Wednesday, November 11, 2020

Holy Mass Online - Readings and Video : Thursday, November 12, 2020 - In Your Virtual Church



 Memorial of Saint Josaphat, Bishop and Martyr
Lectionary: 494
Reading 1
PHMN 7-20
Beloved:
I have experienced much joy and encouragement from your love,
because the hearts of the holy ones
have been refreshed by you, brother.
Therefore, although I have the full right in Christ
to order you to do what is proper,
I rather urge you out of love,
being as I am, Paul, an old man,
and now also a prisoner for Christ Jesus.
I urge you on behalf of my child Onesimus,
whose father I have become in my imprisonment,
who was once useless to you but is now useful to both you and me.
I am sending him, that is, my own heart, back to you.
I should have liked to retain him for myself,
so that he might serve me on your behalf
in my imprisonment for the Gospel,
but I did not want to do anything without your consent,
so that the good you do might not be forced but voluntary.
Perhaps this is why he was away from you for a while,
that you might have him back forever,
no longer as a slave but more than a slave, a brother,
beloved especially to me, but even more so to you,
as a man and in the Lord.
So if you regard me as a partner, welcome him as you would me.
And if he has done you any injustice
or owes you anything, charge it to me.
I, Paul, write this in my own hand: I will pay.
May I not tell you that you owe me your very self.
Yes, brother, may I profit from you in the Lord.
Refresh my heart in Christ.
Responsorial Psalm
PS 146:7, 8-9A, 9BC-10
R. (5a) Blessed is he whose help is the God of Jacob.
or:
R. Alleluia.
The LORD secures justice for the oppressed,
gives food to the hungry.
The LORD sets captives free.
R. Blessed is he whose help is the God of Jacob.
or:
R. Alleluia.
The LORD gives sight to the blind.
The LORD raises up those who were bowed down;
the LORD loves the just.
The LORD protects strangers.
R. Blessed is he whose help is the God of Jacob.
or:
R. Alleluia.
The fatherless and the widow he sustains,
but the way of the wicked he thwarts.
The LORD shall reign forever;
your God, O Zion, through all generations. Alleluia.
R. Blessed is he whose help is the God of Jacob.
or:
R. Alleluia.
 
 
Alleluia
JN 15:5
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
I am the vine, you are the branches, says the Lord:
whoever remains in me and I in him will bear much fruit.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Gospel
LK 17:20-25
Asked by the Pharisees when the Kingdom of God would come,
Jesus said in reply,
“The coming of the Kingdom of God cannot be observed,
and no one will announce, ‘Look, here it is,’ or, ‘There it is.’
For behold, the Kingdom of God is among you.”
Then he said to his disciples,
“The days will come when you will long to see
one of the days of the Son of Man, but you will not see it.
There will be those who will say to you,
‘Look, there he is,’ or ‘Look, here he is.’
Do not go off, do not run in pursuit.
For just as lightning flashes
and lights up the sky from one side to the other,
so will the Son of Man be in his day.
But first he must suffer greatly and be rejected by this generation.”
Prayer to Make a Spiritual Communion-
People who cannot communicate now make spiritual communion.
At your feet, O my Jesus I bow down and offer you the repentance of my contrite heart, which abysses itself into its nothingness and Your holy presence. I adore you in the Sacrament of Your love, the ineffable Eucharist. I wish to receive you in the poor home that my heart offers you. In anticipation of the happiness of sacramental communion, I want to possess you in spirit. Come to me, oh my Jesus, that I may come to you. May Your love inflame my whole being, for life and death. I believe in you, I hope in you, I love you. So be it. Amen
 

Saint November 12 : St. Josaphat an Archbishop and Martyr the Patron of Ukraine

ARCHBISHOP AND MARTYR

Born:
1580 at Volodymyr, Lithuania (modern Ukraine)
Died:
12 November 1623 at Vitebsk, Belarus
Canonized:
1876
Patron of:
Ukraine
Martyr, born in the little town of Volodymyr in Lithuania (Volyn) in 1580 or — according to some writers — 1584; died at Vitebsk, Russia, 12 November, 1623.
The saint's birth occurred in a gloomy period for the Ruthenian Church. Even as early as the beginning of the sixteenth century the Florentine Union had become a dead-letter; in the case of the Ruthenian Church, complete demoralization followed in the wake of its severance from Rome, and the whole body of its clergy became notorious alike for their gross ignorance and the viciousness of their lives. After the Union of Berest’ in 1596 the Ruthenian Church was divided into two contending parties — the Uniates and those who persevered in schism — each with its own hierarchy. Among the leaders of the schismatic party, who laboured to enkindle popular hatred against the Uniates, Meletius Smotryckyj was conspicuous, and the most celebrated of his victims was Josaphat.
Although of a noble Ruthenian stock, Josaphat's father had devoted himself to commercial pursuits, and held the office of town-councilor. Both parents contributed to implant the seeds of piety in the heart of their child. In the school at Volodymyr Josaphat — Johannes was the saint's baptismal name — gave evidence of unusual talent; he applied himself with the greatest zeal to the study of ecclesiastical Slav, and learned almost the entire casoslov (breviary), which from this period he began to read daily. From this source he drew his early religious education, for the unlettered clergy seldom preached or gave catechetical instruction. Owing to the straitened circumstances of his parents, he was apprenticed to the merchant Popovyc at Vilna. In this town, remarkable for the corruption of its morals and the contentions of the various religious sects, he seemed specially guarded by Providence, and became acquainted with certain excellent men (e.g. Benjamin Rutski), under whose direction he advanced in learning and in virtue.
 At the age of twenty-four (1604) he entered the Basilian monastery of the Trinity at Vilna. The fame of his virtues rapidly spread, and distinguished people began to visit him. After a notable life as a layman, Rutski also joined the order, bringing with him a wide erudition. When Josaphat reached the diaconate, regular services and labour for the salvation of souls had been already begun; the number of novices steadily increased, and under Rutski — who had meanwhile been ordained priest — there began the regeneration of religious life among the Ruthenians. In 1609, after private study under the Jesuit Fabricius, Josaphat was ordained priest. He subsequently became superior in several monasteries, and on 12 November, 1617, was reluctantly consecrated Bishop of Vitebsk, with right of succession to the Archbishopric of Polotsk. He became archbishop in 1618.
While each succeeding year saw fresh evidence of his fruitful labours, it also witnessed the steady growth of the hatred of the schismatic party. Finally on 12 November, 1623, an axe-stroke and a bullet brought Josaphat his martyr's crown. After numerous miracles had occurred, a commission was appointed by Urban VIII in 1628 to inquire into the cause of Josaphat, and examined on oath 116 witnesses. Although five years had elapsed since Josaphat's death, his body was still incorrupt. In 1637 a second commission investigated the life of the martyr, and in 1643 — twenty years after his death — Josaphat was beatified. His canonization took place in 1867.
Great were the virtues of the saint. As a boy he shunned the usual games of childhood, prayed much, and lost no opportunity of assisting at the Divine services. Children especially regarded him with the greatest affection, and found in him a worthy model. As an apprentice, he devoted every leisure hour to prayer and study. At first Popovyc viewed this behaviour with displeasure, but Josaphat gradually won such a position in his esteem, that Popovyc offered him his entire fortune and his daughter's hand. But Josaphat's love for the religious life never wavered. At first without a human guide along the paths of virtue, he received all spiritual direction immediately from the Holy Ghost.
His favourite pious exercise was to make a poklony (i.e. a reverence, in which the head touches the ground) with the ejaculation: "Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a poor sinner." Never eating meat, he fasted much, wore a hair-shirt and an angular chain, slept on the bare floor, and chastised his body until the blood flowed. The Jesuits frequently urged him to set some bounds to his austerities.
From his zealous study of the liturgical books he drew many proofs of Catholic truth, using his knowledge in the composition of several works — "On the Baptism of St. Volodymyr"; "On the Falsification of the Slavic Books by the Enemies of the Metropolitan"; "On Monks and their Vows". As deacon, priest, and bishop, he was distinguished by his extraordinary zeal in the service of souls. Not alone in the church did he preach and hear confessions, but likewise in the fields, hospitals, prisons, and even on his journeys. Even where his words of instruction might by themselves have failed, his entreaties and tears ensured him success. This zeal, united with his kindness and extraordinary love for the poor, won numbers to the Catholic Faith. Among his converts were included many important personages such as Ignatius, Patriarch of Moscow, and Emmanuel Cantacuzenus, who belonged to the family of the Greek Emperor Palæologus.
As archbishop he restored the churches; issued a catechism to the clergy with instructions that it should be learned by heart; composed rules for the priestly life, entrusting to the deacons the task of superintending their observance; assembled synods in various towns in the dioceses, and firmly opposed the Imperial Chancellor Sapieha, when he wished to make many concessions in favour of the schismatics. Throughout all his strivings and all his occupations, he continued his exemplary life as a religious, and never abated his zeal for self-mortification and prayer. He awaited death with a certain yearning, refusing to avail himself of the opportunity of flight afforded him. After his death his influence was still greater: conversions were numerous, and veneration for him continued to extend. His feast is kept on the first Sunday after 12 November, according to the Julian Calendar. Note: His feast is currently kept on November 12 on the Universal Calendar.
The Catholic Encyclopedia

Pope Francis Blesses a Statue of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal on Pilgrimage to End the Coronavirus



On November 11, 2020, Vatican News reported that Pope Francis blessed the image of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal that will go on pilgrimage in Italy against the Coronavirus.

The Holy Father Francis blessed the holy image of the Immaculate Virgin Mary of the Miraculous Medal on Wednesday 11 November in the Vatican in the presence of the superior general of the Congregation of the Mission, Fr. Tomaž Mavrič and a small delegation that organizes the Pilgrimage of Mary which visits the Communities in Italy on the occasion of the 190th anniversary of the apparitions to Saint Catherine Labouré.


In the difficult situation that the whole world is experiencing due to the Covid-19 pandemic, in a society marked by strong tensions in every continent, the spiritual children of St. Vincent de Paul begin, with the Marian pilgrimage, a path of proclamation of the merciful love of God.


It was the night between 18 and 19 July 1830 when Catherine Labouré, a young Daughter of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul, saw the Holy Virgin with whom she had a long encounter. Among the words of the Holy Virgin: “Times are very sad. Misfortunes will come upon France. The whole world will be devastated by calamities of all kinds. But you, come to the foot of this altar, here the graces will be spread over all those who request them with confidence and fervor … I have always watched over you.” Then, on 27 November 1830, Catherine Labouré saw the Holy Virgin with a small globe (representing humanity) in her hands; she contemplated her beauty and she accepted the mission of having a medal struck: “those who wear it will receive great graces!”

The Vincentians, (aka. Congregation of the Mission - an order founded by St. Vincent de Paul) faithful to the Word of God and inspired by their centuries-old charism that calls them to serve God in the poor, with the initiative of the Pilgrim Mary wish to remember that even today the Holy Virgin invites us to the foot of the altar.


Today the world is deeply troubled. Poverty is rampant, further accentuated by the pandemic, and on 15 November we will experience the IV World Day of the Poor, with the theme “Lend your hand to the poor.” In the message for that day, Pope Francis writes: “This moment we are experiencing has called many certainties into crisis. We feel poorer and weaker because we have experienced the sense of limitation and the restriction of freedom. The loss of work, of our dearest affections, as well as the lack of the usual interpersonal relationships have suddenly opened up horizons that we never used to observe. Our spiritual and material riches were questioned and we found we were afraid. Closed up in the silence of our homes, we have rediscovered how important simplicity is and keeping our eyes fixed on the essential. We have developed the need for a new fraternity, capable of mutual aid and mutual esteem.”


The Virgin of the Miraculous Medal continues today, after 190 years, to watch over the whole of humanity and comes as a pilgrim to visit and meet the ecclesial communities scattered throughout Italy thus fulfilling the promise of love contained in her Message: “I myself will be always with you… trust… don’t be discouraged.”


Mary will begin her pilgrimage on Tuesday 1 December and will last until 22 November 2021 with the following calendar:

1 December 2020 – 1 January 2021: Lazio, Marche, Umbria;

2 January – 3 February 2021: Campania;

4 February – 28 February 2021: Calabria;

1st March – 31st March 2021: Sicily;

1 April – 30 April 2021: Puglia, Basilicata and Abruzzo;

1st May – 31st May: Tuscany and Liguria;

1 – 30 June: Piedmont and Lombardy;

12 September – 13 October: Emilia Romagna and Triveneto;

19 October – 22 November: Sardinia.

Edited from a Press Release from: https://cmglobal.org/en/2020/11/06/november-11-the-pope-will-bless-the-image-of-our-lady-of-the-miraculous-medal-that-will-go-on-pilgrimage-in-italy/

Saintly Catholic Army Chaplain Fr Emil Kapaun was Awarded Medal of Honor and served as POW - Share his True Story!


Emil Joseph Kapaun was a Catholic priest and U.S. Army Chaplain born in the small Czech farming community of Pilsen, Kansas, on Holy Thursday, April 20, 1916. Growing up he was much like any other hardworking farm boy, but he was especially mindful of God and others.   At first feeling the call to become a missionary priest, under the direction of his local parish priest he decided to enter the seminary for the Diocese of Wichita and was ordained a priest on June 9, 1940. After a few years of service in the Diocese, he answered the call for chaplains during World War II and entered the U.S. Army Chaplain Corps in 1944. After traversing thousands of miles to serve the troops in Burma and India, he returned home from the service in 1946.  After two years he re-entered the Army in 1948 and was sent to Japan the following year.


In July of 1950 Chaplain Kapaun was among the first troops to be sent to help protect South Korea, which a few weeks earlier had been invaded by the North.  It was in Korea that he gained a reputation for his bravery in ministering to the soldiers in the foxholes and in the thick of battle. As Chaplain Kapaun's unit, the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, pushed it's way up towards the northern border of North Korea, it was ambushed by the large Chinese Army that was just entering the war.  Here, at the Battle of Unsan, on November 2, Kapaun once again traversed all over the ragged battlefield to rescue men or give them Last Rites.  He showed his dedication to his "boys" as he chose to remain with a number of wounded men rather than escape.  Captured by the enemy, they were forced to march over 60 miles to the prison camp in the bitter cold.  Along the way, Father Kapaun carried his wounded comrades and encouraged them to do likewise. In the seven months in prison, Father Kapaun spent himself in heroic service to his fellow prisoners without regard for race, color or creed, giving them help and hope when they needed it most.
To this there is testimony of men of all faiths. Ignoring his own ill health, he nursed the sick and wounded, stole food for the hungry, picked lice off of men, washed dirty and soiled clothing, and encouraged men with words and prayers to keep fighting because they would eventually make it out of the camp.  Finally a blood clot in his leg and pneumonia prevented his daily rounds. Moved to a so-called hospital, but denied medical assistance, his death soon followed on May 23, 1951.  Two years later several hundred Prisoners of War were released, including some that carried with them a beautiful crucifix that was carved by a Jewish POW who was inspired by tales of Father Kapaun's deeds.  These Prisoners testified to Father Kapaun's role in their survival and began to tell the world about their heroic chaplain.
On April 11, 2013, Chaplain Kapaun was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Barack Obama.  Only one of 5 chaplains to receive the nation's highest award, he is also the most decorated chaplain in U.S. history.  The Church continues to seek honors for Father Kapaun, as the Diocese of Wichita and the Vatican have begun the formal process that could lead to Father Kapaun's Canonization as a saint. In 1993, it was announced that Father Kapaun would receive the title of "Servant of God".  In late 2015, the "Positio" on his life and virtues was presented to the Congregation for Saints at the Vatican, which began to review it in 2016.  If the Congregation and the Holy Father declare that Kapaun lived with certainty a life of Heroic Virtue, he will be given the title "Venerable", and the door will be opened to review the potential miracle attributed to his intercession needed for his Beatification.  After this takes place, another miracle will be required for his Canonization.
We hope that you are as inspired by Father Kapaun's life and example as we are, and that you join us in praying for his Beatification and Canonization.  
Text Source: http://fatherkapaun.org - Images source Google Images

Pope Francis Explains "Prayer is like the oxygen of life." FULL TEXT + Video at Audience from Vatican


GENERAL AUDIENCE
Library of the Apostolic Palace
Wednesday, 11 November 2020


 Catechesis on prayer - 14. The persevering prayer

Dear Brothers and sisters, good morning!

We continue the catechesis on prayer. Someone said to me: “You talk too much about prayer. It is not necessary”. Yes, it is necessary. Because if we do not pray, we will not have the strength to go forward in life. Prayer is like the oxygen of life. Prayer draws down on us the Holy Spirit’s presence who always leads us forward. For this reason, I speak a lot about prayer.

Jesus has given an example of continual prayer, practiced perseveringly. Constant dialogue with His Father, in silence and in recollection, was the fulcrum of His entire mission. The Gospels also report His exhortations to the disciples, so that they might pray insistently, without getting tired. The Catechism recalls three parables contained in the Gospel of Luke that underline this characteristic of Jesus’s prayer (see CCC, 2613).

First of all, prayer must be tenacious: like the person in the parable who, having to welcome a guest who arrived unexpectedly in the middle of the night, goes to knock on the door of a friend and asks him for some bread. The friend responds, “No!”, because he is already in bed – but he insists and insists until he constrains his friend to get up and give him some bread (see Lk 11:5-8). A tenacious request. But God is more patient with us, and the person who knocks with faith and perseverance on the door of His heart will not be disappointed. God always responds. Always. Our Father knows well what we need; insistence is necessary not to inform Him or to convince Him, but is necessary to nurture the desire and expectation in us.

The second parable is that of the widow who goes to the judge for his help in obtaining justice. This judge is corrupt, he is a man without scruples, but in the end, exasperated by the insistence of the widow, decides to please her (see Lk 18:1-8)… He thought: “But, it is better to resolve this problem and get her off my back so she will not continue coming to me to complain”. This parable makes us understand that faith is not a momentary choice, but a courageous disposition to call on God, even to “argue” with Him, without resigning oneself to evil and injustice.

The third parable presents a pharisee and a publican who go to the Temple to pray. The first turns to God boasting of his merits; the other feels unworthy even to enter the sanctuary. While God does not listen to the prayer of the first, that is of those who are proud, He does grant the prayer of the humble (see Lk 18:9-14). There is no true prayer without a spirit of humility. It is specifically humility that leads us to ask in prayer.

The teaching of the Gospel is clear: we need to pray always, even when everything seems in vain, when God appears to be deaf and mute and it seems we are wasting time. Even if heaven is overshadowed, the Christian does not stop praying. A Christian’s prayer keeps stride with his or her faith. There are many days of our life when faith seems to be an illusion, a sterile exertion. There are moments of darkness in our life, and in those moments, faith may seem to be an illusion. But the practice of prayer means accepting even this exertion. “Father, I pray and do not feel anything … It feels like my heart is dry, that my heart is arid”. But we must continue exerting ourselves in the tough moments, the moments in which we feel nothing. Many saints experienced the night of faith and God’s silence – when we know and God does not respond – and these saints were persevering.

During those nights of faith, the one who prays is never alone. Jesus, in fact, is not only a witness and teacher of prayer; He is more. He welcomes us in His prayer so that we might pray in Him and through Him. This is the work of the Holy Spirit. For this reason, the Gospel invites us to pray to the Father in Jesus’s name. Saint John provides these words of the Lord: “Whatever you ask in my name, I will do it, that the Father may be glorified in the Son” (14:13). And the Catechism explains that “the certitude that our petitions will be heard is founded on the prayer of Jesus” (n. 2614). It gives the wings that the human person’s prayer has always desired to possess.

How can we fail to recall here the words of Psalm 91, laden with trust, springing from a heart that hopes for everything from God: “he will cover you with his pinions, and under his wings you will find refuge; his faithfulness is a shield and buckler. You will not fear the terror of the night, nor the arrow that flies by day, nor the pestilence that stalks in darkness, nor the destruction that wastes at noonday” (vv. 4-6). It is in Christ that this stupendous prayer is fulfilled, and in Him that it finds its complete truth. Without Jesus, our prayer risks being reduced to human effort, destined most of the time to failure. But He has taken on Himself every cry, every groan, every jubilation, every supplication…every human prayer. And let us not forget that the Holy Spirit prays in us; it is He who leads us to pray, who leads us to Jesus. He is the gift that the Father and the Son gave us to foster an encounter with God. And when we pray, it is the Holy Spirit who prays in our hearts.

Christ is everything for us, even in our prayer life. Saint Augustine said this with an enlightening expression that we also find in the Catechism: Jesus “prays for us as our priest, prays in us as our Head, and is prayed to by us as our God. Therefore let us acknowledge our voice in him and his in us” (n. 2616). This is why the Christian who prays fears nothing, he or she trusts in the Holy Spirit who was given to us as a gift and who prays in us, eliciting prayer. May the Holy Spirit, Teacher of prayer, teach us the path of prayer.


APPEAL

 

Yesterday, the Report on the sad case of former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick was published. I renew my closeness to the victims of sexual abuse and the Church's commitment to eradicate this evil.


Special Greetings

I cordially greet the English-speaking faithful. In this month of November, let us pray especially for our deceased loved ones, and for all who have died, that the Lord in his mercy will welcome them to the banquet of eternal life. Upon you and your families I invoke the joy of our Lord Jesus Christ. God bless you!


Summary of the Holy Father's words:

Dear Brothers and Sisters, in our catechesis on prayer, we have seen that Jesus prayed to his Father with perseverance. Three parables in Luke’s Gospel emphasize how we too need to be constant in our prayer. The first parable, in which a man asks for help from a friend in the middle of the night and does not give up until his friend responds, teaches us the need to pray with insistence. In the second parable we see in the widow who persists in asking the unrighteous judge for justice, the importance of patience. The third parable, that of the publican and the Pharisee at prayer in the Temple, reveals that God responds to those who pray with humility. We see these three attitudes – insistence, patience and humility – reflected in the saints who persevered in prayer through moments of darkness when God seemed to be silent or absent. May we continue to persevere in prayer conscious that we never pray alone, but with Christ himself, in the power of the Holy Spirit. As Saint Augustine succinctly puts it: Jesus “prays for us as our priest, he prays in us as our Head, and as our God he is the one to whom we pray” (cf. CCC, 2616). 

Image Source: Screen Shot Vatican.va - https://press.vatican.va/content/salastampa/it/bollettino/pubblico/2020/11/11/0583/01351.html

What is Veterans' or Remembrance Day - 5 things to SHARE - Wear a #Poppy and Prayers to Say!


1. On November 11, many people wear a red poppy in memory of the war veterans and victims. It was at 11 o'clock on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918 that the Armistice was signed signaling the end of World War I. 
2. At that point the guns stopped after 4 years of war. 
3.Remembrance Day was instituted by King George the V in 1919 and is celebrated in Commonwealth countries. In the USA it is celebrated as Veteran's Day. 
4.The red from the Poppy flower, which grew over several battlefields, sybolized the blood shed by the troops. 
5. The Poppy comes from the famous poem of remembrance: (IMAGE SOURCE : THE GUARDIAN/GOOGLE)
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

- John McCrae
Let us pray for these victims and all victims of war. May we learn to live in peace with one another and with God.
FROM USCCB OFFICIAL PRAYERS FOR WAR 

Prayers in a Time of War

  1. For Troops
    All-powerful and ever-living God,
    when Abraham left his native land
    and departed from his people
    you kept him safe through all his journeys.
    Protect these soldiers.
    Be their constant companion and their strength in battle,
    their refuge in every adversity.
    Guide them, O Lord, that they may return home in safety.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.
  2. Prayer of a Spouse for a Soldier
    God of power and might,
    at every moment and in every place
    you are near to those who call upon your name in faith.
    In marriage you have blessed us with a share in your divine love.
    Look upon my husband/wife and keep him/her in your safekeeping,
    no matter where the road may lead.
    And when the battle is ended,
    bring him/her safely home to those who love him.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.
  3. Prayer of a Parent for a Soldier
    Father all-powerful and ever-loving God,
    from before we were born,
    your love has nurtured and sustained us.
    Hear my prayer for N., my son/daughter.
    Keep him/her safe in time of battle
    and faithful to you, day in and day out.
    Bring him/her safely home to those who love him/her.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.
  4. For Government Leaders
    God of power and might, wisdom and justice,
    through you authority is rightly administered,
    laws are enacted, and judgment is decreed.
    Assist with your spirit of counsel and fortitude
    the President and other government leaders of these United States.
    May they always seek
    the ways of righteousness, justice and mercy.
    Grant that they may be enabled by your powerful protection
    to lead our country with honesty and integrity.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.
  5. For the Safety of Soldiers
    Almighty and eternal God,
    those who take refuge in you will be glad
    and forever will shout for joy.
    Protect these soldiers as they discharge their duties.
    Protect them with the shield of your strength
    and keep them safe from all evil and harm.
    May the power of your love enable them to return home
    in safety, that with all who love them,
    they may ever praise you for your loving care.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.
  6. For our Enemies
    Jesus, Prince of Peace,
    you have asked us to love our enemies
    and pray for those who persecute us.
    We pray for our enemies and those who oppose us.
    With the help of the Holy Spirit,
    may all people learn to work together
    for that justice which brings true and lasting peace.
    To you be glory and honor for ever and ever.
  7. For Deceased Veterans
  8. O God, by whose mercy the faithful departed find rest,
  9. look kindly on your departed veterans who gave their
    lives in the service of their country.
    Grant that through the passion, death, and resurrection of your Son
    they may share in the joy of your heavenly kingdom
    and rejoice in you with your saints forever.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.