Sunday, December 2, 2018

Saint December 3 : St. Francis Xavier Patron of Missionaries; Precious Blood; Navigators; missions; plague

St. Francis Xavier
JESUIT PRIEST AND GREAT MISSIONARY Feast: December 3
Born:
April 7, 1506, Javier, NavarreDied:
December 3, 1552, China
Canonized:
March 12, 1622 by Gregory XV
Patron of:
African missions; Apostleship of Prayer; Australia; Bombay, India; China; East Indies; Fathers of the Precious Blood; foreign missions; Goa India; India; Tokyo, Japan; missionaries; Missioners of the Precious Blood; navigators; parish missions; plague epidemics; Propagation of the Faith
Born in the Castle of Xavier near Sanguesa, in Navarre, 7 April, 1506; died on the Island of Sancian near the coast of China, 2 December, 1552. In 1525, having completed a preliminary course of studies in his own country, Francis Xavier went to Paris, where he entered the college de Sainte-Barbe. Here he met the Savoyard, Pierre Favre, and a warm personal friendship sprang up between them. It was at this same college that St. Ignatius Loyola, who was already planning the foundation of the Society of Jesus, resided for a time as a guest in 1529. He soon won the confidence of the two young men; first Favre and later Xavier offered themselves with him in the formation of the Society. Four others, Lainez, Salmeron, Rodriguez, and Bobadilla, having joined them, the seven made the famous vow of Montmartre, 15 Aug., 1534.
After completing his studies in Paris and filling the post of teacher there for some time, Xavier left the city with his companions 15 November, 1536, and turned his steps to Venice, where he displayed zeal and charity in attending the sick in the hospitals. On 24 June, 1537, he received Holy orders with St. Ignatius. The following year he went to Rome, and after doing apostolic work there for some months, during the spring of 1539 he took part in the conferences which St. Ignatius held with his companions to prepare for the definitive foundation of the Society of Jesus. The order was approved verbally 3 September, and before the written approbation was secured, which was not until a year later, Xavier was appointed , at the earnest solicitation of the John III, King of Portugal, to evangelize the people of the East Indies. He left Rome 16 March, 1540, and reached Lisbon about June. Here he remained nine months, giving many admirable examples of apostolic zeal.
On 7 April, 1541, he embarked in a sailing vessel for India, and after a tedious and dangerous voyage landed at Goa, 6 May, 1542. The first five months he spent in preaching and ministering to the sick in the hospitals. He would go through the streets ringing a little bell and inviting the children to hear the word of God. When he had gathered a number, he would take them to a certain church and would there explain the catechism to them. About October, 1542, he started for the pearl fisheries of the extreme southern coast of the peninsula, desirous of restoring Christianity which, although introduced years before, had almost disappeared on account of the lack of priests. He devoted almost three years to the work of preaching to the people of Western India, converting many, and reaching in his journeys even the Island of Ceylon. Many were the difficulties and hardships which Xavier had to encounter at this time, sometimes on account of the cruel persecutions which some of the petty kings of the country carried on against the neophytes, and again because the Portuguese soldiers, far from seconding the work of the saint, retarded it by their bad example and vicious habits.
In the spring of 1545 Xavier started for Malacca. He laboured there for the last months of that year, and although he reaped an abundant spiritual harvest, he was not able to root out certain abuses, and was conscious that many sinners had resisted his efforts to bring them back to God. About January, 1546, Xavier left Malacca and went to Molucca Islands, where the Portuguese had some settlements, and for a year and a half he preached the Gospel to the inhabitants of Amboyna, Ternate, Baranura, and other lesser islands which it has been difficult to identify. It is claimed by some that during this expedition he landed on the island of Mindanao, and for this reason St. Francis Xavier has been called the first Apostle of the Philippines. But although this statement is made by some writers of the seventeenth century, and in the Bull of canonization issued in 1623, it is said that he preached the Gospel in Mindanao, up to the present time it has not been proved absolutely that St. Francis Xavier ever landed in the Philippines.
By July, 1547, he was again in Malacca. Here he met a Japanese called Anger (Han-Sir), from whom he obtained much information about Japan. His zeal was at once aroused by the idea of introducing Christanity into Japan, but for the time being the affairs of the Society demanded his presence at Goa, whither he went, taking Anger with him. During the six years that Xavier had been working among the infidels, other Jesuit missionaries had arrived at Goa, sent from Europe by St. Ignatius; moreover some who had been born in the country had been received into the Society. In 1548 Xavier sent these missionaries to the principal centres of India, where he had established missions, so that the work might be preserved and continued. He also established a novitiate and house of studies, and having received into the Society Father Cosme de Torres, a Spanish priest whom he had met in the Maluccas, he started with him and Brother Juan Fernandez for Japan towards the end of June, 1549. The Japanese Anger, who had been baptized at Goa and given the name of Pablo de Santa Fe, accompanied them.
They landed at the city of Kagoshima in Japan, 15 Aug., 1549. The entire first year was devoted to learning the Japanese language and translating into Japanese, with the help of Pablo de Santa Fe, the principal articles of faith and short treatises which were to be employed in preaching and catechizing. When he was able to express himself, Xavier began preaching and made some converts, but these aroused the ill will of the bonzes, who had him banished from the city. Leaving Kagoshima about August, 1550, he penetrated to the centre of Japan, and preached the Gospel in some of the cities of southern Japan. Towards the end of that year he reached Meaco, then the principal city of Japan, but he was unable to make any headway here because of the dissensions the rending the country. He retraced his steps to the centre of Japan, and during 1551 preached in some important cities, forming the nucleus of several Christian communities, which in time increased with extraordinary rapidity.
After working about two years and a half in Japan he left this mission in charge of Father Cosme de Torres and Brother Juan Fernandez, and returned to Goa, arriving there at the beginning of 1552. Here domestic troubles awaited him. Certain disagreements between the superior who had been left in charge of the missions, and the rector of the college, had to be adjusted. This, however, being arranged, Xavier turned his thoughts to China, and began to plan an expedition there. During his stay in Japan he had heard much of the Celestial Empire, and though he probably had not formed a proper estimate of his extent and greatness, he nevertheless understood how wide a field it afforded for the spread of the light of the Gospel. With the help of friends he arranged a commission or embassy the Sovereign of China, obtained from the Viceroy of India the appointment of ambassador, and in April, 1552, he left Goa. At Malacca the party encountered difficulties because the influential Portuguese disapproved of the expedition, but Xavier knew how to overcome this opposition, and in the autumn he arrived in a Portuguese vessel at the small island of Sancian near the coast of China. While planning the best means for reaching the mainland, he was taken ill, and as the movement of the vessel seemed to aggravate his condition, he was removed to the land, where a rude hut had been built to shelter him. In these wretched surroundings he breathed his last.
It is truly a matter of wonder that one man in the short space of ten years (6 May, 1542-2 December, 1552) could have visited so many countries, traversed so many seas, preached the Gospel to so many nations, and converted so many infidels. The incomparable apostolic zeal which animated him, and the stupendous miracles which God wrought through him, explain this marvel, which has no equal elsewhere. The list of the principal miracles may be found in the Bull of canonization. St. Francis Xavier is considered the greatest missionary since the time of the Apostles, and the zeal he displayed, the wonderful miracles he performed, and the great number of souls he brought to the light of true Faith, entitle him to this distinction. He was canonized with St. Ignatius in 1622, although on account of the death of Gregory XV, the Bull of canonization was not published until the following year.
The body of the saint is still enshrined at Goa in the church which formerly belonged to the Society. In 1614 by order of Claudius Acquaviva, General of the Society of Jesus, the right arm was severed at the elbow and conveyed to Rome, where the present altar was erected to receive it in the church of the Gesu.

The Catholic Encyclopedia

Top Advent Songs of All Time - SHARE - Beautiful #Advent #Music to Prepare for Christmas




Advent is a season in preparation for the Nativity of Jesus at Christmas. The term comes from the Latin word adventus, meaning "coming". This is a translation of the Greek word parousia, referring to the Second Coming of Christ.
Some of the most beautiful music has been composed for this season. The following are some of the most popular of all time...
1."O come, O come, Emmanuel" is a hymn for Advent. The original Latin is "Veni, Veni, Emmanuel."  The hymn is a metrical paraphrase of the O Antiphons, a series of plainchant antiphons attached to the Magnificat at Vespers over the final days before Christmas. The verses, correspond to the seven standard O Antiphons, in the following order: "Veni, veni Emmanuel!" = "O Come, O Come, Emmanuel" "Veni, O Jesse Virgula" = "O Come, Thou Rod of Jesse" "Veni, veni, O Oriens" = "O come, Thou Dayspring, from on high" "Veni, clavis Davidica" = "O come, Thou Key of David, come" "Veni, veni, Adonai" = "O come, Adonai, Lord of might"



2. "Gabriel's Message" or "The angel Gabriel from heaven came" (Basque: Birjina gaztetto bat zegoen) is a Basque Christmas folk carol about the Annunciation to the Virgin Mary by the archangel Gabriel. It uses the biblical account of that event (Luke, Chapter 1, verses 26-38) and Mary's Magnificat (Luke 1.46-55) with the opening lines. It was collected by Charles Bordes and then paraphrased into English by Sabine Baring-Gould.


3. O COME, DIVINE MESSIAH! Words: Abbé Simon J. Pellegrin, 1663-1745 English Translation of French Carol Venez Divin Messie Translator: Sister Mary of St. Philip, SND


4. The Advent of our God: Music: 16th Century French Carol MIDI / Noteworthy Composer Meter: 78.76.888 Often played as a processional during Advent Words: Charles Coffin, Paris Breviary, 1736 (Instantis adventum Dei); translated from Latin to English by John Chandler, Hymns of the Primitive Church, 1837. Music: Doncaster Samuel Wesley, in Psalms and Hymns for the Service of the Church, 1837 . Alternate tunes: Franconia (König), Harmonischer Liederschatz, 1738  St. Thomas (Williams), Aaron Williams, 1770


5. Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 62. Bible text Revelation 3:20 Chorale Nun komm, der  (Now come, Savior of the heathens) is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar for the first Sunday in Advent and first performed it on 2 December 1714.

 6. "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme" (Awake, the voice is calling) is a Lutheran hymn written in German by Philipp Nicolai, first published in 1599 together with "Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern". It appears in German hymnals and in several English hymnals in translations such as "Wake, Awake, for Night Is Flying".

Wow Eucharistic Procession through Hollywood - Watch the Video - #Eucharistic #Adoration can Change the World!

On the feast of Christ the King: 700 Hundred Catholics walked through Hollywood’s Walk of Fame in a beautiful Eucharistic procession for the poor. The event was organized by the Beloved Movement, which promotes discipleship and spiritual community.  The Hollywood Beloved Procession occurred after Mass at Blessed Sacrament Church on Nov. 17. As part of the event, volunteers on the walk sat and listened to some of the city’s homeless population on the street. Seminarians from St. John’s Seminary and Queen of the Angels led the procession. It was also attended by members of several religious orders, including the Friars and Sisters of the Poor Jesus and Daughters of St. Paul. The procession ended in the church parking lot with adoration, praise and worship, and silent prayers.

What is Advent? 3 Things to SHARE plus FREE #Advent Ressources


1. ADVENT comes from the Latin ad-venio, meaning to come to.
2. Advent is a period beginning with the Sunday nearest to the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle (30 November) and involving four Sundays. The first Sunday may be as early as 27 November, and then Advent has twenty-eight days, or as late as 3 December, giving the season only twenty-one days.
3. With Advent the ecclesiastical year begins in the Western churches. During this time the faithful are admonished

  • to prepare themselves worthily to celebrate the anniversary of the Lord's coming into the world as the incarnate God of love,
  • thus to make their souls fitting abodes for the Redeemer coming in Holy Communion and through grace, and
  • thereby to make themselves ready for His final coming as judge, at death and at the end of the world.
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Duration and ritual

In the Massthe Gloria in excelsis is not said. The Alleluia, however, is retained. During this time the solemnization of matrimony Benediction) cannot take place; which prohibition binds to the feast of Epiphany inclusively. The celebrant and sacred ministers use violet vestments.   An exception is made for the third Sunday (Gaudete Sunday), on which the vestments may be rose-coloured.   Flowers and relics of Saints are not to be placed on the altars during the Office and Masses of this time, except on the third Sunday. 

Historical origin

The preparation for the feast of the Nativity of Our Lord was not held before the feast itself 
existed, and of this we find no evidence before the end of the fourth century, when, according 
to Duchesne [Christian Worship (London, 1904), 260], it was celebrated throughout the 
whole Church,    Several synods had made laws about fasting to be observed during this time,. 


Beginning the Church's liturgical year, Advent (from, "ad-venire" in Latin or "to come to") 
is the season encompassing the four Sundays (and weekdays) leading up to the 
celebration of Christmas.
The Advent season is a time of preparation that directs our hearts and minds to 
Christ’s second coming at the end of time and also to the anniversary of the Lord’s 
birth on Christmas. The final days of Advent, from December 17 to December 24, 
focus particularly on our preparation for the celebrations of the Nativity of our Lord 
(Christmas).
Advent devotions including the Advent wreath, remind us of the meaning of the season. 
Our Advent calendar above can help you fully enter in to the season with daily activity and 
prayer suggestions to prepare you spiritually for the birth of Jesus Christ.  More Advent 
resources are listed below.

ADVENT RESOURCES

Pope Francis "Today begins Advent......Watch at all times praying " and Lights Candle for Peace - FULL TEXT + Video


ANGELUS

St. Peter's Square
Sunday, 2 December 2018

Dear brothers and sisters, good morning!

Today begins Advent, the liturgical season that prepares us for Christmas, inviting us to look up and open our hearts to welcome Jesus. In Advent we do not only live the wait for Christmas; we are also invited to awaken the expectation of the glorious return of Christ - when at the end of time he will return -, preparing for the final meeting with him with coherent and courageous choices. Let us remember Christmas, we await the glorious return of Christ, and also our personal encounter: the day on which the Lord will call. In these four weeks we are called to come out of a resigned and habitual way of life, and to go out, fueling hopes, fueling dreams for a new future. The Gospel of this Sunday (cf. Lk 21: 25-28.34-36) goes precisely in this direction and warns us to let ourselves be oppressed by an egocentric lifestyle or by the convulsive rhythms of the days. The words of Jesus are particularly incisive: "Be attentive to yourselves, that your hearts may not be weighed down in dissipations, drunkenness and cares of life, and that on that day you will not suddenly come upon us. [...] Watch at all times praying "(verses 34.36).

Stay awake and pray: this is how you live this time from today until Christmas. Stay awake and pray. Inner sleep arises from always turning around ourselves and from being stuck in the closed of one's life with its problems, its joys and its sorrows, but always turning around ourselves. And this tired, this bored, this closes to hope. Here is the root of the torpor and laziness of which the Gospel speaks. Advent invites us to a vigilant commitment, looking outside ourselves, enlarging our mind and our heart to open ourselves to the needs of the people, of the brothers, to the desire for a new world. It is the desire of so many peoples tormented by hunger, injustice, war; it is the desire of the poor, the weak, the abandoned. This time is appropriate to open our hearts, to ask us concrete questions about how and for whom we spend our lives.

The second attitude to live well the time of waiting for the Lord is that of prayer. "Stand up and raise your head, because your liberation is near" (verse 28), admonishes the Gospel of Luke. It is a matter of getting up and praying, turning our thoughts and our hearts to Jesus who is about to come. You get up when you wait for something or someone. We wait for Jesus, we want him to wait in prayer, which is closely linked to vigilance. To pray, to wait for Jesus, to open up to others, to be awake, not closed in ourselves. But if we think of Christmas in an atmosphere of consumerism, of seeing what I can buy to do this and this other, of the worldly festival, Jesus will pass and we will not find him. We await Jesus and we want him to wait in prayer, which is closely linked to vigilance.

But what is the horizon of our prayerful waiting? Above all, the voices of the prophets indicate this in the Bible. Today it is that of Jeremiah, who speaks to the people harshly tried by exile and who risks losing his identity. Even we Christians, who are also the people of God, risk to mingle ourselves and lose our identity, indeed, to "paganize" the Christian style. Therefore we need the Word of God that through the prophet proclaims: "Behold, there will come days when I will fulfill the promises of good that I have done [...]. I will sprout for David a just seed, which will exercise judgment and justice on earth "(33: 14-15). And that just seed is Jesus, it is Jesus who comes and we await. May the Virgin Mary, who brings us Jesus, woman of expectation and prayer, help us to strengthen our hope in the promises of her Son Jesus, to make us experience that, through the travail of history, God always remains faithful and also serves of human errors to show his mercy.


After the Angelus

Dear brothers and sisters,

Advent is a time of hope. At this moment I would like to make my own the hope of peace for the children of Syria, the beloved Syria, tormented by a war that has lasted eight years. For this reason, by adhering to the initiative of "Aid to the Church in Need", I will now light a candle, along with many children who will do the same, Syrian children and many faithful in the world who today light their candles [lit the candle].
This flame of hope and many flames of hope disperse the darkness of war! We pray and help Christians stay in Syria and the Middle East as witnesses of mercy, forgiveness and reconciliation. The flame of hope also reaches all those who suffer in these days conflicts and tensions in various other parts of the world, near and far. The prayer of the Church helps them to feel the proximity of the faithful God and touches every conscience for a sincere commitment to peace. And that God, our Lord, forgive those who make war, those who make weapons to destroy themselves and convert their hearts. We pray for peace in beloved Syria.

["Ave Maria…"]

I address my greeting to you, Romans and pilgrims, present here; in particular those coming from Linden, in the United States of America, Valencia and Pamplona; as well as the students and professors of the "Claret" College of Madrid.

I greet the polyphonic choir of Modica, the faithful of Altamura, Conversano and Laterza. I wish everyone a good Sunday and a good Advent journey. Please do not forget to pray for me. Good lunch and goodbye!

Sunday Mass Online : Sun. December 2, 2018 - #Eucharist #1stAdvent - Reading + Video

First Sunday of Advent
Lectionary: 3

Reading 1JER 33:14-16

The days are coming, says the LORD,
when I will fulfill the promise
I made to the house of Israel and Judah.
In those days, in that time,
I will raise up for David a just shoot ;
he shall do what is right and just in the land.
In those days Judah shall be safe
and Jerusalem shall dwell secure;
this is what they shall call her:
“The LORD our justice.”

Responsorial PsalmPS 25:4-5, 8-9, 10, 14

R. (1b) To you, O Lord, I lift my soul.
Your ways, O LORD, make known to me;
teach me your paths,
Guide me in your truth and teach me,
for you are God my savior,
and for you I wait all the day.
R. To you, O Lord, I lift my soul.
Good and upright is the LORD;
thus he shows sinners the way.
He guides the humble to justice,
and teaches the humble his way.
R. To you, O Lord, I lift my soul.
All the paths of the LORD are kindness and constancy
toward those who keep his covenant and his decrees.
The friendship of the LORD is with those who fear him,
and his covenant, for their instruction.
R. To you, O Lord, I lift my soul.

Reading 21 THES 3:12—4:2

Brothers and sisters:
May the Lord make you increase and abound in love
for one another and for all,
just as we have for you,
so as to strengthen your hearts,
to be blameless in holiness before our God and Father
at the coming of our Lord Jesus with all his holy ones. Amen.

Finally, brothers and sisters,
we earnestly ask and exhort you in the Lord Jesus that,
as you received from us
how you should conduct yourselves to please God
and as you are conducting yourselves
you do so even more.
For you know what instructions we gave you through the Lord Jesus.

AlleluiaPS 85:8

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Show us, Lord, your love;
and grant us your salvation.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelLK 21:25-28, 34-36

Jesus said to his disciples:
“There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars,
and on earth nations will be in dismay,
perplexed by the roaring of the sea and the waves.
People will die of fright
in anticipation of what is coming upon the world,
for the powers of the heavens will be shaken.
And then they will see the Son of Man
coming in a cloud with power and great glory.
But when these signs begin to happen,
stand erect and raise your heads
because your redemption is at hand.

“Beware that your hearts do not become drowsy
from carousing and drunkenness
and the anxieties of daily life,
and that day catch you by surprise like a trap.
For that day will assault everyone
who lives on the face of the earth.
Be vigilant at all times
and pray that you have the strength
to escape the tribulations that are imminent
and to stand before the Son of Man.”