Sunday, June 30, 2019

Saint July 1 : Saint Junípero Serra the Great Franciscan Spanish Missionary of California


Saint Junípero Serra
MISSIONARY
Feast: July 1 
Information:Feast Day:July 1

Born:
24 November 1713 at Petra, Spanish Majorca
Died:
28 August 1784Beatified:
25 September 1988 by Pope John Paul II 
Born at Petra, Island of Majorca, 24 November, 1713; died at Monterey, California, 28 August, 1784.
Born at Petra, Majorca, Spain, November 24, 1713, a son of Antonio Nadal Serra and Margarita Rosa Ferrer who spent their lives as farmers, Junípero Serra was baptized on the same day at St. Peter’s Church and was given the name Miguel José.
In Petra, Serra attended the primary school of the Franciscans. At 15-years-old, he was taken by his parents to Palma to be placed in the charge of a cathedral canon, and he began to assist at classes in philosophy held in the Franciscan monastery of San Francisco.
Serra was admitted as a novice at the Convento de Jesús outside the walls of Palma on September 14, 1730, and made his profession on September 15, the following year. He chose the name Junípero in memory of the brother companion of St. Francis. He studied philosophy and theology at the Convento de San Francisco. The date of his ordination to the priesthood is not known, though it probably occurred during the Ember Days of December 1738.  Serra obtained his doctorate in theology in 1742 from the Lullian University, Palma. He was called to the Scotistic chair of theology at the same university as primary professor in January 1749 to become an Indian missionary in America.
On April 13, 1749, with Francisco Palóu, Serra sailed for America. He landed in Vera Cruz, Mexico on December 7, 1749. Although horses were supplied for the friars, Serra elected to walk the 250 miles between Vera Cruz and Mexico City. They reached San Fernando College on January 1, 1750, spending the previous night at the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe.
In less than six months, an urgent call came for volunteers for the Sierra Gorda missions. Serra was among the volunteers. During his apostolate in Sierra Gorda with the Pame Indians between 1750 and 1758, Serra not only oversaw construction of a church, which is still in use, but developed his mission in both religious and economic directions. Under his presidency of the missions (1751-1754), the missionaries of the other four towns also built mission churches.  
Serra learned the Otomí language and used a visual method of teaching religion. Zealous in preaching and in promoting both liturgical and popular devotions, he succeeded in bringing the Pame people to practice the faith in an exemplary way. Economically his mission prospered through the introduction of domestic animals, the fostering of agriculture, and the development of commerce. He also defended Indian rights against non-native settlers in a protracted contest over the valley of Tancama. During building operations on his church, he worked as an ordinary day laborer.
He was then assigned to the college of San Fernando, where he arrived September 26, 1758. There he was made choir director, master of novices from 1761 to 1764, college counselor from 1758 to 1761, and a confessor. As a home missionary Serra preached missions in Mexico City, Mezquital, Zimapan, Río Vero, Puebla and Oaxaca. In 1767, he was appointed president of the ex-Jesuit missions of Baja California.
He set out in mid-July and reached Loreto on April 1. Serra resided at the former Jesuit headquarters and assigned missionaries to the 15 missions between San José del Cabo in the south and Santa María in the north. Serra enthusiastically volunteered in 1768 to join expeditions to Upper California. On March 28, 1769, Serra left the mission at Loreto on mule-back, arriving at San Diego on July 1. En route, he founded his first mission at San Fernando de Velicatá on May 14. Serra kept a diary of his journey during which he suffered greatly from an infirmity in his legs and feet and had to be carried on a stretcher.
Serra devoted the next 15 years of his life to evangelical work in Upper California. During that period he founded nine missions: San Diego, July 16, 1769; San Carlos, Monterey-Carmel, June 3, 1770; San Antonio, July 14, 1771; San Gabriel, September 8, 1771; San Luis Obispo, September 1, 1772, San Francisco, October 9, 1776; San Juan Capistrano, November 1, 1776; Santa Clara, January 12, 1777; and San Buenaventura, March 31, 1782. He was present at the founding of Presidio Santa Barbara, April 12, 1782.
Serra remained at San Diego until April 14, 1770, when he embarked for Monterey. From June 3, 1770, until his death, he maintained his headquarters at Mission San Carlos. Serra died at Mission San Carlos, August 28, 1784, at the age of 70 and is buried in the floor of the sanctuary of the church he had built. By the end of 1784, Indian baptisms at the first nine missions reached the number 6,736, while 4,646 Christianized Indians were living in them.
Serra was small of stature, five feet two inches in height. He had a sonorous voice, swarthy skin, dark hair and eyes. Though it appears that he had a fundamentally robust constitution, he suffered a great deal during the latter part of his life. His first affliction was the swelling and painful itching of his feet and legs from mosquito bites which caused varicose ulcers. At times he could neither stand nor walk. After 1758 he began to suffer from asthma. 
In character Serra was eager, optimistic, zealous, dynamic, even adamantine. Primarily a man of action, he preferred the active apostolate to the classroom or to writing. He remained a model religious despite his distractions and activity — a man of prayer and mortification. He had a consuming love for his American converts. He fought for the freedom of the Church against royal infringement. Serra was considered by some too aggressive, zealous, and demanding. Though he defended the Indians, he had a paternalistic view and believed in and practiced corporal punishment.
The cause for Serra’s beatification began in the Diocese of Monterey-Fresno in 1934, and the diocesan process was finished in 1949. On September 25, 1988 he was beatified by Pope John Paul II. Pope Francis canonized Junipero Serra on September 23, 2015. during a Mass in Washington, DC.
Serra monuments and memorials dot his Camino Real from Majorca to California. He is the subject of several dozen biographies in various languages. His writings with translation have been published in four volumes by Rev. Antonine Tibesar, OFM. He is known as the Apostle of California. Serra International was established in his honor. His life and his mission system are studied in California schools.
Edited from the official biography at https://sbfranciscans.org/about/blessed-junipero-serra

Pope Francis explains "- the Church is sent! - to bring the Gospel to the streets and reach the human and existential suburbs." Full Text + Video


ANGELUS

St. Peter's Square
Sunday, June 30, 2019

Dear brothers and sisters, good morning!

In today's Gospel (see Lk 9: 51-62), St. Luke begins the story of Jesus' last journey to Jerusalem, which will end at chapter 19. It is a long march not only geographical and spatial, but spiritual and theological towards the fulfillment of the mission of the Messiah. Jesus' decision is radical and total, and those who follow him are called to measure themselves against it. Today the Evangelist presents us with three characters - three cases of vocation, we could say - that highlight what is required of those who want to follow Jesus fully, totally.

The first character promises to him: "I will follow you wherever you go" (v. 57). Generous! But Jesus replies that the Son of man, unlike the foxes that have the dens and the birds that have nests, "has nowhere to lay his head" (v. 58). The absolute poverty of Jesus. Jesus, in fact, left the paternal home and renounced all security to announce the Kingdom of God to the lost sheep of his people. Thus Jesus indicated to us his disciples that our mission in the world cannot be static, but is itinerant. The Christian is an itinerant. The Church by its nature is in movement, it is not sedentary and tranquil in its own enclosure. It is open to the widest horizons, sent - the Church is sent! - to bring the Gospel to the streets and reach the human and existential suburbs. This is the first character.

The second character that Jesus meets receives the call directly from him, but he replies: "Lord, let me go first to bury my father" (v. 59). It is a legitimate request, founded on the commandment to honor the father and mother (see Ex 20,12). However, Jesus replies: "Let the dead bury their dead" (v. 60). With these deliberately provocative words, he intends to affirm the primacy of following and announcing the Kingdom of God, even on the most important realities, such as the family. The urgency to communicate the Gospel, which breaks the chain of death and inaugurates eternal life, does not admit delays, but requires readiness and availability. Therefore, the Church is itinerant, and here the Church is decisive, it acts quickly, at the moment, without waiting.

The third character also wants to follow Jesus but on one condition: he will do so after going to take leave of relatives. And this is said by the Master: "No one who puts his hand to the plow and then turns back is suitable for the kingdom of God" (v. 62). The following of Jesus excludes regrets and looks backwards, but requires the virtue of decision.

The Church, in order to follow Jesus, is itinerant, acts immediately, in a hurry, and resolutely. The value of these conditions set by Jesus - itinerancy, readiness and decision - does not lie in a series of "no" sayings to good and important things in life. The accent, rather, should be placed on the main objective: to become a disciple of Christ! A free and conscious choice, made out of love, to reciprocate the priceless grace of God, and not made as a way to promote oneself. This is sad! Woe to those who think they are following Jesus to promote themselves, that is, to make a career, to feel important or to acquire a place of prestige. Jesus wants us passionate about Him and the Gospel. A passion of the heart that translates into concrete gestures of closeness, of closeness to the brothers most in need of welcome and care. Just like he himself lived.

May the Virgin Mary, icon of the Church on the way, help us to follow the Lord Jesus with joy and to announce to the brothers, with renewed love, the Good News of salvation.

After the Angelus

Dear brothers and sisters!

In recent hours we have witnessed a good example of meeting culture in Korea. I greet the protagonists, with the prayer that this significant gesture constitutes a further step on the path of peace, not only on that peninsula but in favor of the whole world.

On the last day of June, I wish all workers a rest period during the summer, which will benefit them and their families.

I pray for those who in these days have suffered the most from the consequences of the heat: the sick, the elderly, people who have to work outdoors, on construction sites ... No one is abandoned or exploited.

And now I address my cordial greeting to all of you, Romans and pilgrims: families, church groups, associations.

In particular I greet the group of Sisters of Saint Elizabeth and the pilgrims who came by bicycle from Sartirana Lomellina. I see that there are so many Poles ... I greet the Poles. Bravi!

I wish you all a good Sunday. Please don't forget to pray for me. Good lunch and goodbye.

Sunday Mass Online : Sun. June 30, 2019 - #Eucharist - Reading + Video - 13th Ord. Time

Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 99

Reading 11 KGS 19:16B, 19-21

The LORD said to Elijah:
"You shall anoint Elisha, son of Shaphat of Abelmeholah,
as prophet to succeed you."

Elijah set out and came upon Elisha, son of Shaphat,
as he was plowing with twelve yoke of oxen;
he was following the twelfth.
Elijah went over to him and threw his cloak over him.
Elisha left the oxen, ran after Elijah, and said,
"Please, let me kiss my father and mother goodbye,
and I will follow you."
Elijah answered, "Go back!
Have I done anything to you?"
Elisha left him, and taking the yoke of oxen, slaughtered them;
he used the plowing equipment for fuel to boil their flesh,
and gave it to his people to eat.
Then Elisha left and followed Elijah as his attendant.

Responsorial PsalmPS 16:1-2, 5, 7-8, 9-10, 11

R. (cf. 5a) You are my inheritance, O Lord.
Keep me, O God, for in you I take refuge;
 I say to the LORD, "My Lord are you.
O LORD, my allotted portion and my cup,
 you it is who hold fast my lot."
R. You are my inheritance, O Lord.
I bless the LORD who counsels me;
 even in the night my heart exhorts me.
I set the LORD ever before me;
 with him at my right hand I shall not be disturbed.
R. You are my inheritance, O Lord.
Therefore my heart is glad and my soul rejoices,
 my body, too, abides in confidence
because you will not abandon my soul to the netherworld,
 nor will you suffer your faithful one to undergo corruption.
R. You are my inheritance, O Lord.
You will show me the path to life,
 fullness of joys in your presence,
 the delights at your right hand forever.
R. You are my inheritance, O Lord.

Reading 2GAL 5:1, 13-18

Brothers and sisters:
For freedom Christ set us free;
so stand firm and do not submit again to the yoke of slavery.

For you were called for freedom, brothers and sisters.
But do not use this freedom
as an opportunity for the flesh;
rather, serve one another through love.
For the whole law is fulfilled in one statement,
namely, You shall love your neighbor as yourself.
But if you go on biting and devouring one another,
beware that you are not consumed by one another.

I say, then: live by the Spirit
and you will certainly not gratify the desire of the flesh.
For the flesh has desires against the Spirit,
and the Spirit against the flesh;
these are opposed to each other,
so that you may not do what you want.
But if you are guided by the Spirit, you are not under the law.

Alleluia1 SM 3:9; JN 6:68C

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Speak, Lord, your servant is listening;
you have the words of everlasting life.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelLK 9:51-62

When the days for Jesus' being taken up were fulfilled,
he resolutely determined to journey to Jerusalem,
and he sent messengers ahead of him.
On the way they entered a Samaritan village
to prepare for his reception there,
but they would not welcome him
because the destination of his journey was Jerusalem.
When the disciples James and John saw this they asked,
"Lord, do you want us to call down fire from heaven
to consume them?"
Jesus turned and rebuked them, and they journeyed to another village.

As they were proceeding on their journey someone said to him,
"I will follow you wherever you go."
Jesus answered him,
"Foxes have dens and birds of the sky have nests,
but the Son of Man has nowhere to rest his head."

And to another he said, "Follow me."
But he replied, "Lord, let me go first and bury my father."
But he answered him, "Let the dead bury their dead.
But you, go and proclaim the kingdom of God."
And another said, "I will follow you, Lord,
but first let me say farewell to my family at home."
To him Jesus said, "No one who sets a hand to the plow
and looks to what was left behind is fit for the kingdom of God."

Saint June 30 : Protomartyrs of Rome - who suffered Death under Emperor Nero in #Rome


Feast: June 30

Information: Feast Day:June 30
Many martyrs who suffered death under Emperor Nero (r. 54-68). Owing to their executions durin the reign of Nero, they are called the Neronian Martyrs, and they are also termed "the Protomartys of Rome," being honored by the site in the Vatican City called the Piazza of the Protomartyrs. These early Christians were disciples of the Apostles, and they endured hideous tortures and ghastly deaths following the burning of Rome in the infamous fire of 62. Their dignity in suffering, and their fervor to the end, did not provide Nero or the Romans with the public diversion desired. Instead, the faith was firmly planted in the Eternal City.

(Taken from Our Sunday Visitor's Encyclopedia of Saints)