Sunday, June 14, 2020

Holy Mass Online - Readings and Video : Monday, June 15, 2020 - #Eucharist - Your Virtual Church



Monday of the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 365
Reading 11 KGS 21:1-16
Naboth the Jezreelite had a vineyard in Jezreel
next to the palace of Ahab, king of Samaria.
Ahab said to Naboth, “Give me your vineyard to be my vegetable garden,
since it is close by, next to my house.
I will give you a better vineyard in exchange, or,
if you prefer, I will give you its value in money.”
Naboth answered him, “The LORD forbid
that I should give you my ancestral heritage.”
Ahab went home disturbed and angry at the answer
Naboth the Jezreelite had made to him:
“I will not give you my ancestral heritage.”
Lying down on his bed, he turned away from food and would not eat.

His wife Jezebel came to him and said to him,
“Why are you so angry that you will not eat?”
He answered her, “Because I spoke to Naboth the Jezreelite
and said to him, ‘Sell me your vineyard, or,
if you prefer, I will give you a vineyard in exchange.’
But he refused to let me have his vineyard.”
His wife Jezebel said to him,
“A fine ruler over Israel you are indeed!
Get up.
Eat and be cheerful.
I will obtain the vineyard of Naboth the Jezreelite for you.”

So she wrote letters in Ahab’s name and,
having sealed them with his seal,
sent them to the elders and to the nobles
who lived in the same city with Naboth.
This is what she wrote in the letters:
“Proclaim a fast and set Naboth at the head of the people.
Next, get two scoundrels to face him
and accuse him of having cursed God and king.
Then take him out and stone him to death.”
His fellow citizens—the elders and nobles who dwelt in his city—
did as Jezebel had ordered them in writing,
through the letters she had sent them.
They proclaimed a fast and placed Naboth at the head of the people.
Two scoundrels came in and confronted him with the accusation,
“Naboth has cursed God and king.”
And they led him out of the city and stoned him to death.
Then they sent the information to Jezebel
that Naboth had been stoned to death.

When Jezebel learned that Naboth had been stoned to death,
she said to Ahab,
“Go on, take possession of the vineyard
of Naboth the Jezreelite that he refused to sell you,
because Naboth is not alive, but dead.”
On hearing that Naboth was dead, Ahab started off on his way
down to the vineyard of Naboth the Jezreelite,
to take possession of it.

Responsorial Psalm5:2-3AB, 4B-6A, 6B-7
R. (2b) Lord, listen to my groaning.
Hearken to my words, O LORD,
attend to my sighing.
Heed my call for help,
my king and my God!
R. Lord, listen to my groaning.
At dawn I bring my plea expectantly before you.
For you, O God, delight not in wickedness;
no evil man remains with you;
the arrogant may not stand in your sight.
R. Lord, listen to my groaning.
You hate all evildoers.
You destroy all who speak falsehood;
The bloodthirsty and the deceitful
the LORD abhors.
R. Lord, listen to my groaning.

AlleluiaPS 119:105
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
A lamp to my feet is your word,
a light to my path.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMT 5:38-42
Jesus said to his disciples:
“You have heard that it was said,
An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.
But I say to you, offer no resistance to one who is evil.
When someone strikes you on your right cheek,
turn the other one to him as well.
If anyone wants to go to law with you over your tunic,
hand him your cloak as well.
Should anyone press you into service for one mile,
go with him for two miles.
Give to the one who asks of you,
and do not turn your back on one who wants to borrow.”
Prayer to make Spiritual Communion:
People who cannot communicate now make spiritual communion.At your feet, O my Jesus I bow down and offer you the repentance of my contrite heart, which abysses itself into its nothingness and Your holy presence. I adore you in the Sacrament of Your love, the ineffable Eucharist. I wish to receive you in the poor home that my heart offers you. In anticipation of the happiness of sacramental communion, I want to possess you in spirit. Come to me, oh my Jesus, that I may come to you. May Your love inflame my whole being, for life and death. I believe in you, I hope in you, I love you. So be it. Amen
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Saint June 15 : St. Germaine Cousin the Patron of Abuse Victims, #Disabled , Ugly people, and those Abandoned

St. Germaine Cousin
MYSTIC

Born:
1579, Pibrac, France
Died:
1601, Pibrac, France
Canonized:
29 June 1867 by Pope Pius IX
Patron of:
abandoned people; abuse victims; against poverty; bodily ills; child abuse victims; disabled people; girls from rural areas; handicapped people; illness; impoverishment; loss of parents; peasant girls; physically challenged people; poverty; shepherdesses; sick people; sickness; unattractive people; victims of abuse; victims of child abuse; young country girls

Born in 1579 of humble parents at Pibrac, a village about ten miles from Toulouse; died in her native place in 1601. From her birth she seemed marked out for suffering; she came into the world with a deformed hand and the disease ofscrofula, and, while yet an infant, lost her mother. Her father soon married again, but his second wife treated Germaine with much cruelty. Under pretence of saving the other children from the contagion of scrofula she persuaded the father to keep Germaine away from the homestead, and thus the child was employed almost from infancy as a shepherdess. When she returned at night, her bed was in the stable or on a litter of vine branches in a garret. In this hard school Germaine learned early to practise humility and patience. She was gifted with a marvellous sense of the presence of God and of spiritual things, so that her lonely life became to her a source of light and blessing. To poverty, bodily infirmity, the rigours of the seasons, the lack of affection from those in her own home, she added voluntary mortifications and austerities, making bread and water her daily food. Her love for Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament and for His Virgin Mother presaged the saint. She assisted daily at the Holy Sacrifice; when the bell rang, she fixed her sheep-hook or distaff in the ground, and left her flocks to the care of Providence while she heard Mass. Although the pasture was on the border of a forest infested with wolves, no harm ever came to her flocks.
She is said to have practised many austerities as a reparation for the sacrileges perpetrated by heretics in the neighbouring churches. She frequented the Sacraments of Penance and the Holy Eucharist, and it was observed that her piety increased on the approach of every feast of Our Lady. The Rosary was her only book, and her devotion to the Angelus was so great that she used to fall on her knees at the first sound of the bell, even though she heard it when crossing a stream. Whenever she could do so, she assembled the children of the village around her and sought to instil into their minds the love of Jesus and Mary. The villagers were inclined at first to treat her piety with mild derision, until certain signs of God's signal favour made her an object of reverence and awe. In repairing to the village church she had to cross a stream. The ford in winter, after heavy rains or the melting of snow, was at times impassable. On several occasions the swollen waters were seen to open and afford her a passage without wetting her garments.Notwithstanding her poverty she found means to help the poor by sharing with them her allowance of bread. Her father at last came to a sense of his duty, forbade her stepmother henceforth to treat her harshly, and wished to give her a place in the home with the other children, but she begged to be allowed to remain in thehumbler position. At this point, when men were beginning to realize the beauty of her life, God called her to Himself. One morning in the early summer of 1601, her father finding that she had not risen at the usual hour went to call her; he found her dead on her pallet of vine-twigs. She was then twenty-two years of age.

Her remains were buried in the parish church of Pibrac in front of the pulpit. In 1644, when the grave was opened to receive one of her relatives, the body of Germaine was discovered fresh and perfectly preserved, and miraculously raised almost to the level of the floor of the church. It was exposed for public view near the pulpit, until a noble lady, the wife of Fran├žois de Beauregard, presented as a thanks-offering a casket of lead to hold the remains. She had been cured of a malignant and incurable ulcer in the breast, and her infant son whose life was despaired of was restored to health on her seeking the intercession of Germaine. This was the first of a long series of wonderful cures wrought at her relics. The leaden casket was placed in the sacristy, and in 1661 and 1700 the remains were viewed and found fresh and intact by the vicars-general of Toulouse, who have left testamentary depositions of the fact. Expert medical evidence deposed that the body had not been embalmed, and experimental tests showed that the preservation was not due to any property inherent in the soil. In 1700 a movement was begun to procure the beatification of Germaine, but it fell through owing to accidental causes. In 1793 the casket  was desecrated by a revolutionary tinsmith, named Toulza, who with three accomplices took out the remains and buried them in the sacristy, throwing quick-lime and water on them. After the Revolution, her body was found to be still intact save where the quick-lime had done its work.

The private veneration of Germaine had continued from the original finding of the body in 1644, supported and encouraged by numerous cures and miracles. The cause of beatification was resumed in 1850. The documents attested more than 400 miracles or extraordinary graces, and thirty postulatory letters from archbishops and bishops in France besought the beatification from the Holy See. The miracles attested were cures of every kind (of blindness, congenital and resulting from disease, of hip and spinal disease), besides the multiplication of food for the distressed community of the Good Shepherd at Bourges in 1845. On 7 May, 1854, Pius IX proclaimed her beatification, and on 29 June, 1867, placed her on the canon of virgin saints. Her feast is kept in the Diocese of Toulouse on 15 June. She is represented in art with a shepherd's crook or with a distaff; with a watchdog, or a sheep; or with flowers in her apron.
Text from the Catholic Encyclopedia

Pope Francis says "Jesus is present in the sacrament of the Eucharist to be our..." Full Text + Video




ANGELUS
St. Peter's Square
Sunday, 14 June 2020


Dear brothers and sisters, good morning!
Today, in Italy and in other countries, the solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ , the Corpus Domini , is celebrated In today's second reading of the liturgy, St. Paul awakens our faith in this mystery of communion (cf. 1 Cor 10 : 16-17). He underlines two effects of the shared chalice and the broken bread: the mystical effect and the community effect .
At first the Apostle says: "Is not the cup of blessing that we bless communion with the blood of Christ? And isn't the bread that we break communion with the body of Christ? " (v. 16). These words express the mystical effector we can say the spiritual effect of the Eucharist: it concerns the union with Christ, who offers himself in the bread and wine for the salvation of all. Jesus is present in the sacrament of the Eucharist to be our nourishment, to be assimilated and become in us that renewing force that restores energy and restores desire to get back on the road, after every stop or after every fall. But this requires our assent, our willingness to let ourselves be transformed, our way of thinking and acting; otherwise the Eucharistic celebrations in which we participate are reduced to empty and formal rites. Many times someone goes to mass but because you have to go, as a social, respectful, but social act. But the mystery is another thing: it is Jesus present who comes to feed us.
The second effect is the community oneand it is expressed by Saint Paul with these words: "Since there is only one bread, we are, although many, one body" (v. 17). It is a question of the mutual communion of those who participate in the Eucharist, to the point of becoming a single body among them, just as the bread that is broken and distributed is unique. We are communities, nourished by the body and blood of Christ. Communion in the body of Christ is an effective sign of unity, of communion, of sharing. One cannot participate in the Eucharist without committing oneself to a mutual, sincere brotherhood. But the Lord knows well that our human strength alone is not enough for this. Indeed, he knows that among his disciples there will always be the temptation of rivalry, envy, prejudice, division ... We all know these things. This is also why he left us the Sacrament of his real Presence, concrete and permanent, so that, remaining united to him, we can always receive the gift of brotherly love. «Stay in my love» (Jn 15 : 9), said Jesus; and it is possible thanks to the Eucharist. Stay in friendship, in love.
This twofold fruit of the Eucharist: the first, the union with Christ and the second, the communion between those who feed on Him, continually generates and renews the Christian community. It is the Church that makes the Eucharist, but it is more fundamental that the Eucharist makes the Church , and allows it to be its mission , even before fulfilling it. This is the mystery of communion, of the Eucharist: to receive Jesus to transform us from within and to receive Jesus to make us unity and not division.
May the Holy Virgin help us to always accept with amazement and gratitude the great gift that Jesus has given us by leaving us the Sacrament of his Body and Blood.

After the Angelus
Dear brothers and sisters ,
I follow with great apprehension and also with pain the dramatic situation in Libya. It has been present in my prayer for the past few days. Please, I urge the international organizations and those with political and military responsibilities to relaunch with conviction and resoluteness the search for a path towards the cessation of violence, which leads to peace, stability and unity of the country. I also pray for the thousands of migrants, refugees, asylum seekers and internally displaced people in Libya. The health situation has aggravated their already precarious conditions, making them more vulnerable to forms of exploitation and violence. There is cruelty. I invite the international community, please, to take their condition to heart, identifying paths and providing means to ensure they have the protection they need, a dignified condition and a future of hope. Brothers and sisters, we all have responsibility for this, no one can feel dispensed. We all pray for Libya in silence.
Today marks World Blood Donor Day . It is an opportunity to stimulate society to be supportive and sensitive to those in need. I greet the volunteers present and express my appreciation to all those who perform this simple but very important act of helping others: donating blood.
I greet all of you, Roman faithful and pilgrims. I wish you, and those connected with the media , a good Sunday. Please don't forget to pray for me. Have a good lunch and goodbye.




Powerful Prayer to Jesus in the Eucharist - The Litany of the Blessed Sacrament to Share!

Lord, have mercy. – Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy. – Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy. – Lord, have mercy.
God our Father in heaven, – have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world, – have mercy on us.
God the Holy Spirit, – have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, one God, – have mercy on us.
Word made flesh and living among us,
– Christ, have mercy on us. (Repeat after every line)
Pure and acceptable sacrifice,
Hidden manna from above,
Living bread that came down from above,
Bread of life for a hungry world,
Chalice of blessing,
Precious blood that washes away our sins,
Memorial of God’s undying love,
Food that lasts for eternal life,
Mystery of faith,
Medicine of immortality,
Food of God’s chosen,
Perpetual presence in our tabernacles,
Viaticum of those who die in the Lord,
Pledge of future glory,
Be merciful, – Spare us, O Lord
Be merciful, – Graciously hear us, O Lord.
By the great longing you had to eat the Passover with your disciples, –
O Lord, Deliver us. (Repeat after every line)
By your humility in washing their feet,
By your loving gift of this divine sacrament,
By the five wounds of your precious body,
By your sacrificial death on the cross,
By the piercing of your Sacred Heart,
By your rising to new life,
By your gift of the Paraclete Spirit,
By your return in glory to judge the living and the dead,
(Pause for silent prayer.)
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world, – have mercy on us.
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world, – have mercy on us.
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world, – have mercy on us.
He gave them bread from heaven to be their food, – and this bread contains all goodness. Let us pray: Lord Jesus Christ, you gave us the Eucharist as the memorial of your suffering and death. May our worship of this sacrament of your Body and Blood help us to experience the salvation you won for us and the peace of your kingdom, where you live with the Father and the Holy Spirit, one God forever and ever. Amen.

At Mass, Pope Francis says "In the Eucharist, Jesus draws close to us: let us not turn away..." Full Text + Video





HOLY MASS ON THE SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY BODY AND BLOOD OF CHRIST
HOMILY OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS
Sunday, 14 June 2020


“Remember all the way which the Lord your God has led you” (Deut 8:2).  Today’s Scripture readings begin with this command of Moses: Remember!  Shortly afterwards Moses reiterates: “Do not forget the Lord, your God” (v.14).  Scripture has been given to us that we might overcome our forgetfulness of God.   How important it is to remember this when we pray!  As one of the Psalms teaches: “I will call to mind the deeds of the Lord; yes, I will remember your wonders of old” (77:11). But all those wonders too, that the Lord has worked in our own lives.
It is vital to remember the good we have received. If we do not remember it, we become strangers to ourselves, “passers-by” of existence. Without memory, we uproot ourselves from the soil that nourishes us and allow ourselves to be carried away like leaves in the wind. If we do remember, however, we bind ourselves afresh to the strongest of ties; we feel part of a living history, the living experience of a people. Memory is not something private; it is the path that unites us to God and to others. This is why in the Bible the memory of the Lord must be passed on from generation to generation. Fathers are commanded to tell the story to their sons, as we read in a beautiful passage. “When your son asks you in time to come, ‘What is the meaning of the decrees and the statutes and the ordinances which the Lord our God has commanded you?’, then you shall say to your son, ‘We were slaves… [think of the whole history of slavery!], and the Lord showed signs and wonders… before our eyes’” (Deut 6:20-22). You shall hand down this memory to your son.
But there is a problem: what if the chain of transmission of memories is interrupted? And how can we remember what we have only heard, unless we have also experienced it? God knows how difficult it is, he knows how weak our memory is, and he has done something remarkable: he left us a memorial. He did not just leave us words, for it is easy to forget what we hear. He did not just leave us the Scriptures, for it is easy to forget what we read. He did not just leave us signs, for we can forget even what we see. He gave us Food, for it is not easy to forget something we have actually tasted. He left us Bread in which he is truly present, alive and true, with all the flavour of his love. Receiving him we can say: “He is the Lord; he remembers me!” That is why Jesus told us: “Do this in remembrance of me” (1 Cor 11:24). Do! The Eucharist is not simply an act of remembrance; it is a fact: the Lord’s Passover is made present once again for us. In Mass the death and resurrection of Jesus are set before us. Do this in remembrance of me: come together and celebrate the Eucharist as a community, as a people, as a family, in order to remember me. We cannot do without the Eucharist, for it is God’s memorial. And it heals our wounded memory.
The Eucharist first heals our orphaned memory. We are living at a time of great orphanage. The Eucharist heals orphaned memory. So many people have memories marked by a lack of affection and bitter disappointments caused by those who should have given them love and instead orphaned their hearts. We would like to go back and change the past, but we cannot. God, however, can heal these wounds by placing within our memory a greater love: his own love. The Eucharist brings us the Father’s faithful love, which heals our sense of being orphans. It gives us Jesus’ love, which transformed a tomb from an end to a beginning, and in the same way can transform our lives. It fills our hearts with the consoling love of the Holy Spirit, who never leaves us alone and always heals our wounds.
Through the Eucharist, the Lord also heals our negative memory, that negativity which seeps so often into our hearts. The Lord heals this negative memory, which drags to the surface things that have gone wrong and leaves us with the sorry notion that we are useless, that we only make mistakes, that we are ourselves a mistake. Jesus comes to tell us that this is not so. He wants to be close to us. Every time we receive him, he reminds us that we are precious, that we are guests he has invited to his banquet, friends with whom he wants to dine. And not only because he is generous, but because he is truly in love with us. He sees and loves the beauty and goodness that we are. The Lord knows that evil and sins do not define us; they are diseases, infections. And he comes to heal them with the Eucharist, which contains the antibodies to our negative memory. With Jesus, we can become immune to sadness. We will always remember our failures, troubles, problems at home and at work, our unrealized dreams. But their weight will not crush us because Jesus is present even more deeply, encouraging us with his love. This is the strength of the Eucharist, which transforms us into bringers of God, bringers of joy, not negativity. We who go to Mass can ask: What is it that we bring to the world? Is it our sadness and bitterness, or the joy of the Lord? Do we receive Holy Communion and then carry on complaining, criticizing and feeling sorry for ourselves? This does not improve anything, whereas the joy of the Lord can change lives.
Finally, the Eucharist heals our closed memory. The wounds we keep inside create problems not only for us, but also for others. They make us fearful and suspicious. We start with being closed, and end up cynical and indifferent. Our wounds can lead us to react to others with detachment and arrogance, in the illusion that in this way we can control situations. Yet that is indeed an illusion, for only love can heal fear at its root and free us from the self-centredness that imprisons us. And that is what Jesus does. He approaches us gently, in the disarming simplicity of the Host. He comes as Bread broken in order to break open the shells of our selfishness. He gives of himself in order to teach us that only by opening our hearts can we be set free from our interior barriers, from the paralysis of the heart.
The Lord, offering himself to us in the simplicity of bread, also invites us not to waste our lives in chasing the myriad illusions that we think we cannot do without, yet that leave us empty within. The Eucharist satisfies our hunger for material things and kindles our desire to serve. It raises us from our comfortable and lazy lifestyle and reminds us that we are not only mouths to be fed, but also his hands, to be used to help feed others. It is especially urgent now to take care of those who hunger for food and for dignity, of those without work and those who struggle to carry on. And this we must do in a real way, as real as the Bread that Jesus gives us. Genuine closeness is needed, as are true bonds of solidarity. In the Eucharist, Jesus draws close to us: let us not turn away from those around us!
Dear brothers and sisters, let us continue our celebration of Holy Mass: the Memorial that heals our memory. Let us never forget: the Mass is the Memorial that heals memory, the memory of the heart. The Mass is the treasure that should be foremost both in the Church and in our lives. And let us also rediscover Eucharistic adoration, which continues the work of the Mass within us. This will do us much good, for it heals us within. Especially now, when our need is so great.