Monday, July 15, 2019

Saint July 16 : Our Lady of Mount Carmel honoring the day Our Lady gave the Scapular to St. Simon #MountCarmel

This feast was instituted by the Carmelites between 1376 and 1386 under the title "Commemoratio B. Marif Virg. duplex" to celebrate the victory of their order over its enemies on obtaining the approbation of its name and constitution from Honorius III on 30 Jan., 1226 (see Colvenerius, "Kal. Mar.", 30 Jan. "Summa Aurea", III, 737). The feast was assigned to 16 July, because on that date in 1251, according to Carmelite traditions, the scapular was given by the Blessed Virgin to St. Simon Stock; it was first approved by Sixtus V in 1587. After Cardinal Bellarmine had examined the Carmelite traditions in 1609, it was declared the patronal feast of the order, and is now celebrated in the Carmelite calendar as a major double of the first class with a vigil and a privileged octave (like the octave of Epiphany, admitting only a double of the first class) under the title "Commemoratio solemnis B.V.M. de Monte Carmelo". By a privilege given by Clement X in 1672, some Carmelite monasteries keep the feast on the Sunday after 16 July, or on some other Sunday in July. In the seventeenth century the feast was adopted by several dioceses in the south of Italy, although its celebration, outside of Carmelite churches, was prohibited in 1628 by a decree contra abusus. On 21 Nov., 1674, however, it was first granted by Clement X to Spain and its colonies, in 1675 to Austria, in 1679 to Portugal and its colonies, and in 1725 to the Papal States of the Church, on 24 Sept., 1726, it was extended to the entire Latin Church by Benedict XIII. The lessons contain the legend of the scapular; the promise of the Sabbatine privilege was inserted into the lessons by Paul V about 1614. The Greeks of southern Italy and the Catholic Chaldeans have adopted this feast of the "Vestment of the Blessed Virgin Mary". The object of the feast is the special predilection of Mary for those who profess themselves her servants by wearing her scapular. Text from the Catholic Encyclopedia


Novena to Our Lady of Mount Carmel - #Miracle #Prayer SHARE

Unexpected Death of Aux. Dominican Bishop in San Francisco - RIP Beloved Bishop Robert Christian


Press Release from Archdiocese of San Francisco:
ANNOUNCEMENT FROM ARCHBISHOP SALVATORE J. CORDILEONE: 
July 11, 2019

Auxiliary Bishop Robert Christian has died unexpectedly at his residence at St. Patrick Seminary & University in Menlo Park.  Bishop Christian was appointed rector of the Seminary on January 14 of this year.

I was deeply saddened to learn this morning of his passing.  The Archdiocese was greatly blessed to have his wisdom and leadership even if for so brief a time as auxiliary bishop and even briefer time as rector of the Seminary.  We join with the Dominican community in praying for the repose of his soul and for peace and comfort for his wonderful family in their time of mourning.

Robert Francis Christian was born in San Francisco in 1948 to Robert Francis and Gloria Jean Christian. He was raised in San Francisco, where he attended St. Brendan and St. Vincent de Paul grammar schools and St. Ignatius High School. In 1970, after graduating from Santa Clara University, he entered the Dominican Order in Oakland.

Fr. Robert was ordained in 1976, and in 1977 he began teaching at Dominican College of San Rafael. He went to Rome in 1979 for doctoral studies, and upon completion of his doctorate, ministered at the Newman Centers at the University of California in Riverside and the University of Washington in Seattle.

Fr. Robert was assigned to the faculty of the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas (the Angelicum) in Rome in 1985. Except for the years 1997-1999, when he was vicar provincial of the Western Dominican Province headquartered in Oakland, Fr. Robert taught theology, ministered to the Dominican community in Rome, held administrative offices at the Angelicum, and offered occasional assistance to various Vatican bureaus, until 2014.

Prior to becoming bishop he was the Student Master at St. Albert Priory in Oakland. At the time of his death he was a member of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission and a consultor to the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity.

On March 28, 2018, he was named an auxiliary bishop by Pope Francis.  On June 5, 2018, he was ordained a bishop at St. Mary’s Cathedral.  Shortly thereafter, on January 14, 2019, he became rector of St. Patrick’s Seminary & University.

Eternal rest grant unto him, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon him. May he rest in peace. Amen.
May his soul and the souls of all the faithful departed,through the mercy of God, rest in peace. Amen.

###

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
All are welcome. Further information will be added as it is known.

VISITATION: Monday, July 22, 5:00-7:00 pm
VIGIL:  Monday, July 22, 7:00 pm
Saint Dominic Church, 2390 Bush Street, San Francisco
 
FUNERAL MASS: Tuesday, July 23, 10:00 am
Reception following
Cathedral of St. Mary of the Assumption, 1111 Gough Street, San Francisco

BURIAL: Will take place at a later date
St. Dominic Cemetery, Benicia

Trying to Solve a Mystery the Vatican continues Investigation of Cemetery after Missing Daughter Emanuela Orlandi not Found

Vatican News reports that the identification of two ossuaries in the Vatican’s Teutonic Cemetery has led to the decision to continue investigations into the whereabouts of two princesses whose tombs were found to be empty. The opening of the tombs was in response to an investigation to find the body of a missing girl named Emanuela Orlandi. The 15 year-old-daughter of a Vatican bank employee, whose family lived inside Vatican City, disappeared on June 22, 1983.

 However, no human remains were found in the Vatican graves.


There are no human remains, no coffins, no urns and no bones in the two 19th century graves in the Teutonic Cemetery inside the Vatican where forensic experts were searching for the remains of Emanuela Orlandi.



A statement by the Holy See Press Office on Thursday confirmed that the operations at the Teutonic Cemetery to verify the hypothesis of the presence of human remains attributable to Emanuela Orlandi ended at 11.15 a.m. and have yielded negative results.

The statement said that investigations were carried out by staff of the Fabbrica di San Pietro in the presence of the Orlandi family's lawyer, and Emanuela's brother.

Vatican justice and police authorities were also present.

Two empty tombs
 “A careful inspection of the tomb of Princess Sophie von Hohenlohe brought to light a large underground space of about 4 meters by 3.70 that is completely empty. Subsequently, the second tomb, that of Princess Charlotte Federica of Mecklemburg was opened. No human remains were found inside. The relatives of the two Princesses were informed of the outcome of the search,” Gisotti said.

The Press Office director  informed the press that ulterior investigations are underway regarding structural interventions that took place in the cemetery area in two different periods: at the end of the 19th century and between  the ‘60s and ‘70s in the 20th century.

Gisotti highlighted how the Holy See has always shown sensitivity and closeness to the suffering of the Orlandi Family, in particular to Emanuela's mother. This sensitivity, he said, is demonstrated yet again on this occasion, by accepting the specific request of the family to go ahead with digging operations in the Vatican’s Teutonic Cemetery.

In an earlier statement, Gisotti said that operations to open the grave were preceded by a prayer.
Edited from a report by Linda Bordoni for Vatican News.va

#BreakingNews 9 people Killed and 12 Wounded in Suicide Bomb Attack at a Wedding - Please Pray


Peace still a distant goal after child carries out suicide attack at a wedding
The attack took place in Nangarhar, a stronghold of both the Islamic state and the Taliban, with the commander of a pro-government militia as the apparent target. This has derailed the road map for peace reached in Doha.


Kabul (AsiaNews) – A boy carried out a bomb attack at a wedding yesterday. The latest human tragedy to hit Afghanistan comes amid peace talks with Taliban after 18 years of civil war.

Some activists told AsiaNews that negotiations in Qatar are a failure. For Bismillah Watandost, spokesman for the People's Peace Movement (PPM), "The parties are not talking about real peace. We are still waiting for serious discussions. Meanwhile, everyone is trying to get the most for themselves. They are just wasting our time."

Yesterday at least nine people were killed and 12 others wounded in the attack in Pacheragam, a district in Nangarhar province. In addition to the child bomber, the blast killed Malek Tor, commander of a pro-government militia, and two of his sons. Investigators believe Tor was the target because his group is opposed to the Islamic State group and the Taliban.

For now, no one has claimed responsibility, but the area is a stronghold of both extremist groups. But the attack seems to have brought a coup-de-grace to the road map for peace reached this week in Doha.

The agreement calls for respect and protection of the dignity of the people, lives and property, as well as an end to civilian victims. However, just a few hours after it was reached other attacks caused more victims, including children. (A.C.F.)
Full Text Source AsiaNews IT

New Leader of the Dominican Order is from the Philippines the 1st Asian Appointed

Fr. Gerard Francisco Timoner III.

By CBCP News

July 13, 2019

Manila, Philippines

A Filipino priest has been elected the new global leader of the Dominican mission, the first Asian to hold the post.


Fr. Gerard Francisco Timoner III has been elected master of the Order of Preachers, also known as the Domincan Order. He will hold the position for nine years.

His election came during the ongoing General Chapter of the religious order in Biên Hoà, Vietnam, the first ever meeting of the order’s priors provincial in a non-Christian country.

Fr. Timoner was previously socius or assistant for Asia and the Pacific of the outgoing master, the Frechman Bruno Caderè, and head of the Filipino Dominicans.

In 2014, Pope Francis appointed him as member of the International Theological Commission, a 30-member Vatican body tasked to examine questions on doctrinal matters.

Fr. Timoner was born on Jan. 26, 1968 and is a native of Daet in Camarines Norte.

After obtaining his philosophy degree from the Philippine Dominican Center of International Studies and his theology from UST, he was ordained a priest in 1995.

In 2004, he finished his licentiate in sacred theology at the Catholic University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands.

The priest also served as vice rector for religious affairs and rector of the UST Central Seminary from 2007 to 2012.
Full Text Source: CBCP News

Easy Novena to St. Bonaventure - a Prayer to the Famous Franciscan and Doctor of the Church

Novena Prayer:
Dear St. Bonaventure Cardinal, Bishop and Doctor of the Church, you chose a life that embraced mortification and great humiliation. Choosing to serve those individuals who were rejected and sick you risked illness for yourself. You made your life a continuous prayer and spent hours meditating on the wounds of Christ. Please pray for us that we may have a sincere and humble heart. Pray that we may not lose sight of Jesus’ wounds and thus walk on the straight path to eternal salvation.
(For more on the Life of St. Bonaventure :
Saint July 15 : St. Bonaventure : Patron of Bowel Disorders - Doctor of the Church)

St. Bonaventure you were known to say “One should carefully beware of decreasing, even in the slightest, the honor that is due to Mary.” May we strive as you did to Love our Blessed Mother and be carriers of her peace in this world. May we take a great many souls with us to Our Heavenly Father.

Please place our petitions (mention them here) in the loving hands of Our Blessed Mother as we know they will be warmly received by her Son. Amen Say one Hail Mary. (pray the above prayer and Hail Mary daily for nine days for your intention)
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Today's Mass Readings and Video : Monday, July 15, 2019 - #Eucharist


Memorial of Saint Bonaventure, Bishop and Doctor of the Church
Lectionary: 389

Reading 1EX 1:8-14, 22

A new king, who knew nothing of Joseph, came to power in Egypt.
He said to his subjects, "Look how numerous and powerful
the people of the children of Israel are growing, more so than we ourselves!
Come, let us deal shrewdly with them to stop their increase;
otherwise, in time of war they too may join our enemies
to fight against us, and so leave our country."

Accordingly, taskmasters were set over the children of Israel
to oppress them with forced labor.
Thus they had to build for Pharaoh
the supply cities of Pithom and Raamses.
Yet the more they were oppressed,
the more they multiplied and spread.
The Egyptians, then, dreaded the children of Israel
and reduced them to cruel slavery,
making life bitter for them with hard work in mortar and brick
and all kinds of field work—the whole cruel fate of slaves.

Pharaoh then commanded all his subjects,
"Throw into the river every boy that is born to the Hebrews,
but you may let all the girls live."

Responsorial PsalmPS 124:1B-3, 4-6, 7-8

R.(8a) Our help is in the name of the Lord.
Had not the LORD been with us–
let Israel say, had not the LORD been with us–
When men rose up against us,
then would they have swallowed us alive,
When their fury was inflamed against us.
R. Our help is in the name of the Lord.
Then would the waters have overwhelmed us;
The torrent would have swept over us;
over us then would have swept
the raging waters.
Blessed be the LORD, who did not leave us
a prey to their teeth.
R. Our help is in the name of the Lord. 
We were rescued like a bird
from the fowlers' snare;
Broken was the snare,
and we were freed.
Our help is in the name of the LORD,
who made heaven and earth.
R. Our help is in the name of the Lord.

AlleluiaMT 5:10

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Blessed are they who are persecuted for the sake of righteousness,
for theirs is the Kingdom of heaven.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMT 10:34—11:1

Jesus said to his Apostles:
"Do not think that I have come to bring peace upon the earth.
I have come to bring not peace but the sword.
For I have come to set
a man against his father,
a daughter against her mother,
and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law;
and one's enemies will be those of his household.

"Whoever loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me,
and whoever loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me;
and whoever does not take up his cross
and follow after me is not worthy of me.
Whoever finds his life will lose it,
and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.

"Whoever receives you receives me,
and whoever receives me receives the one who sent me.
Whoever receives a prophet because he is a prophet
will receive a prophet's reward,
and whoever receives a righteous man
because he is righteous
will receive a righteous man's reward.
And whoever gives only a cup of cold water
to one of these little ones to drink
because he is a disciple–
amen, I say to you, he will surely not lose his reward."

When Jesus finished giving these commands to his Twelve disciples,
he went away from that place to teach and to preach in their towns.

Saint July 15 : St. Bonaventure a Franciscan Doctor of the Church and Patron of Bowel Disorders

Doctor of the Church, Cardinal-Bishop of Albano, Minister General of the Friars Minor,
Born :  Bagnorea in the vicinity of Viterbo in 1221;
Died : Lyons, 15 July, 1274.
Nothing is known of Bonaventure's parents save their names: Giovanni di Fidanza and Maria Ritella. How his baptismal name of John came to be changed to that of Bonaventure is not clear. An attempt has been made to trace the latter name to the exclamation of St. Francis, O buona ventura, when Bonaventure was brought as an infant to him to be cured of a dangerous illness. This derivation is highly improbable; it seems based on a late fifteenth-century legend. Bonaventure himself tells us (Legenda S. Francisci Prolog.) that while yet a child he was preserved from death through the intercession of St. Francis, but there is no evidence that this cure took place during the lifetime of St. Francis or that the name Bonaventure originated in any prophetical words of St. Francis. It was certainly borne by others before the Seraphic Doctor. No details of Bonaventure's youth have been preserved. He entered the Order of Friars Minor in 1238 or 1243; the exact year is uncertain. Wadding and the Bollandists bold for the later date, but the earlier one is supported by Sbaradea, Bonelli, Panfilo da Magliano, and Jeiler, and appears more probable. It is certain that Bonaventure was sent from the Roman Province, to which he belonged, to complete his studies at the University of Paris under Alexander of Hales, the great founder of the Franciscan School. The latter died in 1246, according to the opinion generally received, though not yet definitely established, and Bonaventure seems to have become his pupil about 1242. Be this as it may, Bonaventure received in 1248 the "licentiate" which gave him the right to teach publicly as Magister regens, and he continued to lecture at the university with great success until 1256, when he was compelled to discontinue, owing to the then violent outburst of opposition to the Mendicant orders on the part of the secular professors at the university. The latter, jealous, as it seems, of the academic successes of the Dominicans and Franciscans, sought to exclude them from teaching publicly.
The smouldering elements of discord had been fanned into a flame in 1256, when Guillaume de Saint-Amour published a work entitled "The Perils of the Last Times", in which he attacked the Friars with great bitterness. It was in connexion with this dispute that Bonaventure wrote his treatise, "De paupertate Christi". It was not, however, Bonaventure, as some have erroneously stated, but Blessed John of Parma, who appeared before Alexander IV at Anagni to defend the Franciscans against their adversary. The Holy See having, as is well known, re-established the Mendicants in all their privileges, and Saint-Amour's book having been formally condemned, the degree of Doctor was solemnly bestowed on St. Bonaventure and St. Thomas Aquinas at the university, 23 October, 1257. In the meantime Bonaventure, though not yet thirty-six years old, had on 2 February, 1257, been elected Minister General of the Friars Minor — an office of peculiar difficulty, owing to the fact that the order was distracted by internal dissensions between the two factions among the Friars designated respectively the Spirituales and the Relaxati. The former insisted upon the literal observance of the original Rule, especially in regard to poverty, while the latter wished to introduce innovations and mitigations. This lamentable controversy had moreover been aggravated by the enthusiasm with which many of the "Spiritual" Friars had adopted the doctrines connected with the name of Abbot Joachim of Floris and set forth in the so-called "Evangelium aeternum".
The introduction to this pernicious book, which proclaimed the approaching dispensation of the Spirit that was to replace the Law of Christ, was falsely attributed to Bl. John of Parma, who in 1267 had retired from the government of the order in favour of Bonaventure. The new general lost no time in striking vigorously at both extremes within the order. On the one hand, he proceeded against several of the Joachimite "Spirituals" as heretics before an ecclesiastical tribunal at Città della Pieve; two of their leaders were condemned to perpetual imprisonment, and John of Parma was only saved from a like fate through the personal intervention of Cardinal Ottoboni, afterwards Adrian V.
On the other hand, Bonaventure had, in an encyclical letter issued immediately after his election, outlined a programme for the reformation of the Relaxati. These reforms he sought to enforce three years later at the General Chapter of Narbonne when the constitutions of the order which he had revised were promulgated anew. These so-called "Constitutiones Narbonenses" are distributed under twelve heads, corresponding to the twelve chapters of the Rule, of which they form an enlightened and prudent exposition, and are of capital importance in the history of Franciscan legislation. The chapter which issued this code of laws requested Bonaventure to write a "legend" or life of St. Francis which should supersede those then in circulation. This was in 1260.
Three years later Bonaventure, having in the meantime visited a great part of the order, and having assisted at the dedication of the chapel on La Verna and at the translation of the remains of St. Clare and of St. Anthony, convoked a general chapter of the order of Pisa at which his newly composed life of St. Francis was officially approved as the standard biography of the saint to the exclusion of all others. At this chapter of 1263, Bonaventure fixed the limits of the different provinces of the order and, among other ordinances, prescribed that at nightfall a bell should be rung in honour of the Annunciation, a pious practice from which the Angelus seems to have originated. There are no grounds, however, for the assertion that Bonaventure in this chapter prescribed the celebration of the feast of the Immaculate Conception in the order. In 1264, at the earnest request of Cardinal Cajetan, Bonaventure consented to resume the direction of the Poor Clares which the Chapter of Pisa had entirely renounced the year before. He required the Clares, however, to acknowledge occasionally in writing that the favours tendered them by the Friars were voluntary acts of charity not arising from any obligation whatsoever. It is said that Pope Urban IV acted at Bonaventure's suggestion in attempting to establish uniformity of observance throughout all the monasteries of Clares. About this time (1264) Bonaventure founded at Rome the Society of the Gonfalone in honour of the Blessed Virgin which, if not the first confraternity instituted in the Church, as some have claimed, was certainly one of the earliest.
 In 1265 Clement IV, by a Bull dated 23 November, nominated Bonaventure to the vacant Archbishopric of York, but the saint, in keeping with his singular humility, steadfastly refused this honour and the pope yielded. In 1266 Bonaventure convened a general chapter in Paris at which, besides other enactments, it was decreed that all the "legends" of St. Francis written before that of Bonaventure should be forthwith destroyed, just as the Chapter of Narbonne had in 1260 ordered the destruction of all constitutions before those then enacted. This decree has excited much hostile criticism. Some would fain see in it a deliberate attempt on Bonaventure's part to close the primitive sources of Franciscan history, to suppress the real Francis, and substitute a counterfeit in his stead. Others, however, regard the decree in question as a purely liturgical ordinance intended to secure uniformity in the choir "legends". Between these two conflicting opinions the truth seems to be that this edict was nothing more than another heroic attempt to wipe out the old quarrels and start afresh. One cannot but regret the circumstances of this decree, but when it is recalled that the appeal of the contending parties was ever to the words and actions of St. Francis as recorded in the earlier "legends", it would be unjust to accuse the chapter of "literary vandalism" in seeking to proscribe the latter. We have no details of Bonaventure's life between 1266 and 1269.
In the latter year he convoked his fourth general chapter at Assisi, in which it was enacted that a Mass be sung every Saturday throughout the order in honour of the Blessed Virgin, not, however, in honour of her Immaculate Conception as Wadding among others has erroneously stated. It was probably soon after this chapter that Bonaventure composed his "Apologia pauperum", in which he silences Gerard of Abbeville who by means of an anonymous libel had revived the old university feud against the Friars. Two years later, Bonaventure was mainly instrumental in reconciling the differences among the cardinals assembled at Viterbo to elect a successor to Clement IV, who had died nearly three years before; it was on Bonaventure's advice that, 1 September, 1271, they unanimously chose Theobald Visconti of Piacenza who took the title of Gregory X. That the cardinals seriously authorized Bonaventure to nominate himself, as some writers aver, is most improbable. Nor is there any truth in the popular story that Bonaventure on arriving at Viterbo advised the citizens to lock up the cardinals with a view to hastening the election. In 1272 Bonaventure for the second time convened a general chapter at Pisa in which, apart from general enactments to further regular observances new decrees were issued respecting the direction of the Poor Clares, and a solemn anniversary was instituted on 25 August in memory of St. Louis. This was the first step towards the canonization of the holy king, who had been a special friend of Bonaventure, and at whose request Bonaventure composed his "Office of the Passion". On 23 June, 1273, Bonaventure, much against his will, was created Cardinal-Bishop of Albano, by Gregory X. It is said that the pope's envoys who brought him the cardinal's hat found the saint washing dishes outside a convent near Florence and were requested by him to hang it on a tree nearby until his hands were free to take it. Bonaventure continued to govern the Order of Friars Minor until 20 May, 1274, when at the General Chapter of Lyons, Jerome of Ascoli, afterwards Nicholas IV, was elected to succeed him. Meanwhile Bonaventure had been charged by Gregory X to prepare the questions to be discussed at the Fourteenth Oecumenical Council, which opened at Lyons 7 May, 1274. The pope himself presided at the council, but he confided the direction of its deliberations to Bonaventure, especially charging him to confer with the Greeks on the points relating to the abjuration of their schism. It was largely due to Bonaventure's efforts and to those of the Friars whom he had sent to Constantinople, that the Greeks accepted the union effected 6 July, 1274. Bonaventure twice addressed the assembled Fathers, on 18 May, during a session of the Council, when he preached on Baruch 5:5, and on 29 June, during pontifical Mass celebrated by the pope. While the council was still in session, Bonaventure died, Sunday, 15 July, 1274. The exact cause of his death is unknown, but if we may credit the chronicle of Peregrinus of Bologna, Bonaventure's secretary, which has recently (1905) been recovered and edited, the saint was poisoned. He was buried on the evening following his death in the church of the Friars Minor at Lyons, being honoured with a splendid funeral which was attended by the pope, the King of Aragon, the cardinals, and the other members of the council. The funeral oration was delivered by Pietro di Tarantasia, O.P., Cardinal-Bishop of Ostia, afterwards Innocent V, and on the following day during the fifth session of the council, Gregory X spoke of the irreparable loss the Church had sustained by the death of Bonaventure, and commanded all prelates and priests throughout the whole world to celebrate Mass for the repose of his soul. Text Shortened from the Catholic Encyclopedia