Thursday, February 18, 2021

Lent Message from Archbishop Martin of Ireland "...over the next 40 days, our spiritual conversion can be nourished by daily actions, thoughts, prayers and words." FULL TEXT


Faith, Hope and Love – Lent in a time of pandemic: Archbishop Eamon Martin  

Archbishop Eamon Martin has said that while Ash Wednesday 2021 will be mostly without ashes, he is encouraging families to pray together, fast and be generous this Lent.  Archbishop Martin was speaking ahead of Ash Wednesday, tomorrow, as he launched the #LivingLent initiative on Twitter and Instagram for Lent 2021.  #LivingLent invites the faithful to use social media to grow closer to God during this sacred season. 

Archbishop Eamon said, “The season of Lent is a forty day penitential period leading up to Holy Week and Easter when Christians mark the crucifixion, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.  For Catholics the beginning of  Lent is traditionally marked by a day of fasting and by the distribution of ashes on the foreheads of church-goers.  Believers are encouraged to make a commitment to prayer, charity and fasting or self-denial.  Many Catholics make Lenten promises or resolutions to mark the importance of this holy season.

“This year, with the strong ‘Stay at Home’ message from public health authorities, north and south, it will not be possible for Catholics to gather in Church buildings to receive the ashes, which are normally applied to the forehead in the shape of the Sign of the Cross.  The words used in the blessing are ‘Remember that you are dust and to dust you shall return’, or ‘Repent and believe in the Gospel’.  At this time when gathering for public worship is suspended, parishes will continue to mark Ash Wednesday using online services over webcam, and also by encouraging family prayer services in the home.  Instead of the usual ashes, families are being encouraged to keep the fast, to make their normal Lenten promises.

“Some parishes are making small envelopes of blessed ashes available for those who will be visiting their parish churches in the early days of Lent for individual prayer.  People will also be able to collect their ‘Trócaire Box’ from parishes in the same way.  In some parts of the world, where there are less restrictions on gathering for worship, the Vatican has asked that ashes would not be applied to the forehead in the usual manner, but would be sprinkled on the top of people’s heads

Archbishop Eamon said, “As we prepare for Easter over the next 40 days, our spiritual conversion can be nourished by daily actions, thoughts, prayers and words.  During Lent we also offer a particular sacrifice in our personal lives to help strengthen our relationship with the all-merciful Lord.  In his message for Lent 2021, Pope Francis is inviting the faithful to ‘renew our faith, draw from the living waters of hope, and receive with open hearts the love of God.’

“I invite everyone to read the Holy Father’s short Lenten message and to avail of our #LivingLent initiative on Twitter and Instagram, and online resources on catholicbishops.ie which offer suggestions for fasting, prayer and charity – the three pillars of the Lenten season – and support to observe Lent at home.  Our Lenten digital initiative seeks to assist our spiritual preparation for the joy and hope of the Easter season.”

Notes to Editors 

  • The #LivingLent initiative offers short daily suggestions on Twitter and Instagram.  These include prayer and Scripture reading suggestions; opportunities for penance and fasting in our daily lives, such as to refrain  from gossip; fast from negativity online; give up certain foods; availing of the Sacrament of Reconciliation/Confession; suggestions for charitable acts like donating to Trócaire and other charities; and donating your time by helping your own family, school, parish.  Hashtag #LivingLent can be used and shared to help put themes of prayer, fasting and charity into practice during this Lenten season.
  • Archbishop Eamon Martin is Archbishop of Armagh, Apostolic Administrator for the Diocese of Dromore and chair of the Communications Council of the Irish Catholic Bishops’ Conference.
  • See catholicbishops.ie for the text of the message of Pope Francis for Lent 2021; for Lenten resources; and, for links to the #LivingLent initiative on social media.
  • The liturgical season of Lent

Ash Wednesday is a day of fast and abstinence for Christians.  For the believer Lent is the time of preparation for Easter and it commemorates the forty days which, according to the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, Jesus spent fasting in the desert before beginning His public ministry where He endured temptation.  In Lent – through prayer, penance (including participating in the Sacrament of Reconciliation/Confession), acts of charity and self-denial – we are called to renewal of our Christian life in preparation for Easter:

Prayer

The Stations of the Cross, a devotional commemoration of Christ’s carrying the Cross and of His execution, are often observed.  As well as giving something up it is becoming more common to take something up as well and this may include taking time to volunteer, or spending more time in prayer.

Fasting and Penance

Penance is an essential part of the lives of all Christ’s faithful.  It arises from the Lord’s call to conversation and repentance. Christians undertake penance: in memory of the Passion and death of Jesus; as a sharing in Christ’s suffering; as an expression of inner conversion; as a form of reparation for sin. 

Charity

Traditionally during Lent many of the faithful commit to fasting or giving up certain types of luxuries as a form of penitence, the money saved from this can be donated to charity, for example, contributing to their Trócaire box.        

FULL TEXT Release: https://www.catholicbishops.ie/    

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