Thursday, November 26, 2020

Holy Mass Online - Readings and Video : Friday, November 27, 2020 - #Eucharist in Your Virtual Church



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 Friday of the Thirty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 507
Reading 1
RV 20:1-4, 11—21:2
I, John, saw an angel come down from heaven,
holding in his hand the key to the abyss and a heavy chain.
He seized the dragon, the ancient serpent,
which is the Devil or Satan,
and tied it up for a thousand years and threw it into the abyss,
which he locked over it and sealed,
so that it could no longer lead the nations astray
until the thousand years are completed.
After this, it is to be released for a short time.
Then I saw thrones; those who sat on them were entrusted with judgment.
I also saw the souls of those who had been beheaded
for their witness to Jesus and for the word of God,
and who had not worshiped the beast or its image
nor had accepted its mark on their foreheads or hands.
They came to life and they reigned with Christ for a thousand years.
Next I saw a large white throne and the one who was sitting on it.
The earth and the sky fled from his presence
and there was no place for them.
I saw the dead, the great and the lowly, standing before the throne,
and scrolls were opened.
Then another scroll was opened, the book of life.
The dead were judged according to their deeds,
by what was written in the scrolls.
The sea gave up its dead;
then Death and Hades gave up their dead.
All the dead were judged according to their deeds.
Then Death and Hades were thrown into the pool of fire.
(This pool of fire is the second death.)
Anyone whose name was not found written in the book of life
was thrown into the pool of fire.
Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth.
The former heaven and the former earth had passed away,
and the sea was no more.
I also saw the holy city, a new Jerusalem,
coming down out of heaven from God,
prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.
 
Responsorial Psalm
PS 84:3, 4, 5-6A AND 8A
R. (Rev. 21:3b) Here God lives among his people.
My soul yearns and pines 
for the courts of the LORD.
My heart and my flesh
cry out for the living God.
R. Here God lives among his people.
Even the sparrow finds a home,
and the swallow a nest
in which she puts her young–
Your altars, O LORD of hosts,
my king and my God!
R. Here God lives among his people.
Blessed they who dwell in your house!
continually they praise you.
Blessed the men whose strength you are!
They go from strength to strength.
R. Here God lives among his people.
 
 
Alleluia
LUKE 21:28
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Stand erect and raise your heads
because your redemption is at hand.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Gospel
LK 21:29-33
Jesus told his disciples a parable.
“Consider the fig tree and all the other trees.
When their buds burst open,
you see for yourselves and know that summer is now near;
in the same way, when you see these things happening,
know that the Kingdom of God is near.
Amen, I say to you, this generation will not pass away
until all these things have taken place.
Heaven and earth will pass away, 
but my words will not pass away.”
Prayer to Make a Spiritual Communion-
People who cannot communicate now make spiritual communion.
At your feet, O my Jesus I bow down and offer you the repentance of my contrite heart, which abysses itself into its nothingness and Your holy presence. I adore you in the Sacrament of Your love, the ineffable Eucharist. I wish to receive you in the poor home that my heart offers you. In anticipation of the happiness of sacramental communion, I want to possess you in spirit. Come to me, oh my Jesus, that I may come to you. May Your love inflame my whole being, for life and death. I believe in you, I hope in you, I love you. So be it. Amen

Saint November 27 : St Virgilius a Benedictine Bishop and famous Scientist who was know as the "Geometer"

St. Virgilius
BENEDICTINE BISHOP 
 Born: 8th century Ireland
Died:784 at Salzburg, Austria
Canonized:10 June 1233 by Pope Gregory IX
Patron of:Salzburg, Austria; Slovene

Virgilius was a scientist before his time, and in his monastery of Aghaboe in Ireland he was known as "the Geometer" because of his knowledge of geography. In 743, he left Ireland for a pilgrimage to the Holy Land but got no farther than the court of Pepin, the father of Charlemagne. In 745, Pepin defeated Odilo, duke of Bavaria, and sent St. Virgilius to be abbot of the monastery of Sankt Peter and in charge of the diocese of Salzburg.
In accordance with the Irish custom, the bishop was subject to the abbot, who was the real head of the diocese. This was contrary to continental custom, and so Virgilius consented to be consecrated bishop. His most notable accomplishment was the conversion of the Alpine Slavs; moreover, he sent missionaries into Hungary.
In his first days at Salzburg, he was involved in controversies with St. Boniface, one over the form of baptism, which the pope decided in Virgilius's favor. Virgilius also expressed a number of opinions on astronomy, geography, and anthropology, which to Boniface smacked of novelty, if not heresy. He reported these views to Rome, and the pope demanded an investigation of the bishop of Salzburg. Nothing came of this and apparently Virgilius was able to defend his views.
Virgilius built a grand cathedral at Salzburg, baptized the Slavic dukes of Carinthia, and sent missionaries into lands where no missionary had yet gone. Returning from a preaching mission to a distant part of his diocese, he fell sick and died on November 27, 784. When the Salzburg cathedral was destroyed by a fire in 1181, the grave of Virgilius was discovered and this led to his canonization by Pope Gregory IX in 1233.
His feast is kept throughout Ireland and in the diocese of Salzburg.
SOURCE: the Catholic Encyclopedia


#BreakingNews US Supreme Court Says Gov. Cuomo Cannot Limit Attendance in Places of Worship - FULL TEXT



Late on November 25, 2020, the Supreme Court of the United States issued an opinion in the case of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn, New York vs. Andrew Cuomo, Governor of New York. The 5 to 4 decision pertains to the state’s ability to restrict capacity in houses of worship.

See: http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/20pdf/20a87_4g15.pdf

In keeping with the Diocese’s priority to mitigate risk of infection and protect those most vulnerable, parishes must continue to:

  • Follow all CDC guidelines and advice of medical professionals, including continuing to observe six foot physical distance;
  • Continue to require the use of face masks at all liturgies and follow other well-established diocesan policies for the celebration of Masses.

Individual parish capacity will be determined by the size of the worship space and the required social distance requirements. The dispensation regarding the obligation to attend Sunday Mass and other Days of Holy Obligation is still effect. Those wishing to attend liturgy in person are obligated to maintain six feet social distance from others while in attendance.The Diocese’s guidelines for parishes can be found at:http://www.buffalodiocese.org/coronavirus

Apostollic Administrator Bishop Edward B. Scharfenberger welcomes this ruling.  “We have an obligation to do everything we can to protect one another from the threat that the coronavirus poses.  At the same time, we welcome this decision that upholds the First Amendment’s ‘free exercise’ clause.  Food and drink for the soul are as essential as food and drink for the stomach.”

FULL TEXT Press Release: https://wnycatholic.org/2020/11/26/covid-19-update-supreme-court-ruling/

Wow 5 Things to SHARE about the 1st American Thanksgiving it was a Mass! - #HappyThanksgiving!

A historical reality is that the first “thanksgiving” meal in the United States was celebrated by Spanish settlers, in what became Florida. This was explained by Historian Dr. Michael Gannon as he wrote about what occurred on September 8, 1565.
1. “When the first Spanish settlers landed in what is now St. Augustine on September 8, 1565, to build a settlement, their first act was to hold a religious service to thank God for the safe arrival of the Spanish. FIRST they Celebrated the Holy Mass, Father Francisco Lopez, the Chaplin of the Spanish ships, insisted that the natives from the Timucua tribe be fed with the Spanish settlers. This was the very first Thanksgiving and the first Thanksgiving meal in the United States.
2. The Spaniards, with food that they brought with them on the ship, made the communal meal. History tells us that  the meal probably involved salted pork, garbanzo beans, bread and red wine.

3. This account of the first “thanksgiving” was found in Father Francisco’s memoirs. He wrote, “the feast day [was] observed . . . after Mass, ‘the Adelantado [Menendez] had the Indians fed and dined himself.’”
4. The feast celebrated by the Spaniards was that of the Blessed Virgin Mary’s birthday, on  September 8. The meal “may have also included … If the Timucua contributed, it would likely have been with corn, fresh fish, berries, or beans.”
5. Before the Mass was celebrated, “Father Francisco López, the fleet chaplain…came ashore and met Menéndez holding a cross… Menéndez came on land, knelt and kissed the cross.”
The word Eucharist another word for the Mass comes from the Greek meaning “thanksgiving”)
HAPPY THANKSGIVING and Remember to THANK GOD with your Family! 
 Thanksgiving Day Prayer : Lord, we thank you for the goodness of our people and for the spirit of justice that fills this nation. We thank you for the beauty and fullness of the land and the challenge of the cities. We thank you for our work and our rest, for one another, and for our homes. We thank you, Lord: accept our thanksgiving on this day. We pray and give thanks through Jesus Christ our Lord. R: Amen. —from Catholic Household Blessings and Prayers. (USCCB)