horizon and hoping in Christ the Lord. Hope is our strength for moving forward. But we must ask it of the Holy Spirit.”
The humble remain after all collapses
Finally, Pope Francis invited us to think about the Babylonians of our time and about the many powerful empires of the last century which have fallen.
“The great cities of today will also end,” he said, “and so will our lives, if we continue along this road towards paganism.” The Pope said the only ones who will remain are those who place their hope in the Lord. “Let us open our hearts with hope and distance ourselves from the paganization of life.” FULL TEXT Source: Vatican News va

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Thurs. November 29, 2018 - #Eucharist


Thursday of the Thirty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 506

Reading 1RV 18:1-2, 21-23; 19:1-3, 9A

I, John, saw another angel coming down from heaven,
having great authority,
and the earth became illumined by his splendor.
He cried out in a mighty voice:

"Fallen, fallen is Babylon the great.
She has become a haunt for demons.
She is a cage for every unclean spirit,
a cage for every unclean bird,
a cage for every unclean and disgusting beast."

A mighty angel picked up a stone like a huge millstone
and threw it into the sea and said:

"With such force will Babylon the great city be thrown down,
and will never be found again.
No melodies of harpists and musicians,
flutists and trumpeters,
will ever be heard in you again.
No craftsmen in any trade
will ever be found in you again.
No sound of the millstone
will ever be heard in you again.
No light from a lamp
will ever be seen in you again.
No voices of bride and groom
will ever be heard in you again.
Because your merchants were the great ones of the world,
all nations were led astray by your magic potion."

After this I heard what sounded like
the loud voice of a great multitude in heaven, saying:

"Alleluia!
Salvation, glory, and might belong to our God,
for true and just are his judgments.
He has condemned the great harlot
who corrupted the earth with her harlotry.
He has avenged on her the blood of his servants."

They said a second time:

"Alleluia! Smoke will rise from her forever and ever."

Then the angel said to me, "Write this:
Blessed are those who have been called
to the wedding feast of the Lamb."

Responsorial PsalmPS 100:1B-2, 3, 4, 5

R. (Rev. 19: 9a) Blessed are they who are called to the wedding feast of the Lamb.
Sing joyfully to the LORD, all you lands;
serve the LORD with gladness;
come before him with joyful song.
R. Blessed are they who are called to the wedding feast of the Lamb.
Know that the LORD is God;
he made us, his we are;
his people, the flock he tends.
R. Blessed are they who are called to the wedding feast of the Lamb.
Enter his gates with thanksgiving,
his courts with praise;
Give thanks to him; bless his name.
R. Blessed are they who are called to the wedding feast of the Lamb.
For he is good:
the LORD, whose kindness endures forever,
and his faithfulness, to all generations.
R. Blessed are they who are called to the wedding feast of the Lamb.

AlleluiaLK 21:28

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Stand erect and raise your heads
because your redemption is at hand.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Gospel LK 21:20-28

Jesus said to his disciples:
"When you see Jerusalem surrounded by armies,
know that its desolation is at hand.
Then those in Judea must flee to the mountains.
Let those within the city escape from it,
and let those in the countryside not enter the city,
for these days are the time of punishment
when all the Scriptures are fulfilled.
Woe to pregnant women and nursing mothers in those days,
for a terrible calamity will come upon the earth
and a wrathful judgment upon this people.
They will fall by the edge of the sword
and be taken as captives to all the Gentiles;
and Jerusalem will be trampled underfoot by the Gentiles
until the times of the Gentiles are fulfilled.

"There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars,
and on earth nations will be in dismay,
perplexed by the roaring of the sea and the waves.
People will die of fright
in anticipation of what is coming upon the world,
for the powers of the heavens will be shaken.
And then they will see the Son of Man
coming in a cloud with power and great glory.
But when these signs begin to happen,
stand erect and raise your heads
because your redemption is at hand."

Saint November 29 : St. Saturninus : #Missionary and Martyr

MISSIONARY AND MARTYR Feast: November 29
Born:
third century, Patras, Greece
Died:
257, Toulouse, France
Canonized:
Basilique St-Sernin, Toulouse
Patron of:
Toulouse, France

St. Saturninus was, says Tillemont, one of the most illustrious martyrs France has given to the Church. We possess only his Acts, which are very old, since they were utilized by St. Gregory of Tours. He was the first bishop of Toulouse, whither he went during the consulate of Decius and Gratus (250). Whether there were already Christians in the town or his preaching made numerous conversions, he soon had a little church. To reach it he had to pass before the capitol where there was a a temple, and according to the Acts, the pagan priests ascribed to his frequent passings the silence of their oracles. One day they seized him and on his unshakeable refusal to sacrifice to the idols they condemned him be tied by the feet to a bull which dragged him about the town until the rope broke. Two Christian women piously gathered up the remains and buried them in a deep ditch, that they might not be profaned by the pagans. His successors, Sts. Hilary and Exuperius, gave him more honourable burial. A church was erected where the bull stopped. It still exists, and is called the church of the Taur (the bull). The body of the saint was transferred at an early date and is still preserved in the Church of St. Sernin (or Saturninus), one of the most ancient and beautiful of Southern France. His feast was entered on the Hieronymian Martyrology for 29 November; his cult spread abroad. The account of his Acts was embellished with several details, and legends linked his name with the beginning of the churches of Eauze, Auch, Pamplona, and Amiens, but these are without historic foundations.
source The Catholic Encyclopedia