Friday, October 25, 2019

Free Catholic Movie : "Karol : A Man who became Pope" - Life of St. John Paul II - #JP2

"Karol: A Man Who Became Pope" (2005) "Karol, un uomo diventato Papa" (original title) TV Movie - 186 min - Biography | Drama - 15 August 2005 (USA) The life of the Pope John-Paul II, from his youth as a writer, actor, and athlete in war-torn occupied Poland to his election as Pope at the age of 58. Director: Giacomo Battiato Writers: Giacomo Battiato (screenplay), Gianfranco Svidercoschi (book) Stars: Piotr Adamczyk, Malgorzata Bela, Ken Duken
Free Movies - Breaking News LIKE Us On Facebook http://fb.com/catholicnewsworld

#BreakingNews Pope Francis announces that Statues were Retrieved and Asks for Forgiveness from Natives


Pope Francis announces retrieval of indigenous statues (VaticanNews.va)
The Holy See Press Office has provided a transcription of Pope Francis’s remarks concerning several indigenous statues, stolen earlier this week and thrown into the Tiber River. The Holy Father spoke off-the-cuff following the liturgical prayer that opened the afternoon session of the 15th General Congregation of the Synod for the Amazon.
Pope Francis' words:

Good afternoon. I want to say a word about the statues of the pachamama (N.B. "Vatican spokesman Matteo Bruni said the pope used the word as a means to identify the statues because that is the way they have become known in the Italian media and not as a reference to the goddess.")
that were taken from the church of the Transpontina – which were there without idolatrous intentions – and were thrown into the Tiber.
First of all, this happened in Rome, and, as Bishop of the Diocese, I ask pardon of the persons who were offended by this act.

Then, I want to communicate to you that the statues which created such attention in the media, were retrieved from the Tiber. The statues were not damaged.

The Commander of the Carabinieri desires that you should be informed of this recovery before the news is made public. At the moment, the news is confidential, and the statues are being kept in the Italian Carabinieri Commander's office.

The Commander of the Carabinieri has expressed his desire to follow up on any indications that you would like to give concerning the manner of publication of the news, and any other initiative you may want to take in this regard: for example, the Commander said, “the exhibition of the statues during the Holy Mass for the closing of the Synod”. We’ll see.

I have delegated the Secretary of State to respond to this.

This is a bit of good news. Thank you.
Full Text Source: VaticanNews.va

Pope Francis says there is a constant struggle between Grace and Sin and thus Invites us to Examine ourselves at the end of the Day - Homily


Pope at Mass: in the struggle between good and evil choose salvation
Pope Francis says that in all of us there is a constant struggle between grace and sin. He invites Christians to examine themselves at the end of the day and find out whether their decisions are “from the Lord” or are dictated “by the devil”.
By Robin Gomes

Pope Francis is urging Christians to ask the Lord for the light to know well what is happening inside us.  In his homily at Mass, Friday morning, at the Vatican’s Casa Santa Marta, he reflected on the First Reading where St. Paul speaks to the Romans about the continuous inner struggle inside him between the desire to do good and not being able to do it.

A struggle in all of us
Some might think that by carrying out the “evil he does not want” St. Paul might be in hell or defeated. Yet, the Pope says, he is a saint because even saints experience this war within themselves, between the good that the Holy Spirit inspires and the bad of the evil spirit, It is “a law for all”, “an everyday war”.

Anyone who says he does not have this struggle within and feels blessed and at peace, the Pope tells him or her: “You're not blessed.  You’re someone who doesn't understand what’s happening”.

In this daily struggle, the Pope says, we win today, tomorrow and the day after until the end.   The martyrs “had to fight to the end to maintain their faith”.   It’s the same for the saints, like Therese of the Child Jesus, for whom “the hardest struggle was the final moment”, on her deathbed, because she felt that “the bad spirit” wanted to snatch her from the Lord.

Stop to think
In daily life, the Pope says, there are “extraordinary moments of struggle” as well as “ordinary moments”.  That is why in the day’s Gospel, Jesus tells the crowd: “You know how to interpret the appearance of the earth and the sky; why do you not know how to interpret the present time?”

According to the Pope, we Christians are often busy in many things, including good things, but he wonders whether we ask what is going on inside and who leads us to them.  “Our life,” the Pope says, “is like life in the street”.  “When we go down the road, we just look at the things that interest us; others, we don't care.”

Grace and sin
Pope Francis says there is always the struggle between grace and sin, between the Lord who wants to save and pull us out of this temptation and the bad spirit that always throws us down in order to win over.   He thus urges Christians to ask themselves whether they walk down the street like one who comes and goes without realizing what is happening and to find out whether their decisions come “from the Lord” or are dictated by our “selfishness”, “by the devil”.

Before the end of the day, the Pope says, one needs to stop for two to three minutes to examine oneself whether anything important has happened that day.  One can find a bit of hatred,  speaking ill of others as well as an act of charity. To understand what goes on inside, one should ask who inspired these acts.  At times, the Pope says, with our gossip mentality, we know what happens in the neighbourhood and in the neighbours' house but we don't know what happens inside us.
Full Text Source: VaticanNews.va

Saint October 25 : St. Antônio de Sant’Anna Galvão (1739-1822) a Franciscan Friar and Founder

St. Antônio de Sant’Anna Galvão (1739-1822). Born in Guarantingueta near São Paulo (Brazil), Antônio attended the Jesuit seminary in Belem but later decided to become a Franciscan friar. Invested in 1760, he made final profession the following year and was ordained in 1762. In São Paulo, he served as preacher, confessor and porter. Within a few years he was appointed confessor to the Recollects of St. Teresa, a group of nuns in that city. He and Sister Helena Maria of the Holy Spirit founded a new community of sisters under the patronage of Our Lady of the Conception of Divine Providence. Sister Helena Maria’s premature death the next year left Father Antônio responsible for the new congregation, especially for building a convent and church adequate for their growing numbers. He served as novice master for the friars in Macacu and as guardian of St. Francis Friary in São Paulo. He founded St. Clare Friary in Sorocaba. With the permission of his provincial and the bishop, he spent his last days at the Recolhimento de Nossa Senhora da Luz, the convent of the sisters’ congregation he had helped establish. He was beatified in Rome on October 25, 1998, and canonized in 2007. Edited from WYDCentral - Image Share Google Images

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Friday October 25, 2019 - #Eucharist


Friday of the Twenty-ninth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 477

Reading 1ROM 7:18-25A

Brothers and sisters:
I know that good does not dwell in me, that is, in my flesh.
The willing is ready at hand, but doing the good is not.
For I do not do the good I want,
but I do the evil I do not want.
Now if I do what I do not want, it is no longer I who do it,
but sin that dwells in me.
So, then, I discover the principle
that when I want to do right, evil is at hand.
For I take delight in the law of God, in my inner self,
but I see in my members another principle
at war with the law of my mind,
taking me captive to the law of sin that dwells in my members.
Miserable one that I am!
Who will deliver me from this mortal body?
Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Responsorial PsalmPS 119:66, 68, 76, 77, 93, 94

R.(68b) Lord, teach me your statutes.
Teach me wisdom and knowledge,
for in your commands I trust.
R. Lord, teach me your statutes.
You are good and bountiful;
teach me your statutes.
R. Lord, teach me your statutes.
Let your kindness comfort me
according to your promise to your servants.
R. Lord, teach me your statutes.
Let your compassion come to me that I may live,
for your law is my delight.
R. Lord, teach me your statutes.
Never will I forget your precepts,
for through them you give me life.
R. Lord, teach me your statutes.
I am yours; save me,
for I have sought your precepts.
R. Lord, teach me your statutes.

AlleluiaSEE MT 11:25

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Blessed are you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth;
you have revealed to little ones the mysteries of the Kingdom.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelLK 12:54-59

Jesus said to the crowds,
“When you see a cloud rising in the west
you say immediately that it is going to rain–and so it does;
and when you notice that the wind is blowing from the south
you say that it is going to be hot–and so it is.
You hypocrites!
You know how to interpret the appearance of the earth and the sky;
why do you not know how to interpret the present time?

“Why do you not judge for yourselves what is right?
If you are to go with your opponent before a magistrate,
make an effort to settle the matter on the way;
otherwise your opponent will turn you over to the judge,
and the judge hand you over to the constable,
and the constable throw you into prison.
I say to you, you will not be released
until you have paid the last penny.”

Saint October 25 : St. Gaudentius of Brescia, Italy : Bishop

St. Gaudentius

BISHOP
Feast: October 25
Information:
Feast Day:
October 25
Born:
Brescia, Italy
Died:
410

Bishop of Brescia from about 387 until about 410; he was the successor of the writer on heresies, St. Philastrius. At the time of that saint's death Gaudentius was making a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. The people of Brescia bound themselves by an oath that they would accept no other bishop than Gaudentius; and St. Ambrose and other neighbouring prelates, in consequence, obliged him to return, though against his will. The Eastern bishops also threatened to refuse him Communion if he did not obey. We possess the discourse which he made before St. Ambrose and other bishops on the occasion of his consecration, in which he excuses, on the plea of obedience, his youth and his presumption in speaking. He had brought back with him from the East many precious relics of St. John Baptist and of the Apostles, and especially of the Forty Martyrs of Sebaste, relics of whom he had received at Caesarea in Cappadocia from nieces of St. Basil. These and other relics from Milan and elsewhere he deposited in a basilica which he named Concilium Sanctorum. His sermon on its dedication is extant. From a letter of St. Chrysostom (Ep. clxxxiv) to Gaudentius it may be gathered that the two saints had met at Antioch. When St. Chrysostom had been condemned to exile and had appealed to Pope Innocent and the West in 405, Gaudentius warmly took his part. An embassy to the Eastern Emperor Arcadius from his brother Honorius and from the pope, bearing letters frorn both and from Italian bishops, consisted of Gaudentius and two other bishops. The envoys were seized at Athens and sent to Constantinople, being three days on a ship without food. They were not admitted into the city, but were shut up in a fortress called Athyra, on the coast of Thrace. Their credentials were seized by force, so that the thumb of one of the bishops was broken, and they were offered a large sum of money if they would communicate with Atticus, who had supplanted St. Chrysostom. They were consoled by God, and St. Paul appeared to a deacon amongst them. They were eventually put on board an unseaworthy vessel, and it was said that the captain had orders to wreck them. However, they arrived safe at Lampsacus, where they took ship for Italy, and arrived in twenty days at Otranto. Their own account of their four months' adventures has been preserved to us by Palladius (Dialogus, 4). St. Chrysostom wrote them several grateful letters.
We possess twenty-one genuine tractates by Gaudentius. The first ten are a series of Easter sermons, written down after delivery at the request of Benivolus, the chief of the Brescian nobility, who had been prevented by ill health from hearing them delivered. In the preface Gaudentius takes occasion to disown all unauthorized copies of his sermons published by shorthand writers. These pirated editions seem to have been known to Rufinus, who, in the dedication to St. Gaudentius of his translation of the pseudo-Clementine "Recognitions", praises the intellectual gifts of thne Bishop of Brescia, saying that even his extempore speaking is worthy of publication and of preservation by posterity. The style of Gaudentius is simple, and his matter is good. His body lies at Brescia in the Church of St. John Baptist, on the site of the Concilium Sanctorum. His figure is frequently seen in the altar-pieces of the great Brescian painters, Moretto, Savoldo, and Romanino. The best edition of his works is by Galeardi (Padua, 1720, and in P.L., XX). SOURCE http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/G/stgaudentius.asp

Saint October 25 : St. Boniface I : Pope

Pope Boniface I (Latin: Bonifatius I; died 4 September 422) was Pope from 28 December 418 to his death in 422. He was a contemporary of Saint Augustine of Hippo, who dedicated to him some of his works. On the day of the funeral for Pope Zosimus, which was held at San Lorenzo fuori le Mura, partisans of Eulalius occupied the Lateran. Later that day, he proceeded thither with a crowd consisting of deacons, laity and a few priests, and was elected bishop. The new Pope and his supporters remained at the church until Sunday, 29 December, for the formal ordination customarily took place on a Sunday. Meanwhile, on the Saturday after Eulalius had been elected, a majority of the priests of the church elected Boniface, who had previously been a councilor of Pope Innocent, and was also ordained on 29 December at the Church of Saint Marcellus in the Campus Martius. The Urban Prefect Aurelius Anicius Symmachus warned both parties to keep the peace, and wrote to the Emperor Honorius that Eulalius, who had been elected first and in due order, was in the right. The Emperor answered on 3 January 419, recognizing Eulalius as the rightful Bishop of Rome. Despite these official acts, violence broke out between the two groups, and Boniface was seized by the Prefect's police and taken to a lodging outside the walls where he was detained under the surveillance of the Prefect's agents.[2] Boniface's partisans did not let the matter rest there and sent a petition to Emperor Honorius alleging irregularities in the election of Eulalius. In response, the Emperor suspended his previous order and summoned both parties to appear for judgment before him and other Italian bishops on 8 February. The hearing deferred a decision to a synod which was scheduled to meet at Spoleto on 13 June, but commanded both Boniface and Eulalius to stay out of Rome. Since Easter was approaching, the bishop of Spoleto, an outside party, was asked to celebrate the rites of this important holy day in Rome.[3] Both the Empress Galla Placidia and her husband Constantius III favored Eulalius, who had been elected first. Stewart Oost observes that papal elections at the time were "still quite indefinite and both parties could thus with right claim proper election and consecration." Although Eulalius appeared to be destined to be confirmed to the post, by boldly entering Rome on 18 March—Easter Sunday that year fell on 30 March—and disobeying Imperial orders, he lost the support of the authorities. Symmachus sent his police to occupy the Lateran, where Eulalius had established himself, and escorted him to a house outside the walls of Rome. Bishop Achilleus of Spoleto celebrated the Mass in the Lateran. The proposed Council of Spoleto was canceled, and on 3 April 419, Emperor Honorius recognized Boniface as the rightful Pope.[4] Boniface continued the opposition to Pelagianism, persuaded Emperor Theodosius II to return Illyricum to Western jurisdiction, and defended the rights of the Holy See. Shared from Wikipedia