Sunday, March 1, 2020

Saint March 2 : St. Agnes of Prague a Princess, Abbess and Miracle Worker who was related to a Saint




Born:
1211, Prague
Died:
March 6, 1282, Prague
Canonized:
November 12, 1989 by Pope John Paul II
Born at Prague in the year 1200; died probably in 1281. She was the daughter of Ottocar, King of Bohemia and Constance of Hungary, a relative of St. Elizabeth. At an early age she was sent to the monastery of Treinitz, where at the hands of the Cistercian religious she received the education that became her rank. She was betrothed to Frederick II, Emperor of Germany; but when the time arrived for the solemnization of the marriage, it was impossible to persuade her to abandon the resolution she had made of consecrating herself to the service of God in the sanctuary of the cloister. The Emperor Frederick was incensed at the unsuccessful issue of his matrimonial venture, but, on learning that St. Agnes had left him to become the spouse of Christ, he is said to have remarked: "If she had left me for a mortal man, I would have taken vengeance with the sword, but I cannot take offence because in preference to me she has chosen the King of Heaven." The servant of God entered the Order of St. Clare in the monastery of St. Saviour at Prague, which she herself had erected. She was elected abbess of the monastery, and became in this office a model of Christian virtue and religious observance for all. God favoured her with the gift of miracles, and she predicted the victory of her brother Wenceslaus over the Duke of Austria. The exact year of her death is not certain; 1281 is the most probable date.

(Taken from Catholic Encyclopedia)
Prayer:
Dear St. Agnes, intercede for us, obtain for us we pray, the grace to prefer the treasures of the next world over the passing pleasures of this world. Amen.

Due to Sickness, Pope Francis will not travel to Lenten Retreat but follow the exercises from the Vatican


Pope to follow Spiritual Exercises from the Vatican
Pope Francis says a cold is keeping him indoors; therefore he will follow the annual Spiritual Exercises from the Vatican.
By Linda Bordoni

Asking the faithful gathered in St. Peter’s Square to remember the Spiritual Exercises of the Roman Curia in their prayers, Pope Francis revealed that a cold will be keeping him indoors, therefore, he will not be going to Ariccia for the annual retreat.
The Pope had been scheduled to travel to the town in the Alban Hills outside Rome this afternoon to participate in a week-long cycle of meditations.
“I will be following from here,” he said, adding that although he will not physically participate in the retreat, he will spiritually join the Curia and all those who are experiencing moments of prayer.
The preacher who will be leading the retreat in the town of Ariccia this year is Jesuit Father Pietro Bovati, Secretary of the Pontifical Biblical Commission.

Papal retreat to focus on listening to God as prophetic experience
As always, the retreat takes place at Casa Gesù Divin Maestro (the Divine Master House) in the little town not far from Rome.
The theme chosen for this year’s meditations is “The bush was on fire (Ex 3:2) – The encounter between God and man in light of the book of Exodus, the Gospel of Matthew, and the prayer of the Psalms”.
Why Ariccia?
Unlike the Popes who preceded him, in 2014 Pope Francis chose a place outside the Vatican for the Spiritual Exercises.

His decision was explained by Father Ciro Benedettini, the then deputy director of the Holy See Press Office who emphasized that it is common practice for Jesuits to perform the Exercises outside the place where they live.

Full Text Source: VaticanNews.va

Pope Francis says "... in this time of Lent to be vigilant in the face of temptations...to follow Jesus in the fight against evil..." Full Text


ANGELUS

St. Peter's Square
Sunday, March 1, 2020

Dear brothers and sisters, good morning!

On this first Sunday of Lent, the Gospel (cf Mt 4: 1-11) tells that Jesus, after being baptized in the Jordan River, "was led by the Spirit into the desert, to be tempted by the devil" (v. 1). He prepares to begin his mission as announcer of the Kingdom of heaven and, as already Moses and Elijah (cf. Ex 24,18; 1 Kings 19,8), in the Old Testament, he does it with a fast of forty days. Enter Lent.

At the end of this fasting period, the tempter, the devil, breaks in and tries three times to put Jesus in difficulty. The first temptation is inspired by the fact that Jesus is hungry; the devil suggests to him: "If you are the Son of God, say that these stones become bread" (v. 3). A challenge. But Jesus' answer is clear: "It is written:" Man will not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God "" (4: 4). He refers to Moses when he reminds the people of the long journey made in the desert, in which he learned that his life depends on the Word of God (cf. Dt 8,3).

Then the devil makes a second attempt, (vv. 5-6) becomes more cunning, also citing Holy Scripture. The strategy is clear: if you have so much confidence in the power of God, then experience it, in fact the Scripture itself states that you will be helped by the angels (v. 6). But even in this case Jesus does not allow himself to be confused, because whoever believes knows that God does not test him, but entrusts himself to his goodness. Therefore to the words of the Bible, instrumentally interpreted by satan, Jesus replies with another quote: "It is also written:" You will not test the Lord your God "" (v. 7).

Finally, the third attempt (vv. 8-9) reveals the true thought of the devil: since the coming of the Kingdom of heaven marks the beginning of his defeat, the evil one would like to divert Jesus from carrying out his mission, offering him a perspective of political messianism. But Jesus rejects the idolatry of human power and glory and, in the end, drives away the tempter by saying: "Go away, Satan! It is written in fact: "The Lord, your God, you will worship: you will only worship him" "(v. 10). And at this point, near Jesus, faithful to the handing over of the Father, angels came to serve him (cf. v. 11).

This teaches us one thing: Jesus does not dialogue with the devil. Jesus responds to the devil with the Word of God, not with his word. In temptation many times we begin to dialogue with temptation, to dialogue with the devil: "Yes, but I can do this ..., then I confess, then this, that other ...". Never talk to the devil. Jesus does two things with the devil: he chases him away or, as in this case, he answers with the Word of God. Be careful: never dialogue with temptation, never dialogue with the devil.

Even today Satan breaks into people's lives to tempt them with his tempting proposals; mixes his with the many voices that try to tame the conscience. Messages come from many quarters inviting "to be tempted" to experience the thrill of transgression. The experience of Jesus teaches us that temptation is the attempt to take alternative ways to those of God: "But, do this, there is no problem, then God forgives! But take a day of joy ... "-" But it's a sin! " - "No, it's nothing." Alternative ways, ways that give us the feeling of self-sufficiency, of the enjoyment of life as an end in itself. But all this is illusory: soon we realize that the more we distance ourselves from God, the more we feel defenseless and helpless in the face of the great problems of existence.

May the Virgin Mary, the Mother of Him who crushed the head of the serpent, help us in this time of Lent to be vigilant in the face of temptations, not to submit to any idol of this world, to follow Jesus in the fight against evil; and we too will winners like Jesus.

After the Angelus

Dear brothers and sisters!

I greet all of you, faithful from Rome and pilgrims from Italy and various countries.

In particular, I greet the young people of Formentera, the faithful of Ostuni and those of the parish of San Pio da Pietrelcina in Rome.

I wish everyone that the Lenten journey, which has just begun, be rich in fruits of the Spirit and rich in works of good.

I am a little saddened by the news that many displaced people arrive, many men, women, children driven away due to the war, many migrants who seek refuge in the world, and help. These days, it has become very strong. Let us pray for them.

I also ask you for a remembrance in the prayer for the Spiritual Exercises of the Roman Curia, which will begin this evening in Ariccia. Unfortunately, the cold forces me not to participate this year: I will follow the meditations from here. I spiritually join the Curia and all the people who are experiencing moments of prayer, doing the Spiritual Exercises at home.
Have a good Sunday and a good lunch!

Sunday Mass Online : Sun. March 1, 2020 - #Eucharist in Lent 1st Sun. - Readings + Video


First Sunday of Lent
Lectionary: 22 Reading 1GN 2:7-9; 3:1-7
The LORD God formed man out of the clay of the ground
and blew into his nostrils the breath of life,
and so man became a living being.
Then the LORD God planted a garden in Eden, in the east,
and placed there the man whom he had formed.
Out of the ground the LORD God made various trees grow
that were delightful to look at and good for food,
with the tree of life in the middle of the garden
and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.
Now the serpent was the most cunning of all the animals
that the LORD God had made.
The serpent asked the woman,
“Did God really tell you not to eat
from any of the trees in the garden?”
The woman answered the serpent:
“We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden;
it is only about the fruit of the tree
in the middle of the garden that God said,
‘You shall not eat it or even touch it, lest you die.’”
But the serpent said to the woman:
“You certainly will not die!
No, God knows well that the moment you eat of it
your eyes will be opened and you will be like gods
who know what is good and what is evil.”
The woman saw that the tree was good for food,
pleasing to the eyes, and desirable for gaining wisdom.
So she took some of its fruit and ate it;
and she also gave some to her husband, who was with her,
and he ate it.
Then the eyes of both of them were opened,
and they realized that they were naked;
so they sewed fig leaves together
and made loincloths for themselves.

Responsorial PsalmPS 51:3-4, 5-6, 12-13, 17

R. (cf. 3a) Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.
Have mercy on me, O God, in your goodness;
in the greatness of your compassion wipe out my offense.
Thoroughly wash me from my guilt
and of my sin cleanse me.
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.
For I acknowledge my offense,
and my sin is before me always:
“Against you only have I sinned,
and done what is evil in your sight.”
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.
A clean heart create for me, O God,
and a steadfast spirit renew within me.
Cast me not out from your presence,
and your Holy Spirit take not from me.
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.
Give me back the joy of your salvation,
and a willing spirit sustain in me.
O Lord, open my lips,
and my mouth shall proclaim your praise.
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.

Reading 2ROM 5:12-19 OR 5:12, 17-19

Brothers and sisters:
Through one man sin entered the world,
and through sin, death,
and thus death came to all men, inasmuch as all sinned—
for up to the time of the law, sin was in the world,
though sin is not accounted when there is no law.
But death reigned from Adam to Moses,
even over those who did not sin
after the pattern of the trespass of Adam,
who is the type of the one who was to come.
But the gift is not like the transgression.
For if by the transgression of the one, the many died,
how much more did the grace of God
and the gracious gift of the one man Jesus Christ
overflow for the many.
And the gift is not like the result of the one who sinned.
For after one sin there was the judgment that brought condemnation;
but the gift, after many transgressions, brought acquittal.
For if, by the transgression of the one,
death came to reign through that one,
how much more will those who receive the abundance of grace
and of the gift of justification
come to reign in life through the one Jesus Christ.
In conclusion, just as through one transgression
condemnation came upon all,
so, through one righteous act,
acquittal and life came to all.
For just as through the disobedience of the one man
the many were made sinners,
so, through the obedience of the one,
the many will be made righteous.
or
Brothers and sisters:
Through one man sin entered the world,
and through sin, death,
and thus death came to all men, inasmuch as all sinned.
For if, by the transgression of the one,
death came to reign through that one,
how much more will those who receive the abundance of grace
and of the gift of justification
come to reign in life through the one Jesus Christ.
In conclusion, just as through one transgression
condemnation came upon all,
so, through one righteous act,
acquittal and life came to all.
For just as through the disobedience of the one man
the many were made sinners,
so, through the obedience of the one,
the many will be made righteous.

Verse Before The GospelMT 4:4B

One does not live on bread alone,
but on every word that comes forth from the mouth of God.

GospelMT 4:1-11

At that time Jesus was led by the Spirit into the desert
to be tempted by the devil.
He fasted for forty days and forty nights,
and afterwards he was hungry.
The tempter approached and said to him,
“If you are the Son of God,
command that these stones become loaves of bread.”
He said in reply,
“It is written:
One does not live on bread alone,
but on every word that comes forth
from the mouth of God.”
Then the devil took him to the holy city,
and made him stand on the parapet of the temple,
and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down.
For it is written:
He will command his angels concerning you
and with their hands they will support you,
lest you dash your foot against a stone.”

Jesus answered him,
“Again it is written,
You shall not put the Lord, your God, to the test.”
Then the devil took him up to a very high mountain,
and showed him all the kingdoms of the world in their magnificence,
and he said to him, "All these I shall give to you,
if you will prostrate yourself and worship me.”
At this, Jesus said to him,
“Get away, Satan!
It is written:
The Lord, your God, shall you worship
and him alone shall you serve.”
Then the devil left him and, behold,
angels came and ministered to him.

Saint March 1 : St. Suitbert an Apostle to the Frisians and Patron of Angina Sufferers; Throat diseases



St. Suitbert APOSTLE OF THE FRISIANS
Born:
647

Died:
1 March 713 near Düsseldorf, Germany
Patron of:
angina sufferers; Germany; throat diseases

Apostle of the Frisians, b. in England in the seventh century; d. at Suitberts-Insel, now Kaiserswerth, near Dusseldorf, 1 March, 713. He studied in Ireland, at Rathmelsigi, Connacht, along with St. Egbert. The latter, filled with zeal for the conversion of the Germans, had sent St. Wihtberht, or Wigbert, to evangelize the Frisians, but owing to the opposition of the pagan ruler, Rathbod, Wihtberht was unsuccessful and returned to England. Egbert then sent St. Willibrord and his twelve companions, among whom was St. Suitbert. They landed near the mouth of the Rhine and journeyed to Utrecht, which became their headquarters. The new missionaries worked with great success under the protection of Pepin of Heristal, who, having recently conquered a portion of Frisia, compelled Rathbod to cease harassing the Christians. Suitbert laboured chiefly in North Brabant, Guelderland, and Cleves. After some years he went back to England, and in 693 was consecrated in Mercia as a missionary bishop by St. Wilfrid of York. He returned to Frisia and fixed his see at Wijkbij Duurstede on a branch of the Rhine. A little later, entrusting his flock of converts to St. Willibrord, he proceeded north of the Rhine and the Lippe, among the Bructeri, or Boructuari, in the district of Berg, Westphalia. This mission bore great fruit at first, but was eventually a failure owing to the inroads of the pagan Saxons; when the latter had conquered the territory, Suitbert withdrew to a small island in the Rhine, six miles from Dusseldorf, granted to him by Pepin of Heristal, where he built a monastery and ended his days in peace. His relics were rediscovered in 1626 at Kaiserwerth and are still venerated there. St. Suitbert of Kaiserwerdt is to be distinguished from a holy abbot, Suitbert, who lived in a monastery near the River Dacore, Cumberland, England, about forty years later, and is mentioned by Venerable Bede.

(Taken From Catholic Encyclopedia)