Saturday, March 21, 2020

Sunday Mass Online : Sunday, March 22, 2020 - Readings and Video - #Eucharist on 4th Lent - Laetare









Fourth Sunday of Lent Lectionary: 31
Reading 11 SM 16:1B, 6-7, 10-13A
The LORD said to Samuel:
“Fill your horn with oil, and be on your way.
I am sending you to Jesse of Bethlehem,
for I have chosen my king from among his sons.”

As Jesse and his sons came to the sacrifice,
Samuel looked at Eliab and thought,
“Surely the LORD’s anointed is here before him.”
But the LORD said to Samuel:
“Do not judge from his appearance or from his lofty stature,
because I have rejected him.
Not as man sees does God see,
because man sees the appearance
but the LORD looks into the heart.”
In the same way Jesse presented seven sons before Samuel,
but Samuel said to Jesse,
“The LORD has not chosen any one of these.”
Then Samuel asked Jesse,
“Are these all the sons you have?”
Jesse replied,
“There is still the youngest, who is tending the sheep.”
Samuel said to Jesse,
“Send for him;
we will not begin the sacrificial banquet until he arrives here.”
Jesse sent and had the young man brought to them.
He was ruddy, a youth handsome to behold
and making a splendid appearance.
The LORD said,
“There—anoint him, for this is the one!”
Then Samuel, with the horn of oil in hand,
anointed David in the presence of his brothers;
and from that day on, the spirit of the LORD rushed upon David.

Responsorial PsalmPS 23: 1-3A, 3B-4, 5, 6.
R. (1)  The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want.
beside restful waters he leads me;
he refreshes my soul.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
He guides me in right paths
for his name’s sake.
Even though I walk in the dark valley
I fear no evil; for you are at my side
With your rod and your staff
that give me courage.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
You spread the table before me
in the sight of my foes;
you anoint my head with oil;
my cup overflows.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
Only goodness and kindness follow me
all the days of my life;
and I shall dwell in the house of the LORD
for years to come.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.

Reading 2EPH 5:8-14
Brothers and sisters:
You were once darkness,
but now you are light in the Lord.
Live as children of light,
for light produces every kind of goodness
and righteousness and truth.
Try to learn what is pleasing to the Lord.
Take no part in the fruitless works of darkness;
rather expose them, for it is shameful even to mention
the things done by them in secret;
but everything exposed by the light becomes visible,
for everything that becomes visible is light.
Therefore, it says:

“Awake, O sleeper,
and arise from the dead,
and Christ will give you light.”

Verse Before The GospelJN 8:12
I am the light of the world, says the Lord;
whoever follows me will have the light of life.

GospelJN 9:1-41
As Jesus passed by he saw a man blind from birth.
His disciples asked him,
“Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents,
that he was born blind?”
Jesus answered,
“Neither he nor his parents sinned;
it is so that the works of God might be made visible through him.
We have to do the works of the one who sent me while it is day.
Night is coming when no one can work.
While I am in the world, I am the light of the world.”
When he had said this, he spat on the ground
and made clay with the saliva,
and smeared the clay on his eyes,
and said to him,
“Go wash in the Pool of Siloam” —which means Sent—.
So he went and washed, and came back able to see.

His neighbors and those who had seen him earlier as a beggar said,
“Isn’t this the one who used to sit and beg?”
Some said, “It is, “
but others said, “No, he just looks like him.”
He said, “I am.”
So they said to him, “How were your eyes opened?”
He replied,
“The man called Jesus made clay and anointed my eyes
and told me, ‘Go to Siloam and wash.’
So I went there and washed and was able to see.”
And they said to him, “Where is he?”

He said, “I don’t know.”

They brought the one who was once blind to the Pharisees.
Now Jesus had made clay and opened his eyes on a sabbath.
So then the Pharisees also asked him how he was able to see.
He said to them,
“He put clay on my eyes, and I washed, and now I can see.”
So some of the Pharisees said,
“This man is not from God,
because he does not keep the sabbath.”
But others said,
“How can a sinful man do such signs?”
And there was a division among them.
So they said to the blind man again,
“What do you have to say about him,
since he opened your eyes?”
He said, “He is a prophet.”

Now the Jews did not believe
that he had been blind and gained his sight
until they summoned the parents of the one who had gained his sight.
They asked them,
“Is this your son, who you say was born blind?
How does he now see?”
His parents answered and said,
“We know that this is our son and that he was born blind.
We do not know how he sees now,
nor do we know who opened his eyes.
Ask him, he is of age;
he can speak for himself.”
His parents said this because they were afraid
of the Jews, for the Jews had already agreed
that if anyone acknowledged him as the Christ,
he would be expelled from the synagogue.
For this reason his parents said,
“He is of age; question him.”

So a second time they called the man who had been blind
and said to him, “Give God the praise!
We know that this man is a sinner.”
He replied,
“If he is a sinner, I do not know.
One thing I do know is that I was blind and now I see.”
So they said to him,
“What did he do to you?
How did he open your eyes?”
He answered them,
“I told you already and you did not listen.
Why do you want to hear it again?

Do you want to become his disciples, too?”
They ridiculed him and said,
“You are that man’s disciple;
we are disciples of Moses!
We know that God spoke to Moses,
but we do not know where this one is from.”
The man answered and said to them,
“This is what is so amazing,
that you do not know where he is from, yet he opened my eyes.
We know that God does not listen to sinners,
but if one is devout and does his will, he listens to him.
It is unheard of that anyone ever opened the eyes of a person born blind.
If this man were not from God,
he would not be able to do anything.”
They answered and said to him,
“You were born totally in sin,
and are you trying to teach us?”
Then they threw him out.

When Jesus heard that they had thrown him out,
he found him and said, "Do you believe in the Son of Man?”
He answered and said,
“Who is he, sir, that I may believe in him?”
Jesus said to him,
“You have seen him,
the one speaking with you is he.”
He said,
“I do believe, Lord,” and he worshiped him.
Then Jesus said,
“I came into this world for judgment,
so that those who do not see might see,
and those who do see might become blind.”

Some of the Pharisees who were with him heard this
and said to him, “Surely we are not also blind, are we?”
Jesus said to them,
“If you were blind, you would have no sin;
but now you are saying, ‘We see,’ so your sin remains.

or
Jn 9:1, 6-9, 13-17, 34-38


As Jesus passed by he saw a man blind from birth.
He spat on the ground and made clay with the saliva,
and smeared the clay on his eyes,
and said to him,
“Go wash in the Pool of Siloam” — which means Sent —.
So he went and washed, and came back able to see.

His neighbors and those who had seen him earlier as a beggar said,
“Isn’t this the one who used to sit and beg?”
Some said, “It is, “
but others said, “No, he just looks like him.”
He said, “I am.”

They brought the one who was once blind to the Pharisees.
Now Jesus had made clay and opened his eyes on a sabbath.
So then the Pharisees also asked him how he was able to see.
He said to them,
“He put clay on my eyes, and I washed, and now I can see.”
So some of the Pharisees said,
“This man is not from God,
because he does not keep the sabbath.”
But others said,
“How can a sinful man do such signs?”
And there was a division among them.
So they said to the blind man again,
“What do you have to say about him,
since he opened your eyes?”
He said, “He is a prophet.”

They answered and said to him,
“You were born totally in sin,
and are you trying to teach us?”
Then they threw him out.

When Jesus heard that they had thrown him out,
he found him and said, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?”
He answered and said,
“Who is he, sir, that I may believe in him?”
Jesus said to him,
“You have seen him, and
the one speaking with you is he.”
He said,
“I do believe, Lord,” and he worshiped him.
</div>

#BreakingNews RIP to over 30 Priests who have Died amid Coronavirus in Italy - Many while Ministering to the Sick




































Latest Death toll of the Coronavirus in Italy among priests with one positively infected bishop, another in quarantine.
The victims of which news has come are from the dioceses of Piacenza, Trento, Bolzano, Brescia, Bergamo and Ariano Irpino. The sick bishop is Olivero di Pinerolo, in Palletti is in isolation, from La Spezia.

A positive bishop has been hospitalized in isolation and another bishop is in self-imposed quarantine. The dead priests are from the dioceses of Piacenza-Bobbio and Brescia (2), Trento, Bolzano-Bressanone and Ariano Irpino (1). Bergamo has the most victims. The bishops instead are Derio Olivero, 59 years old, bishop of La Spezia-Sarzana-Brugnato, who had had contact with a 32-year-old priest then hospitalized urgently for virus symptoms.
This is the case of Fr. Paolo Camminati, of the diocese of Piacenza-Bobbio, 53. From Trentino comes the news of the death of an elderly but still dynamic priest like Fr. Luigi Trottner, 86, parish priest of Campitello in Val di Fassa. In the nearby diocese of Bolzano-Bressanone, however, Fr. Salvatore Tonini, 84 year old of Trentino origin, died. Among the dead in Bergamo are: Fr Guglielmo Micheli, 86; Fr. Adriano Locatelli, 71 years old; Fr. Ettore Persico, 77 years old; and Fr. Donato Forlani, 88. Brescia in a few hours: Fr. Giuseppe Toninelli, 79 years old,, and Monsignor Domenico Gregorelli, 86 years old, ordained in Florence, then moved to Fermo. A priest from the South who lost his life is Fr. Antonio Di Stasio, 85.


 Parma too continues to mourn its priests torn by the virus, which have reached 6. News of other priests who disappeared then arrive from Milan, Cremona and - first priest of the South - from Valllo of Lucania. To them are added religious, nuns, deacons, diocesan Curia staff, office managers and collaborators. Priests get sick and die like the others, together with the others, perhaps even more than the others, since they minister to the sick.

This is certainly the case in Bergamo where so far the priests who died for or with the virus are 17.Before the four cases reported at the beginning, Fr. Enzo Zoppetti (88 years), Fr. Francesco Perico (91) and Fr. Gian Pietro Paganessi (79) died in one day. In the previous days Fr. Remo Luiselli (81 years), Fr. Gaetano Burini (83), Fr. Umberto Tombini (83), Fr. Giuseppe Berardelli (72), Fr. Giancarlo Nava (70), Fr. Silvano Sirtoli (59 years old) , Fr. Tarcisio Casali (82), Monsignor Achille Belotti (82), Fr. Mariano Carrara (72) and Monsignor Tarcisio Ferrari (84). The Pope wanted to approach the Orobic diocese by calling its bishop Francesco Beschi. Priests who have served their communities for a lifetime are now buried without a funeral, like other coronavirus victims.


In the diocese of Lodi, the Pope called bishop Maurizio Malvestiti in recent days and, on March 17, for the pastor of another diocese who had been severely tested by the epidemic like Cremona. Francis - informed the Lombard diocese - he "intended to make sure of the health conditions of our bishop" Antonio Napolioni, hospitalized for several days due to the symptoms of the infection and then discharged. The Bishop, after thanking the Lord for the great support perceived in the proximity of so many bishops and faithful, therefore represented the Pope the drama of the situation, and above all he witnessed the moving momentum of service put in place by doctors, nurses, volunteers and many other categories of the community, which - proven - does not give up. In particular,  Pope Francis assured his prayer for all and, as always, concluded by asking to pray for him.

A diocese in one day - on March 19 - doubled the number of deceased priests: from two to four. Monsignor Giuseppe was added to the journalist Fr. Vincenzo Rini (great friend of Avvenire), 75 years old, and to Fr. Mario Cavalleri, 104 years old, who was a welcoming reality for the poor, drug addicts and refugees. Aresi, 91 years old, honorary canon and then penitentiary of the Cathedral, and Fr. Albino Aglio, 93 years old, from 1993 to 2002 parish priest of Sant'Imperio, in the city.


Milan in three days - between 17 and 19 March - lost three priests. . Great emotion aroused the disappearance (primarily attributable to heart problems) of Fr. Marco Barbetta, 82 years old, chaplain of the Polytechnic. Similar dismay for the death, after days of struggle in intensive care, of Fr. Luigi Giussani, 70, vicar of the popular Milanese parish of San Protaso. Two Ambrosian priests linked to CL, both always in the midst of young people. On the day of San Giuseppe the news of the death of Fr. Ezio Bisiello, 64 years old, a very loved character in Brianza having been parish priest of Ronco Briantino, after having carried out his ministry in the Varese area, between Somma Lombardo and Gallarate.

Even the diocese of Parma is paying a heavy tribute with 6 dead priests: Fr. Giorgio Bocchi and Fr. Pietro Montali (both 89 years old), Fr. Andrea Avanzini (the youngest priest who has died so far with his 55 years, probably infected by the elderly mother , positive, with whom he lived) and 94-year-old Fr. Franco Minardi, who was second director of the diocesan Caritas. M Artedi '17 died Fr. Still Fanfoni, 82 years. Two days later, Fr. Giuseppe Fadani, 83, died at the head of the parish of Carignano, at the gates of Parma.

The diocese of Reggio Emilia-Guastalla lost Fr. Guido Mortari, 83.
Fr. Giorgio Bosini , 79 years old, herefore it is still difficult to trace death to the virus with certainty, like the twins Fr. Mario and Fr. Giovanni Boselli, 87 years old, incredibly dead a few days later. Certainly killed by the contagion was Fr. Giovanni Cordani, 83, parish priest of Rivergaro, long teacher. To them is therefore added Fr. Paolo Camminati.

Of the diocese of Lodi was Fr. Carlo Patti, 66 years old, who also died on Tuesday 17 March.

To the two victims mentioned in the previous day, the previous death of Fr. Giovanni Girelli, 72 years old, serving in the pastoral unit of Orzinuovi, a town slain by Covid-19 , must be added in the diocese of Brescia .

Two deaths also in the dioceses of Piedmont : in Casale Monferrato Fr. Mario Defechi, 89 years old, and in Tortona Fr. Giacomo Buscaglia, 82.


It is the diocese of Salerno-Campagna-Acerno that has to count the first priest of the South who died from the contagion. It is the parish priest of Caggiano Fr. Alessandro Brignone, 45 years old, died in the night between 18 and 19 March at the Polla hospital.

In Lecco, Father Remo Rota, a 77-year-old sacrament missionary, died. Mourning also among the Xaverians of Parma: the coronavirus took away Father Nicola Masi.

The Pope made a special phone call to the bishop of Bergamo which suffered the greatest loss of priests and religious.

The Bishop said, in particular, he (the Pope) asked me to bring his closeness to the sick and to all those who in different ways are doing heroically for the good of others: doctors, nurses, civil and health authorities, law enforcement.  Pope Francis promised that he brings us into his heart and in his daily prayers.


The priests who died in these days have been buried without funeral rites, like all the other victims of the virus. Please Pray for the souls of these priests and all victims of COVID-19.

Edited from Source: https://www.avvenire.it/attualita/Pagine/coronavirus-i-preti-morti-emilia-lombardia

Wow Parking Lot Eucharistic Adoration in Parts of the US and Canada with Prayers from Parishioners in their Cars


The Catholic Standard reports that on March 19, the Solemnity of St. Joseph, a five-foot tall monstrance stood on an altar outside the doors of St. Andrew Apostle School in Silver Spring, Maryland.

That night, nearly 150 cars filled with people took part in a drive-in Eucharistic Adoration.

In light of the coronavirus pandemic and the Center for Disease Control’s recommended six feet distance guidelines for individuals, this drive-in Eucharistic Adoration allowed for dozens to adore the Blessed Sacrament in the safest way possible.

“It was really powerful,” Father Dan Leary, pastor at St. Andrew Apostle, said. “People were so deeply touched by the reality of it.”

Many other parishes across the US and Canada have held similar events including Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in Maryland; here are their initiatives:
Until we can return to normalcy, IHM will have "drive-in" services. Our Saturday Confession time (2:30 pm -3:45 pm) will take place outside next to the priest residence. During weekend Mass times (Saturday 4 pm, Sunday 8:30 am, 11:15 am, 1 pm), we will have Eucharistic Adoration with a Liturgy of the Word proclaimed on loudspeakers (please remain in your vehicles). On Sunday, the 'drive-in' Eucharistic Adoration in the parking lot will be continuous from 8:30 am to 2 pm. In obedience to the Archbishop, no distribution of the Holy Eucharist will occur. Everyone must stay in their cars. All weekend events are weather dependent.
The idea, he said, came from the suggestions of many parishioners as well as ideas from the Archdiocese of Washington. (see below #8)




“He’s turning the hearts and eyes of the people back to Him,” he added.

In this time away from frequent sacraments such as daily Mass, Father Leary reassured his parish in an email message that grace is still available to them.

I believe this loss will be a tremendous source of grace and strength for you during these next few weeks,” he wrote. “It is no accident that we are being asked to make this Eucharistic Sacrifice during Lent. We are being asked to go into the desert, in a sense, where we will be ‘parched’ and will long for Christ’s Body and Blood in a way that we perhaps have not felt before. How good God is to allow this time of grace.”

The parish of St. Andrew Apostle also plans to set up a calendar for members to sign up for holy hours around the clock from their own homes.

Future drive-in Eucharistic Adoration holy hours may be scheduled at various parishes throughout the Archdiocese of Washington.
Some parishes are keeping their doors open all day everyday of the week with the Blessed Sacrament exposed for private prayer.
Edited from the Catholic Standard with added information from the Archdiocese of Washington and Facebook 

#BreakingNews nearly 60 Nuns Infected with Coronavirus from 2 Catholic Convents in Rome, Italy


Coronavirus, 59 positive nuns in one day: two convents isolated in Rome. Fears for the Vannini hospital run by the religious.

There are 59 nuns who have tested positive for the Coronavirus in one day in Rome. Two convents, in the southeast of the capital, have been isolated.

The first case concerns the Figlie di San Camillo Institute, in via Anagnina, where there are 40 positive nuns out of the 80 who live inside the convent. Some of them commute to northern Italy. One of the sisters is hospitalized with breathing difficulties. The convent of Grottaferrata is directly connected with another convent of the Daughters of San Camillo, that of via Labico, in Tor Pignattara, whose sisters manage the Vannini hospital, private health service, but with its first aid now an important ministry.  Informal sources within Vannini, call for calm, specifying that "the convents are separated even if, obviously, there may be meetings, also in relation to the sick" and "most of the nuns have managerial roles, therefore not strictly contact with patients ".
 In percentage, even more serious is the case of the Institute of the Congregation of the Angelic Sisters of San Paolo, in via Casilina (height of Torre Gaia) where 19 sisters out of 21 who make up the community were positive. In this case, the nuns run a school, which however has been closed - as per government decree - since 5 March.

 While, as far as we learn, the Lazio Region is thinking of building a new Covid Hospital in the Castelli Romani.
Edited from Source: https://www.ilfattoquotidiano.it/2020/03/20/coronavirus-59-suore-positive-in-un-giorno-isolati-due-conventi-a-roma-timori-per-lospedale-vannini-gestito-dalle-religiose/5743309/
Image of the Institute Nuns from https://www.romasette.it/canonizzazione-di-madre-giuseppina-vannini-la-carita-sia-la-vostra-divisa/

At Mass, Pope Francis says "One of the ways to find the Lord is through prayer.." and "We pray for peace in families today during this crisis..." Full Video


Pope at Mass: “Prayer must begin with humility”
Pope Francis offers Mass on Saturday morning at the Casa Santa Marta for families, praying “that they might find a way of communicating and building loving relationships”.
By Vatican News

“Today, I would like to remember families who cannot leave their homes,” Pope Francis said at the beginning of the Saturday morning liturgy at the Casa Santa Marta chapel.

“Perhaps the farthest they can go is their balcony. …May they know how to find a way of communicating well, of building loving relationships within the family. And that they might know how to conquer the anguish of this moment together in the family. We pray for peace in families today during this crisis, and for creativity.”

During his homily, the Pope focused on the two different styles of approaching God presented in the day’s Gospel (Luke 18:9-14).

Coming to the Lord
“When that ‘return home’ ” from yesterday’s reading “touches the heart, the response is ‘Let’s return to the Lord’,”  the Pope said at the beginning of his homily. “Come, let us return to the Lord…He has torn us to pieces, but He will heal us; He has struck us down, but He will bandage our wounds…. Let us set ourselves to know the Lord; that He will come is as certain as the dawn…”, he quoted from the First Reading (Hosea 6:1-6).

“With this hope the people begin their journey to return to the Lord. One of the ways to find the Lord is through prayer. We pray to the Lord. We return to Him.”

Listen to our report
Presumption vs. humility
The Pope then contrasted two styles of approaching the Lord. He provided three examples from the Gospels: the elder son and the prodigal son, the rich man and Lazarus, and the Pharisee and the tax collector from the day’s Gospel.

The Pharisee in the Gospel is the epitomy of the presumptuous style.

“He goes to pray, but in order to say how good he is — as if to say to the Lord, ‘See how good I am! If you need anything, let me know and I'll take care of your problem’. This is how he interacted with God: presumptuously. Perhaps he did everything the law said to do: ‘I fast twice a week. I pay tithes on all I have.' I’m good! …When we go to the Lord too confident in ourselves we will fall into presumption…like the elder son, or the rich man who didn’t need anything.”

The other style, modeled by the tax collector in the day’s Gospel, shows us the right way to approach God, the Pope said. He doesn’t approach the altar but remains at a distance, not even daring to raise his eyes to heaven. Beating his breast, the tax collector says, “Be merciful to me a sinner”.

"In this way, the Lord teaches us how to pray, how to draw near…to the Lord – humbly… Praying with our "souls exposed", without make-up or dressing ourselves up with our own virtue. As we read at the beginning of Mass, He forgives all our sins. But He needs me to show them to Him… I pray face to face with soul exposed…. The way is to lower ourselves. The path is our reality. The only man here in this parable who understood his reality was the tax collector. ‘You are God and I'm a sinner. That's the reality.’ But I say that I'm a sinner not with my mouth but with my heart.”

The Pope’s Prayer
“May the Lord teach us to understand this attitude in order to begin praying”, the Pope concluded his homily.

“When we begin praying with our own justifications, with our securities, that's not prayer. That's like speaking to a mirror. Instead, when we begin praying with our true reality – I'm a sinner – this is a good step forward in allowing the Lord to look at us. May Jesus teach us this.”

FULL TEXT Source: VaticanNews.va

Holy Mass Online : Saturday, March 21, 2020 - #Eucharist - Readings + Video in Lent


Saturday of the Third Week of Lent
Lectionary: 242
Reading 1HOS 6:1-6
“Come, let us return to the LORD,
it is he who has rent, but he will heal us;
he has struck us, but he will bind our wounds.
He will revive us after two days;
on the third day he will raise us up,
to live in his presence.
Let us know, let us strive to know the LORD;
as certain as the dawn is his coming,
and his judgment shines forth like the light of day!
He will come to us like the rain,
like spring rain that waters the earth.”

What can I do with you, Ephraim?
What can I do with you, Judah?
Your piety is like a morning cloud,
like the dew that early passes away.
For this reason I smote them through the prophets,
I slew them by the words of my mouth;
For it is love that I desire, not sacrifice,
and knowledge of God rather than burnt offerings.

Responsorial Psalm51:3-4, 18-19, 20-21AB
R.    (see Hosea 6:6)  It is mercy I desire, and not sacrifice.
Have mercy on me, O God, in your goodness;
in the greatness of your compassion wipe out my offense.
Thoroughly wash me from my guilt
and of my sin cleanse me.
R.    It is mercy I desire, and not sacrifice.
For you are not pleased with sacrifices;
should I offer a burnt offering, you would not accept it.
My sacrifice, O God, is a contrite spirit;
a heart contrite and humbled, O God, you will not spurn.
R.    It is mercy I desire, and not sacrifice.
Be bountiful, O LORD, to Zion in your kindness
by rebuilding the walls of Jerusalem;
Then shall you be pleased with due sacrifices,
burnt offerings and holocausts.
R.    It is mercy I desire, and not sacrifice.

Verse Before The GospelPS 95:8
If today you hear his voice,
harden not your hearts.

GospelLK 18:9-14
Jesus addressed this parable
to those who were convinced of their own righteousness
and despised everyone else.
“Two people went up to the temple area to pray;
one was a Pharisee and the other was a tax collector.
The Pharisee took up his position and spoke this prayer to himself,
‘O God, I thank you that I am not like the rest of humanity —
greedy, dishonest, adulterous — or even like this tax collector.
I fast twice a week,
and I pay tithes on my whole income.’
But the tax collector stood off at a distance
and would not even raise his eyes to heaven
but beat his breast and prayed,
‘O God, be merciful to me a sinner.’
I tell you, the latter went home justified, not the former;
for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled,
and the one who humbles himself will be exalted.”

Bishops of England Suspend Public Masses but say "Our churches will remain open" and Offer "..ways in which we will sanctify Sunday, and indeed every day."


Public Worship (from Website of the Bishops' Conference of England)
In response to the Coronavirus pandemic, so many aspects of our lives must change. This includes the ways in which we publicly express our faith. It is very clear that, following official advice and in order to keep each other safe, save lives and support the NHS, at this time we must not gather for public acts of worship in our churches.
This will begin from Friday evening, 20th March 2020, until further notice.

Downloads

You can download the letter from the President and Vice President of the Bishops’ Conference and a PDF offering Liturgical Advice:
More information on our Coronavirus (COVID-19) page.

Prayers

We have some prayers that have been supplied by the Liturgy Office of the Bishops’ Conference that can be used during a time of ‘flu and illness.

CATHOLIC BISHOPS’ CONFERENCE OF ENGLAND AND WALES
A letter from the President and Vice-President
on behalf of all the Bishops of the Conference
Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,
In response to the Coronavirus pandemic, so many aspects of our lives must change.
This includes the ways in which we publicly express our faith. It is very clear that,
following official advice and in order to keep each other safe, save lives and support
the NHS, at this time we must not gather for public acts of worship in our churches.
This will begin from Friday evening, 20th March 2020, until further notice.
Our churches will remain open. They are not closing. They will be a focal point of
prayer, where you will find solace and strength. In visiting our churches at this time,
we will observe with great care the practices of hygiene and the guidance on social
distancing.
However, the celebration of Mass, Sunday by Sunday and day by day, will take place
without a public congregation.
Knowing that the Mass is being celebrated; joining in spiritually in that celebration;
watching the live-streaming of the Mass; following its prayers at home; making an act
of spiritual communion: this is how we share in the Sacrifice of Christ in these days.
These are the ways in which we will sanctify Sunday, and indeed every day.
We want everyone to understand that in these emergency circumstances, and for as
long as they last, the obligation to attend Mass on Sundays and Holy Days is removed.
This is, without doubt, the teaching of the Church (Catechism of the Catholic Church
2181). This pandemic is the 'serious reason' why this obligation does not apply at this
time.
You will find more details about the pathway of prayer and sacramental life we are
now to take in the accompanying document and on the Bishops’ Conference website
(www.cbcew.org.uk). Your own bishop and parish priest will provide further support,
encouragement and information about our way of prayer together in the coming
weeks.
The second vital aspect of these challenging times is our care for each other. There are
so many ways in which we are to do this: being attentive to the needs of our neighbour,
especially the elderly and vulnerable; contributing to our local food banks;
volunteering for charitable initiatives and organisations; simply keeping in touch by all
the means open to us.
During these disturbing and threatening times, the rhythm of the prayer of the Church
will continue. Please play your part in it. The effort of daily kindness and mutual
support for all will continue and increase. Please play your part in this too. For your
commitment to this, we thank you.
'The Lord is my shepherd,
There is nothing I shall want.'
May God bless us all.
Vincent Cardinal Nichols Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP
President Vice-President
18th March 2020
Source: https://www.cbcew.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2020/03/CBCEW-Letter-Public-Worship-COVID19-180320.pdf

Saint March 21 : St. Nicholas of Flue : Patron of Difficult Marriages, Large families, #Swiss Guards, Switzerland


 



St. Nicholas of Flue
HERMIT AND SWISS POLITICAL FIGURE
Born:
21 March 1417 at Sachseln, Canton Obwalden, Lake Lucerne, Switzerland
Died:
21 March 1487
Canonized:
15 May 1947 by Pope Pius XII
Major Shrine:
Sachseln, Switzerland
Patron of:
councilmen, difficult marriages, large families, magistrates, parents of large families, Pontifical Swiss Guards, separated spouses, Switzerland

Born 21 March, 1417, on the Flüeli, a fertile plateau near Sachseln, Canton Obwalden, Switzerland; died 21 March, 1487, as a recluse in a neighboring ravine, called Ranft. He was the oldest son of pious, well-to-do peasants and from his earliest youth was fond of prayer, practiced mortification, and conscientiously performed the labor of a peasant boy.
At the age of 21 he entered the army and took part in the battle of Ragaz in 1446. Probably he fought in the battles near the Etzel in 1439, near Baar in the Canton of Zug in 1443, and assisted in the capture of Zürich in 1444. He took up arms again in the so-called Thurgau war against Archduke Sigismund of Austria in 1460. It was due to his influence that the Dominican Convent St. Katharinental, whither many Austrians had fled after the capture of Diessenhofen, was not destroyed by the Swiss confederates. Heeding the advice of his parents he married, about the age of twenty-five, a pious girl from Sachseln, named Dorothy Wyssling, who bore him five sons and five daughters. His youngest son, Nicholas, born in 1467, became a priest and a doctor of theology.
Though averse to worldly dignities, he was elected cantonal councillor and judge. The fact that in 1462 he was one of five arbiters appointed to settle a dispute between the parish of Stans and the monastery of Engelberg, shows the esteem in which he was held. After living about twenty-five years in wedlock he listened to an inspiration of God and with the consent of his wife left his family on 16 October, 1467, to live as a hermit. At first he intended to go to a foreign country, but when he came into the neighborhood of Basle, a divine inspiration ordered him to take up his abode in the Ranft, a valley along the Melcha, about an hour's walk from Sachseln.
Here, known as "Brother Klaus", he abode over twenty years, without taking any bodily food or drink, as was established through a careful investigation, made by the civil as well as the ecclesiastical authorities of his times. He wore neither shoes nor cap, and even in winter was clad merely in a hermit's gown. In 1468 he saved the town of Sarnen from a conflagration by his prayers and the sign of the cross. God also favored him with numerous visions and the gift of prophecy. Distinguished persons from nearly every country of Europe came to him for counsel in matters of the utmost importance. At first he lived in a narrow hut, which he himself had built with branches and leaves, and came daily to Mass either at Sachseln or at Kerns. Early in 1469 the civil authorities built a cell and a chapel for him, and on 29 April of the same year the chapel was dedicated by the vicar-general of Constance, Thomas, Bishop of Ascalon. In 1479 a chaplain was put in charge of the chapel, and thenceforth Nicholas always remained in the Ranft. When in 1480 delegates of the Swiss confederates assembled at Stans to settle their differences, and civil war seemed inevitable, Henry Imgrund, the pastor of Stans, hastened to Nicholas, begging him to prevent the shedding of blood. The priest returned to the delegates with the hermit's counsels and propositions, and civil war was averted. Nicholas was beatified by Pope Clement IX in 1669. Numerous pilgrims visit the chapel near the church of Sachseln, where his relics are preserved. His feast is celebrated on 21 March.
Source: The Catholic Encyclopedia
PRAYER OF ST. NICHOLAS OF FLUE My Lord and my God, take everything from me that keeps me from You. My Lord and my God, give everything to me that brings me near to You. My Lord and my God, take me away from myself and give me completely to You. Amen.