Saturday, March 28, 2020

Sunday Mass Online : Sunday, March 29, 2020 - #Eucharist in Lent - Readings + Video


Fifth Sunday of Lent

Lectionary: 34 Reading 1EZ 37:12-14

Thus says the Lord GOD:
O my people, I will open your graves
and have you rise from them,
and bring you back to the land of Israel.
Then you shall know that I am the LORD,
when I open your graves and have you rise from them,
O my people!
I will put my spirit in you that you may live,
and I will settle you upon your land;
thus you shall know that I am the LORD.
I have promised, and I will do it, says the LORD.

Responsorial PsalmPS 130:1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8.

R. (7) With the Lord there is mercy and fullness of redemption.
Out of the depths I cry to you, O LORD;
LORD, hear my voice!
Let your ears be attentive
to my voice in supplication.
R. With the Lord there is mercy and fullness of redemption.
If you, O LORD, mark iniquities,
LORD, who can stand?
But with you is forgiveness,
that you may be revered.
R. With the Lord there is mercy and fullness of redemption.
I trust in the LORD;
my soul trusts in his word.
More than sentinels wait for the dawn,
let Israel wait for the LORD.
R. With the Lord there is mercy and fullness of redemption.
For with the LORD is kindness
and with him is plenteous redemption;
And he will redeem Israel
from all their iniquities.
R. With the Lord there is mercy and fullness of redemption.

Reading 2ROM 8:8-11

Brothers and sisters:
Those who are in the flesh cannot please God.
But you are not in the flesh;
on the contrary, you are in the spirit,
if only the Spirit of God dwells in you.
Whoever does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to him.
But if Christ is in you,
although the body is dead because of sin,
the spirit is alive because of righteousness.
If the Spirit of the one who raised Jesus from the dead dwells in you,
the one who raised Christ from the dead
will give life to your mortal bodies also,
through his Spirit dwelling in you.

Verse Before The GospelJN 11:25A, 26

I am the resurrection and the life, says the Lord;
whoever believes in me, even if he dies, will never die.

GospelJN 11:1-45

Now a man was ill, Lazarus from Bethany,
the village of Mary and her sister Martha.
Mary was the one who had anointed the Lord with perfumed oil
and dried his feet with her hair;
it was her brother Lazarus who was ill.

So the sisters sent word to him saying,
“Master, the one you love is ill.”
When Jesus heard this he said,
“This illness is not to end in death,
but is for the glory of God,
that the Son of God may be glorified through it.”
Now Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus.
So when he heard that he was ill,
he remained for two days in the place where he was.
Then after this he said to his disciples,
“Let us go back to Judea.”
The disciples said to him,
“Rabbi, the Jews were just trying to stone you,
and you want to go back there?”
Jesus answered,
“Are there not twelve hours in a day?
If one walks during the day, he does not stumble,
because he sees the light of this world.
But if one walks at night, he stumbles,
because the light is not in him.”
He said this, and then told them,
“Our friend Lazarus is asleep,
but I am going to awaken him.”
So the disciples said to him,
“Master, if he is asleep, he will be saved.”
But Jesus was talking about his death,
while they thought that he meant ordinary sleep.
So then Jesus said to them clearly,
“Lazarus has died.
And I am glad for you that I was not there,
that you may believe.
Let us go to him.”
So Thomas, called Didymus, said to his fellow disciples,
“Let us also go to die with him.”
When Jesus arrived, he found that Lazarus
had already been in the tomb for four days.
Now Bethany was near Jerusalem, only about two miles away.
And many of the Jews had come to Martha and Mary
to comfort them about their brother.
When Martha heard that Jesus was coming,
she went to meet him;
but Mary sat at home.
Martha said to Jesus,
“Lord, if you had been here,
my brother would not have died.
But even now I know that whatever you ask of God,
God will give you.”
Jesus said to her,

“Your brother will rise.”
Martha said to him,
“I know he will rise,
in the resurrection on the last day.”
Jesus told her,
“I am the resurrection and the life;
whoever believes in me, even if he dies, will live,
and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die.
Do you believe this?”
She said to him, “Yes, Lord.
I have come to believe that you are the Christ, the Son of God,
the one who is coming into the world.”
When she had said this,
she went and called her sister Mary secretly, saying,
“The teacher is here and is asking for you.”
As soon as she heard this,
she rose quickly and went to him.
For Jesus had not yet come into the village,
but was still where Martha had met him.
So when the Jews who were with her in the house comforting her
saw Mary get up quickly and go out,
they followed her,
presuming that she was going to the tomb to weep there.
When Mary came to where Jesus was and saw him,
she fell at his feet and said to him,
“Lord, if you had been here,
my brother would not have died.”
When Jesus saw her weeping and the Jews who had come with her weeping,
he became perturbed and deeply troubled, and said,
“Where have you laid him?”
They said to him, “Sir, come and see.”
And Jesus wept.
So the Jews said, “See how he loved him.”
But some of them said,
“Could not the one who opened the eyes of the blind man
have done something so that this man would not have died?”
So Jesus, perturbed again, came to the tomb.
It was a cave, and a stone lay across it.
Jesus said, “Take away the stone.”
Martha, the dead man’s sister, said to him,
“Lord, by now there will be a stench;
he has been dead for four days.”
Jesus said to her,
“Did I not tell you that if you believe
you will see the glory of God?”
So they took away the stone.
And Jesus raised his eyes and said,

“Father, I thank you for hearing me.
I know that you always hear me;
but because of the crowd here I have said this,
that they may believe that you sent me.”
And when he had said this,
He cried out in a loud voice,
“Lazarus, come out!”
The dead man came out,
tied hand and foot with burial bands,
and his face was wrapped in a cloth.
So Jesus said to them,
“Untie him and let him go.”
Now many of the Jews who had come to Mary
and seen what he had done began to believe in him.
The sisters of Lazarus sent word to Jesus, saying,
“Master, the one you love is ill.”
When Jesus heard this he said,
“This illness is not to end in death,
but is for the glory of God,
that the Son of God may be glorified through it.”
Now Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus.
So when he heard that he was ill,
he remained for two days in the place where he was.
Then after this he said to his disciples,
+Let us go back to Judea.”
When Jesus arrived, he found that Lazarus
had already been in the tomb for four days.
When Martha heard that Jesus was coming,
she went to meet him;
but Mary sat at home.
Martha said to Jesus,
“Lord, if you had been here,
my brother would not have died.
But even now I know that whatever you ask of God,
God will give you.”
Jesus said to her,
Your brother will rise.”
Martha said,
“I know he will rise,
in the resurrection on the last day.”
Jesus told her,
“I am the resurrection and the life;
whoever believes in me, even if he dies, will live,
and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die.
Do you believe this?”
She said to him, “Yes, Lord.
I have come to believe that you are the Christ, the Son of God,
the one who is coming into the world.”
He became perturbed and deeply troubled, and said,
“Where have you laid him?”
They said to him, “Sir, come and see.”
And Jesus wept.
So the Jews said, “See how he loved him.”
But some of them said,
“Could not the one who opened the eyes of the blind man
have done something so that this man would not have died?”
So Jesus, perturbed again, came to the tomb.
It was a cave, and a stone lay across it.
Jesus said, “Take away the stone.”
Martha, the dead man’s sister, said to him,
“Lord, by now there will be a stench;
he has been dead for four days.”
Jesus said to her,
“Did I not tell you that if you believe
you will see the glory of God?”
So they took away the stone.
And Jesus raised his eyes and said,
“Father, I thank you for hearing me.
I know that you always hear me;
but because of the crowd here I have said this,
that they may believe that you sent me.”
And when he had said this,
He cried out in a loud voice,
“Lazarus, come out!”
The dead man came out,
tied hand and foot with burial bands,
and his face was wrapped in a cloth.
So Jesus said to them,
“Untie him and let him go.”
Now many of the Jews who had come to Mary
and seen what he had done began to believe in him.

Saint March 29 : St. Barachisius and St. Jonas of Perisa

 

Sts. Barachisius and Jonas
PERSIAN MARTYRS

Died:
24 December 327
They were monks at a monastery in Perisa (modern Iran) and were arrested during the persecution conducted by Sassanid King Shapur II (r. 309-379). Barachisius and Jonas were giving spiritual support to other martyrs when they were taken into custody. Refusing to abjure the faith, Jonas was crushed to death, and his body cut to pieces. Barachisius had brimstone and boiling pitch poured down his throat.

(Taken from Our Sunday Visitor's Encyclopedia of Saints)

#BreakingNews Holy See Confirms Pope Francis does Not have Coronavirus but 2 New Positive Cases in Vatican


Covid-19: 2 new cases in the Vatican, another 170 people tested
The results have confirmed the absence of positive cases among those residing at Casa Santa Marta. All necessary precautions have been taken. The Pope and his closest collaborators are not involved.
By Vatican News

There are two new positive cases of the Covid-19 virus in the Vatican. The Director of the Holy See Press Office, Matteo Bruni, confirmed this in a statement released on Saturday afternoon, referring to the results of analysis undertaken by the health department.

Bruni stated that in the past few days the Health and Hygiene Department had been conducting tests “in compliance with the directives on the coronavirus emergency”. Among the samples taken, one of them turned up positive for the Covid-19 virus. The person in question is an “official of the Secretariat of State” as well as a “resident in Santa Marta”. Since he had already manifested symptoms, he was already in isolation. “At the moment, his health condition is not particularly critical”, Bruni continued, “but as a precautionary measure, the person has been admitted to a Roman hospital and is under observation”. The Vatican’s Health and Hygiene department is in close contact with the hospital.

As soon as this positive case of the virus came to light, Bruni said that “measures were taken according to the health protocols provided, both with regard to the sanitation of the environment, the place of work and residence of the person concerned”. Authorities have also tried to “reconstruct the contact he had with others in the days preceding the test results”. These people have also been tested. The results of those tested have “confirmed the absence of other positive cases among those residing in the Casa Santa Marta”, as well as among the official’s colleagues.

In addition, to be on the safe side, “appropriate sanitation measures were adopted”. A further 170 Holy See employees and residents of the Casa Santa Marta underwent testing. “The results on these latest tests were all negative”, Bruni’s statement reads.

The new total of those affected by the Covid-19 virus among employees of the Holy See and citizens of Vatican City State now stands at 6. “I can confirm”, Bruni’s statement concludes, “that neither the Holy Father, nor his closest collaborators, are involved”.

From the statement of the Director of the Press Office, it is clear why the Holy See waited until all the test results were in, prior to providing this information, so as to be able to state, on the basis of these results and the measures taken, that both the Casa Santa Marta residence and the offices of the Secretariat of State are safe.
Full Text Source: VaticanNews.va

US Bishops' Chairman Explains Cell Phone Confession Not Permitted but Rather a Perfect Act of Contrition during Pandemic


The chairman of the USCCB’s committee on Divine Worship, Archbishop Leonard P. Blair, wrote to U.S. bishops Friday, March 27, 2020 to explain the sacraments of reconciliation and anointing of the sick during the  coronavirus pandemic.
Text from Archbishop Blair:
To: All Bishops
From: Most Rev. Leonard P. Blair, Archbishop of Hartford Chairman, USCCB Committee on Divine Worship
Date: March 27, 2020
Re: Administration of the Sacraments of Reconciliation and Anointing
As Bishops struggle to field the many questions that are arising from priests and the faithful about the availability and administration of the Sacraments, some issues have arisen that have come to the attention of the Committee on Divine Worship.
Two of those questions were referred to the Nuncio for possible referral to the Holy See. Our Nuncio, Archbishop Christophe Pierre, spoke with Archbishop Arthur Roche, Secretary of the Congregation for Divine Worship, and has requested that the following information be shared with all the Bishops:
With regard to Penance, it is clear that the Sacrament is not to be celebrated via cell phone. In addition, in the present circumstances cell phones should not be used even for the amplification of voices between a confessor and penitent who are in visual range of each other. Current threats against the seal of confession also raise questions about information on cell phones.
With regard to the Anointing of the Sick, it is not possible for the anointing with oil to be delegated to someone else, such as a nurse or a doctor.
I might add that when it is not possible to administer the Sacrament, then what the Apostolic Penitentiary said about the Sacrament of Penance might be applied analogously to the Sacrament of the Sick: “Where the individual faithful find themselves in the painful impossibility of receiving sacramental absolution, it should be remembered that perfect contrition, coming from the love of God, beloved above all things, expressed by a sincere request for forgiveness (that which the penitent is at present able to express) and accompanied by votum confessionis, that is, by the firm resolution to have recourse, as soon as possible, to sacramental confession, obtains forgiveness of sins, even mortal ones (cf. CCC, no. 1452).”
***************
Act of Contrition (traditional from VaticanNews) : O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended Thee, and I detest all my sins because of thy just punishments, but most of all because they offend Thee, my God, who art all good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve with the help of Thy grace to sin no more and to avoid the near occasion of sin. Amen.

RIP 5 Catholic Nuns Die of Coronavirus in Italy from one Convent and also their Father Confessor with 13 More in Hospital


The coronavirus entered a convent in Tortona, Italy. Five nuns died in silence, as they lived in silence. In two weeks the number of deaths from the Little Missionary Sisters of Charity , a congregation linked to the figure of Fr. Orione, who also perished from the coronavirus, rose to five.

Sister Maria Caterina Cafasso, 82 years old, and mother Maria Ortensia Turati, 88 years old, mother superior for 12 years until 2005, were the first to die one after the other, at the Tortona hospital, which in these days has been transformed into Covid hospital. Then on Monday two other sisters, Sister Maria Filomena Licitra, 98 years old, and Maria Ulisia Felici, passed away. Finally last night it was the turn of Sister Maria Cristina Fontes, 91, to bid farewell to the world.
Their father confessor, Fr. Cesare Concas, 81, also died on 20 March at the hospital in Novi Ligure. And there is a also concern for the other 13 sisters who are still hospitalized because they are coronavirus positive, some in very serious conditions

Here is a Video of these same Sisters praying before the Blessed Sacrament during the Coronavirus Outbreak:
 

Pope Francis Prays for those who have gone Hungry because of the Coronavirus - at Mass - Full Video - Homily


MORNING CELEBRATION BROADCAST LIVE
FROM THE CHAPEL OF CASA SANTA MARTA

HOMILY OF THE HOLY FATHER FRANCIS

Saturday, March 28, 2020

Introduction to Mass

In recent days, in some parts of the world, there have been consequences - some consequences - of the pandemic; one of them is hunger. We begin to see people who are hungry, because they cannot work, did not have a permanent job, and for many circumstances. We are already beginning to see the "after", which will come later but begin now. We pray for families who are beginning to feel the need because of the pandemic.

Homily

"And each returned to his home" (Jn. 7.53): after the discussion and all this, each returned to his convictions. There is a rift in the people: the people who follow Jesus listen to him - he does not notice the long time that goes by listening to him, because the Word of Jesus enters the heart - and the group of doctors of the Law who a priori reject Jesus because they do not works according to the law, according to them. They are two groups of people. The people who love Jesus follow him and the group of intellectuals of the Law, the leaders of Israel, the leaders of the people. This is clear "when the guards returned to the chief priests and said:" Why didn't you bring him here? "Replied the guards:" Never has a man spoken like this. " But the Pharisees replied to them: “Have you too been deceived? Did any of the leaders of the Pharisees believe in him? But these people who do not know the Law are cursed "(Jn 7,45-49). This group of the doctors of the Law, the elite, feels contempt for Jesus. But also, it feels contempt for the people, "those people", who are ignorant, who know nothing. The holy faithful people of God believe in Jesus, follow him, and this group of elites, the doctors of the Law, detaches themselves from the people and does not receive Jesus. But why, if these were illustrious, intelligent, had they studied? But they had a big flaw: they had lost the memory of their belonging to a people.

The people of God follow Jesus ... he cannot explain why, but he follows him and reaches the heart, and he does not tire. Let's think about the day of the multiplication of the loaves: they spent the whole day with Jesus, to the point that the apostles said to Jesus: "Leave them, so that they go away to buy food" (cf. Mk 6:36). The apostles also took their distance, did not take into consideration, did not despise, but did not take into consideration the people of God. "Let them go to eat". Jesus' response: "Give them something to eat" (cf. Mk 6,37). He puts them back into the people.

This rift between the elite of religious leaders and the people is a drama that comes from afar. We also think in the Old Testament of the attitude of the sons of Eli in the temple: they used the people of God; and if any of them a little atheist comes to fulfill the Law, they said: "They are superstitious". The contempt of the people. The contempt of people "who are not as polite as we who have studied, who know ...". Instead, the people of God has a great grace: the nose. The sense of knowing where the Spirit is. He is a sinner, like us: he is a sinner. But he has that sense of knowing the ways of salvation.

The problem with the elites, with elite clerics like these, is that they had lost the memory of their belonging to the people of God; they are sophisticated, they have moved on to another social class, they feel they are leaders. This is clericalism, which already took place there. "But how come - I heard these days - how come these nuns, these priests who are healthy go to the poor to feed them, and can they take the coronavirus? But tell the mother superior that you don't let the nuns come out, tell the bishop that you don't let the priests come out! They are for the sacraments! But  the government is to feed others! ". This is what we are talking about these days: the same topic. "They are second-class people: we are the ruling class, we must not get our hands dirty with the poor".

Many times I think: they are good people - priests, nuns - who do not have the courage to go and serve the poor. Something is missing. What these people were missing, the doctors of the Law. They lost their memory, they lost what Jesus felt in his heart: that he was part of his own people. They have lost the memory of what God said to David: "I took you from the flock." They have lost the memory of their belonging to the flock.
And these, each, each returned to his home (cf. Jn. 7,53). A rift. Nicodemus, who saw something - he was a restless man, perhaps not so brave, too diplomatic, but restless - went to Jesus then, but was faithful to what he could; tries to mediate and takes from the Law: "Does our Law judge a man before he has listened to him and knows what he does?" (Jn 7.51). They answered him; but they did not answer the question about the Law: “Are you also from Galilee? She studies. You are ignorant, and you will see that a prophet does not arise from Galilee "(Jn 7,52). And so they ended the story.

Let us also think today of so many men and women qualified in the service of God who are good and go to serve the people; many priests who do not detach themselves from the people. The day before yesterday I received a photograph of a priest, mountain pastor, of many villages, in a place where it snows, and in the snow he took the monstrance to the small villages to give the blessing. He didn't care for the snow, he didn't care about the burning that the cold made him feel in his hands in contact with the metal of the monstrance: he only cared to bring Jesus to the people.

We think, each of us, which side we are on, if we are in the middle, a little undecided, if we are with the feeling of the people of God, of the faithful people of God that cannot fail: it has that infallibilitas in credendo. And let's think about the elite that detaches itself from the people of God, to that clericalism. And perhaps the advice that Paul gives to his disciple, the bishop, young bishop, Timothy, will do us all good: "Remember your mother and grandmother" (cf. 2 Tim. 1,5). Remember your mom and grandmother. If Paul advised this it was because he knew well the danger to which this sense of elite brought in our leadership.

Prayer to make spiritual communion:

People who cannot communicate because of the distance now make spiritual communion.

At your feet, O my Jesus, I bow down and offer you the repentance of my contrite heart that abysses itself into its nothingness and Your holy presence. I adore you in the Sacrament of Your love, the ineffable Eucharist. I wish to receive you in the poor home that my heart offers you. In anticipation of the happiness of sacramental communion, I want to possess you in spirit. Come to me, oh my Jesus, that I come to you. May Your love inflame my whole being for life and death. I believe in you, I hope in you. I love you. So be it.

Saint March 28 : St. Venturino of Bergamo a Dominican Missionary


 ST. VENTURINO OF BERGAMO

 Birth: 1304
 Death: 1346
 Dominican preacher and missionary crusader. A native of Bergamo, Italy, he joined the Dominicans in 1319 and soon distinguished himself as a brilliant preacher, attracting huge crowds throughout northern Italy. Pleased with his ability to reach large numbers of believers, he announced in 1335 his intention to go on a pilgrimage to Rome. When Pope Benedict XII (r. 1334-1342) learned of the pilgrimage, he feared Venturino might be planning to crown himself pope, and so forbade the friar to proceed. This decree was joined by one issued by the Dominicans themselves at the Chapter in London (1335). Ignorant of these bans, Venturino proceeded to Rome and then to Avignon where he was arrested and imprisoned until 1343. He is also known for helping to organize a crusade, at the behest of PopeClement VI (r. 1342-1352), against the Turks who were then menacing Europe.
Shared from Goasodiocese