Friday, July 10, 2020

Holy Mass Online - Readings and Video : Saturday, July 11, 2020 - Virtual Church


Memorial of Saint Benedict, Abbot


Lectionary: 388
Reading 1IS 6:1-8
In the year King Uzziah died,
I saw the Lord seated on a high and lofty throne,
with the train of his garment filling the temple.
Seraphim were stationed above; each of them had six wings:
with two they veiled their faces,
with two they veiled their feet,
and with two they hovered aloft.

They cried one to the other,
“Holy, holy, holy is the LORD of hosts!
All the earth is filled with his glory!”
At the sound of that cry, the frame of the door shook 
(Mass Video below starts at 7:00)
and the house was filled with smoke.

Then I said, “Woe is me, I am doomed!
For I am a man of unclean lips,
living among a people of unclean lips;
yet my eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts!”
Then one of the seraphim flew to me,
holding an ember that he had taken with tongs from the altar.

He touched my mouth with it and said,
“See, now that this has touched your lips,
your wickedness is removed, your sin purged.”

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying,
“Whom shall I send? Who will go for us?”
“Here I am,” I said; “send me!”

Responsorial Psalm93:1AB, 1CD-2, 5
R. (1a) The Lord is king; he is robed in majesty.
The LORD is king, in splendor robed;
robed is the LORD and girt about with strength.
R. The Lord is king; he is robed in majesty.
And he has made the world firm,
not to be moved.
Your throne stands firm from of old;
from everlasting you are, O LORD.
R. The Lord is king; he is robed in majesty.
Your decrees are worthy of trust indeed:
holiness befits your house,
O LORD, for length of days.
R. The Lord is king; he is robed in majesty.

Alleluia1 PT 4:14
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
If you are insulted for the name of Christ, blessed are you,
for the Spirit of God rests upon you.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMT 10:24-33
Jesus said to his Apostles:
“No disciple is above his teacher,
no slave above his master.
It is enough for the disciple that he become like his teacher,
for the slave that he become like his master.
If they have called the master of the house Beelzebul,
how much more those of his household!

“Therefore do not be afraid of them.
Nothing is concealed that will not be revealed,
nor secret that will not be known.
What I say to you in the darkness, speak in the light;
what you hear whispered, proclaim on the housetops.
And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul;
rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy
both soul and body in Gehenna.
Are not two sparrows sold for a small coin?
Yet not one of them falls to the ground without your Father’s knowledge.
Even all the hairs of your head are counted.
So do not be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows.
Everyone who acknowledges me before others
I will acknowledge before my heavenly Father.
But whoever denies me before others,
I will deny before my heavenly Father.”
Prayer to make Spiritual Communion:
People who cannot communicate now make spiritual communion.At your feet, O my Jesus I bow down and offer you the repentance of my contrite heart, which abysses itself into its nothingness and Your holy presence. I adore you in the Sacrament of Your love, the ineffable Eucharist. I wish to receive you in the poor home that my heart offers you. In anticipation of the happiness of sacramental communion, I want to possess you in spirit. Come to me, oh my Jesus, that I may come to you. May Your love inflame my whole being, for life and death. I believe in you, I hope in you, I love you. So be it. Amen

Saint July 11 : St. Benedict the Founder of Western Monasticism and Patron of Fever, Monks, Temptations


St. Benedict of Nursia
FOUNDER OF WESTERN MONASTICISM
 Born: 480, Norcia (Umbria, Italy)
Died: 21 March 547 at Monte Caassino, Italy
Canonized: 1220
Major Shrine: Monte Cassino Abbey, with his burial Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, near Orléans, France Sacro Speco, at Subiaco, Italy
Patron of: Against poison, Against witchcraft, Cavers, Civil engineers, Coppersmiths, Dying people, Erysipelas, Europe, Farmers, Fever, Gall stones, Inflammatory diseases, Italian architects, Kidney disease, Monks, Nettle rash, Schoolchildren, Servants who have broken their master's belongings, Speliologists, Spelunkers, Temptations
 Founder of western monasticism, born at Nursia, c. 480; died at Monte Cassino, 543. The only authentic life of Benedict of Nursia is that contained in the second book of St. Gregory's "Dialogues". It is rather a character sketch than a biography and consists, for the most part, of a number of miraculous incidents, which, although they illustrate the life of the saint, give little help towards a chronological account of his career. St. Gregory's authorities for all that he relates were the saint's own disciples, viz. Constantinus, who succeeded him as Abbot of Monte Cassino; and Honoratus, who was Abbot of Subiaco when St. Gregory wrote his "Dialogues". Benedict was the son of a Roman noble of Nursia, a small town near Spoleto, and a tradition, which St. Bede accepts, makes him a twin with his sister Scholastica. His boyhood was spent in Rome, where he lived with his parents and attended the schools until he had reached his higher studies. Then "giving over his books, and forsaking his father's house and wealth, with a mind only to serve God, he sought for some place where he might attain to the desire of his holy purpose; and in this sort he departed [from Rome], instructed with learned ignorance and furnished with unlearned wisdom" (Dial. St. Greg., II, Introd. in Migne, P.L. LXVI). There is much difference of opinion as to Benedict's age at the time. It has been very generally stated as fourteen, but a careful examination of St. Gregory's narrative makes it impossible to suppose him younger than nineteen or twenty. He was old enough to be in the midst of his literary studies, to understand the real meaning and worth of the dissolute and licentious lives of his companions, and to have been deeply affected himself by the love of a woman (Ibid. II, 2). He was capable of weighing all these things in comparison with the life taught in the Gospels, and chose the latter, He was at the beginning of life, and he had at his disposal the means to a career as a Roman noble; clearly he was not a child, As St. Gregory expresses it, "he was in the world and was free to enjoy the advantages which the world offers, but drew back his foot which he had, as it were, already set forth in the world" (ibid., Introd.). If we accept the date 480 for his birth, we may fix the date of his abandoning the schools and quitting home at about A.D. 500. Benedict does not seem to have left Rome for the purpose of becoming a hermit, but only to find some place away from the life of the great city; moreover, he took his old nurse with him as a servant and they settled down to live in Enfide, near a church dedicated to St. Peter, in some kind of association with "a company of virtuous men" who were in sympathy with his feelings and his views of life. Enfide, which the tradition of Subiaco identifies with the modern Affile, is in the Simbrucini mountains, about forty miles from Rome and two from Subiaco. It stands on the crest of a ridge which rises rapidly from the valley to the higher range of mountains, and seen from the lower ground the village has the appearance of a fortress. As St. Gregory's account indicates, and as is confirmed by the remains of the old town and by the inscriptions found in the neighbourhood, Enfide was a place of greater importance than is the present town. At Enfide Benedict worked his first miracle by restoring to perfect condition an earthenware wheat-sifter (capisterium) which his old servant had accidentally broken. The notoriety which this miracle brought upon Benedict drove him to escape still farther from social life, and "he fled secretly from his nurse and sought the more retired district of Subiaco". His purpose of life had also been modified. He had fled Rome to escape the evils of a great city; he now determined to be poor and to live by his own work. "For God's sake he deliberately chose the hardships of life and the weariness of labour" (ibid., 1). A short distance from Enfide is the entrance to a narrow, gloomy valley, penetrating the mountains and leading directly to Subiaco. Crossing the Anio and turning to the right, the path rises along the left face oft the ravine and soon reaches the site of Nero's villa and of the huge mole which formed the lower end of the middle lake; across the valley were ruins of the Roman baths, of which a few great arches and detached masses of wall still stand. Rising from the mole upon twenty five low arches, the foundations of which can even yet be traced, was the bridge from the villa to the baths, under which the waters of the middle lake poured in a wide fall into the lake below. The ruins of these vast buildings and the wide sheet of falling water closed up the entrance of the valley to St. Benedict as he came from Enfide; today the narrow valley lies open before us, closed only by the far off mountains. The path continues to ascend, and the side of the ravine, on which it runs, becomes steeper, until we reach a cave above which the mountain now rises almost perpendicularly; while on the right hand it strikes in a rapid descent down to where, in St. Benedict's day, five hundred feet below, lay the blue waters of the lake. The cave has a large triangular-shaped opening and is about ten feet deep. On his way from Enfide, Benedict met a monk, Romanus, whose monastery was on the mountain above the cliff overhanging the cave. Romanus had discussed with Benedict the purpose which had brought him to Subiaco, and had given him the monk's habit. By his advice Benedict became a hermit and for three years, unknown to men, lived in this cave above the lake. St. Gregory tells us little of these years, He now speaks of Benedict no longer as a youth (puer), but as a man (vir) of God. Romanus, he twice tells us, served the saint in every way he could. The monk apparently visited him frequently, and on fixed days brought him food. During these three years of solitude, broken only by occasional communications with the outer world and by the visits of Romanus, he matured both in mind and character, in knowledge of himself and of his fellow-man, and at the same time he became not merely known to, but secured the respect of, those about him; so much so that on the death of the abbot of a monastery in the neighbourhood (identified by some with Vicovaro), the community came to him and begged him to become its abbot. Benedict was acquainted with the life and discipline of the monastery, and knew that "their manners were diverse from his and therefore that they would never agree together: yet, at length, overcome with their entreaty, he gave his consent" (ibid., 3). The experiment failed; the monks tried to poison him, and he returned to his cave. From this time his miracles seem to have become frequent, and many people, attracted by his sanctity and character, came to Subiaco to be under his guidance. For them he built in the valley twelve monasteries, in each of which he placed a superior with twelve monks. In a thirteenth he lived with "a few, such as he thought would more profit and be better instructed by his own presence" (ibid., 3). He remained, however, the father or abbot of all. With the establishment of these monasteries began the schools for children; and amongst the first to be brought were Maurus and Placid. The remainder of St. Benedict's life was spent in realizing the ideal of monasticism which he has left us drawn out in his Rule, and before we follow the slight chronological story given by St. Gregory, it will be better to examine the ideal, which, as St. Gregory says, is St. Benedict's real biography (ibid., 36). We will deal here with the Rule only so far as it is an element in St. Benedict's life. For the relations which it bore to the monasticism of previous centuries, and for its influence throughout the West on civil and religious government, and upon the spiritual life of Christians, the reader is referred to the articles MONASTICISM and RULE OF SAINT BENEDICT.

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Pope Francis Appoints 3 New Members to the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences established by Pope JP II


Vatican News reports that Pope appointed new Members of Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences
Pope Francis names three new members of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences, who hail from Chile, Italy, and Nigeria.
By Vatican News

Pope Francis on Friday appointed Pedro Morandé Court, from Chile; Mario Draghi, from Italy; and Kokunre Adetokunbo Agbontaen Eghafona, from Nigeria, as Ordinary Members of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences.

The Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences was established by Pope John Paul II on 1 January 1994, with the aim of promoting the study and progress of the social sciences, primarily economics, sociology, law and political science. The Academy helps offer the Church those elements which she can use in the development of her social doctrine, and reflects on the application of that doctrine in contemporary society.

Pedro Morandé Court
Professor Pedro Morandé Court was born in Santiago del Cile, Chile, on 3 August 1948. He has a degree in Sociology from the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile (UC), and a doctorate in Sociology from the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany).

He served as full Professor and then Head of the Department of Sociology (1987-1990) at UC; and later Pro-Rector (1990-1995) and Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences (1995-2014). He is currently Professor emeritus. Professor Morandé Court specialized in Sociology of Culture and Religion and Sociology of the Family, with particular regard to the Latin American people and their social history. He has published numerous articles on the family and cultural identity of Latin America.

Mario Draghi
Professor Mario Draghi was born in Rome on 13 September 1947. He graduated with a degree in Economic Policy from the Sapienza University of Rome, and obtained his doctorate in Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). In 1981 he became full Professor of Economics and Monetary Policy at the “Cesare Alfieri” Faculty of the University of Florence.

He was Executive Director of the World Bank, and later Director General of the Ministry of the Treasury of the Italian government. He was governor of the Bank of Italy from 2005-2011, and chairman of the Financial Stability Board of from 2006-2011.

In 2011 he became President of the European Central Bank, a post he held until 2019. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) and the Group of Thirty (G30). Professor Draghi is the author of numerous publications, with contributions on topics ranging from macroeconomics to the international economy and monetary policy.

Kokunre Adetokundo Agbontaen Eghafona
Professor Kokunre Adetokunbo Agbontaen Eghafona was born in London on 1 October 1959. She studied at the University of Benin, in Benin City, Nigeria, graduating with an undergraduate degree and later a Master of Arts in History. She also obtained a Master of Science in Archaeology and Anthropology from the University of Ibadan (Nigeria).

At the University of Benin, she has been a Lecturer at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology since 1992; Senior Lecturer in 1996, Associate Professor in 2003, and full Professor in 2008. She has also held a number of administrative positions including Head of the Department of Sociology (2009-2013) and Director of part-time programs (2016).

She has been responsible for sustainable development within the UN’s Sustainable Development Solutions Network (2012-2017). Professor Agbontaen Eghafona is the author of numerous academic publications. Her current scientific activities include measures to combat human trafficking in Nigeria.
Full Text Release: VaticanNews.va

President Macron of France Now wants Notre Dame Cathedral Tower to be Restored as it was before the Fire


President Macron now wants an identical replica of the Notre-Dame crossing tower.    In the debate surrounding the restoration of the world-famous Church of Notre-Dame, there was a surprising turnaround on Thursday, according the Mirror. French President Macron, who originally called for a contemporary architectural restoration, has now changed his mind and, has now spoken out in favor of an identical reconstruction of the historic crossing tower of Notre-Dame cathedral. The reasoning for Macron's change of opinion is that the majority of the French have this wish. The commission responsible for the renovation subsequently announced yesterday that everyone had voted unanimously for an identical reconstruction of the tower. According to Macron, the reconstruction should be completed in five years. 

#BreakingNews Terrorists Attack Town with Church, School, Hospital and Houses Destroyed by Fire in Mozambique


AFRICA/MOZAMBIQUE - The alarm of the missionaries: New jihadist attack in the North destroys church, hospital, houses
Friday, 10 July 2020

Maputo (Agenzia Fides) - New attack by jihadist formations in Mocímboa da Praia, in northern Mozambique. The militiamen set the local church, the Januario Pedro secondary school, the district hospital, dozens of houses, cars and shops on fire. As local sources of Fides confirm, the attack on the town, which is one of the largest centers in the province of Cabo Delgado, took place on June 27 and 28. According to the testimonies collected by Fides from missionaries and religious on the spot, who ask for anonymity for security reasons, the "rebels" attacked in force. They then burned down some buildings, freed the detainees from the local prison and even raised the black flags of the Islamic State. Mocímboa da Praia was transformed into a terrible scenario. "The armed forces reacted heavily - explain the religious -. Heavy weapons were also shot in the streets. The clash lasted several hours. At the end, the streets were full of bodies, including civilians".
The village had already been attacked in force on March 23 when, for the first time, jihadists had used modern weapons and advanced guerrilla techniques. Dom Luiz Lisboa, bishop of Pemba, said that the terrorists had promised that they would return soon. And that’s what happened.
Nobody knows for sure who these "militiamen" are. Although they define themselves as "affiliated to the Islamic State", their membership to the Caliphate is not sure. According to some analysts, behind the black flags of jihadist Islam, the interests of local crime are hidden, interested in creating a sort of "free zone" for the trade in narcotic substances from Central Asia.
Populations throughout the Cabo Delgado province are frightened. They fear these sudden and violent attacks. The missionaries on the spot tell of men, women and children who flee, without taking anything with them, seeking refuge in the woods. According to the missionaries, although the presence of law enforcement agencies has increased, armed groups in the area could organize new incursions into the region. "The fear - the religious conclude - is that they return and commit new massacres. People have already devastated physically and psychologically and may not be able to cope a new attack".
Last May the alarm was raised also by the Bishops of the Ecclesiastical Province of Nampula, in Northern Mozambique: "We are deeply concerned - they wrote - about the worsening of the situation in Cabo Delgado which has become the stage of a mysterious and incomprehensible war". (EC) (Agenzia Fides, 10/7/2020)

Turkey's Council of State Rules Ancient Christian Basilica Hagia Sophia to be Restored as a Mosque


Turkey’s Council of State rules that Hagia Sophia is a mosque

Ankara (AsiaNews) – At 4 pm today (1 pm GMT), Turkish television announced that the country’s top administrative court cleared the way for the Basilica of Saint Sophia to be restored as a mosque.

The Council of State overturned a decree issued in 1934 under then President Mustafa Kemal Atatürk that led to the transformation of the basilica - used for almost 500 years as a mosque after the fall of Constantinople (1453) – into a museum.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan had championed the legal route to invalidate the 1934 decree, thus allowing one of the most magnificent Byzantine monuments, which served as a church for more than a thousand years, to be used as a mosque.

In recent weeks, many people in Greece, Russia, the United States, as well as the ecumenical patriarch of Constantinople, Bartholomew I, had expressed opposition to turning the ancient Christian place of worship into a mosque.

It is not clear whether foreigners and Christians will be able to visit the basilica. A TV report suggested that Hagia Sophia would also remain as a museum. The basilica is a UNESCO world heritage site.

Last night, İbrahim Kalın, Turkey’s presidential spokesperson, said that opening Hagia Sophia to prayer will not hinder people visiting it, and that Turkey would preserve its Christian icons. (M.D.)
Source: AsiaNews IT Release