Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Saint January 21 : St. Agnes : Patron of Engaged Couples; Chastity; Gardeners; Girls; Rape Victims; Virgins

Born:
291
Died:
304
Major Shrine::
Church of Sant'Agnese fuori le mura and the Church of Sant'Agnese in Agone, both in Rome
Patron of:
Betrothed couples; chastity; Children of Mary; Colegio Capranica of Rome; crops; gardeners; Girl Scouts; girls; rape victims; virgins
Of all the virgin martyrs of Rome none was held in such high honour by the primitive church, since the fourth century, as St. Agnes. In the ancient Roman calendar of the feasts of the martyrs (Depositio Martyrum), incorporated into the collection of Furius Dionysius Philocalus, dating from 354 and often reprinted, e.g. in Ruinart [Acta Sincera Martyrum (ed. Ratisbon, 1859), 63 sqq.], her feast is assigned to 21 January, to which is added a detail as to the name of the road (Via Nomentana) near which her grave was located. The earliest sacramentaries give the same date for her feast, and it is on this day that the Latin Church even now keeps her memory sacred. Since the close of the fourth century the Fathers of the Church and Christian poets have sung her praises and extolled her virginity and heroism under torture. It is clear, however, from the diversity in the earliest accounts that there was extant at the end of the fourth century no accurate and reliable narrative, at least in writing, concerning the details of her martyrdom. On one point only is there mutual agreement, viz., the youth of the Christian heroine. St. Ambrose gives her age as twelve (De Virginibus, I, 2; P.L., XVI, 200-202: Haec duodecim annorum martyrium fecisse traditur), St. Augustine as thirteen (Agnes puella tredecim annorum; Sermo cclxxiii, 6, P.L., XXXVIII, 1251), which harmonizes well with the words of Prudentius: Aiunt jugali vix habilem toro (Peristephanon, Hymn xiv, 10 in Ruinart, Act. Sinc., ed cit. 486). Damasus depicts her as hastening to martyrdom from the lap of her mother or nurse (Nutricis gremium subito liquisse puella; in St. Agneten, 3, ed. Ihm, Damasi epigrammata, Leipzig, 1895, 43, n. 40). We have no reason whatever for doubting this tradition. It indeed explains very well the renown of the youthful martyr. Catholic Encyclopedia 
________________________________ __________________________ 
Prayer in Honor of St. Agnes 
O Sweetest Lord Jesus Christ, source of all virtues, lover of virgins, most powerful conqueror of demons, most severe extirpator of vice! deign to cast Thine eyes upon my weakness, and through the intercession of Mary most blessed, Mother and Virgin, and of Thy beloved spouse St. Agnes, glorious virgin and martyr, grant me the aid of Thy heavenly grace, in order that I may learn to despise all earthly things, and to love what is heavenly; to oppose vice and to be proof against temptation; to walk firmly in the path of virtue, not to seek honors, to shun pleasures, to bewail my past offenses, to keep far from the occasions of evil, to keep free from bad habits, to seek the company of the good, and persevere in righteousness, so that, by the assistance of Thy grace, I may deserve the crown of eternal life, together with St. Agnes and all the saints, forever and ever, in Thy kingdom. Amen. (Indulgence 100 days, Pius IX, 1854)

US Bishops' President's Statement on Inauguration of Joe Biden Warns "Abortion is a direct attack on life" Official FULL TEXT



USCCB President's Statement on the Inauguration of Joseph R. Biden, Jr., as 46th President of the United States of America 
JANUARY 20, 2021
Statement on the Inauguration of Joseph R. Biden, Jr., as 46th President of the United States of America from Most Reverend José H. Gomez, Archbishop of Los Angeles, President, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.
My prayers are with our new President and his family today.

I am praying that God grant him wisdom and courage to lead this great nation and that God help him to meet the tests of these times, to heal the wounds caused by this pandemic, to ease our intense political and cultural divisions, and to bring people together with renewed dedication to America’s founding purposes, to be one nation under God committed to liberty and equality for all.

Catholic bishops are not partisan players in our nation’s politics. We are pastors responsible for the souls of millions of Americans and we are advocates for the needs of all our neighbors. In every community across the country, Catholic parishes, schools, hospitals, and ministries form an essential culture of compassion and care, serving women, children, and the elderly, the poor and sick, the imprisoned, the migrant, and the marginalized, no matter what their race or religion.

When we speak on issues in American public life, we try to guide consciences, and we offer principles.  These principles are rooted in the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the social teachings of his Church. Jesus Christ revealed God’s plan of love for creation and revealed the truth about the human person, who is created in God’s image, endowed with God-given dignity, rights and responsibilities, and called to a transcendent destiny.

Based on these truths, which are reflected in the Declaration of Independence and Bill of Rights, the bishops and Catholic faithful carry out Christ’s commandment to love God and love our neighbors by working for an America that protects human dignity, expands equality and opportunities for every person, and is open-hearted towards the suffering and weak.

For many years now, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops has tried to help Catholics and others of good will in their reflections on political issues through a publication we call Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship. The most recent edition addresses a wide range of concerns. Among them: abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, immigration, racism, poverty, care for the environment, criminal justice reform, economic development, and international peace.

On these and other issues, our duty to love and our moral principles lead us to prudential judgments and positions that do not align neatly with the political categories of left or right or the platforms of our two major political parties. We work with every President and every Congress. On some issues we find ourselves more on the side of Democrats, while on others we find ourselves standing with Republicans. Our priorities are never partisan. We are Catholics first, seeking only to follow Jesus Christ faithfully and to advance his vision for human fraternity and community.

I look forward to working with President Biden and his administration, and the new Congress. As with every administration, there will be areas where we agree and work closely together and areas where we will have principled disagreement and strong opposition.

Working with President Biden will be unique, however, as he is our first president in 60 years to profess the Catholic faith. In a time of growing and aggressive secularism in American culture, when religious believers face many challenges, it will be refreshing to engage with a President who clearly understands, in a deep and personal way, the importance of religious faith and institutions. Mr. Biden’s piety and personal story, his moving witness to how his faith has brought him solace in times of darkness and tragedy, his longstanding commitment to the Gospel’s priority for the poor — all of this I find hopeful and inspiring.

At the same time, as pastors, the nation’s bishops are given the duty of proclaiming the Gospel in all its truth and power, in season and out of season, even when that teaching is inconvenient or when the Gospel’s truths run contrary to the directions of the wider society and culture. So, I must point out that our new President has pledged to pursue certain policies that would advance moral evils and threaten human life and dignity, most seriously in the areas of abortion, contraception, marriage, and gender. Of deep concern is the liberty of the Church and the freedom of believers to live according to their consciences.

Our commitments on issues of human sexuality and the family, as with our commitments in every other area — such as abolishing the death penalty or seeking a health care system and economy that truly serves the human person — are guided by Christ’s great commandment to love and to stand in solidarity with our brothers and sisters, especially the most vulnerable.

For the nation’s bishops, the continued injustice of abortion remains the “preeminent priority.” Preeminent does not mean “only.” We have deep concerns about many threats to human life and dignity in our society. But as Pope Francis teaches, we cannot stay silent when nearly a million unborn lives are being cast aside in our country year after year through abortion.

Abortion is a direct attack on life that also wounds the woman and undermines the family. It is not only a private matter, it raises troubling and fundamental questions of fraternity, solidarity, and inclusion in the human community. It is also a matter of social justice. We cannot ignore the reality that abortion rates are much higher among the poor and minorities, and that the procedure is regularly used to eliminate children who would be born with disabilities.

Rather than impose further expansions of abortion and contraception, as he has promised, I am hopeful that the new President and his administration will work with the Church and others of good will. My hope is that we can begin a dialogue to address the complicated cultural and economic factors that are driving abortion and discouraging families. My hope, too, is that we can work together to finally put in place a coherent family policy in this country, one that acknowledges the crucial importance of strong marriages and parenting to the well-being of children and the stability of communities. If the President, with full respect for the Church’s religious freedom, were to engage in this conversation, it would go a long way toward restoring the civil balance and healing our country’s needs.

President Biden’s call for national healing and unity is welcome on all levels. It is urgently needed as we confront the trauma in our country caused by the coronavirus pandemic and the social isolation that has only worsened the intense and long-simmering divisions among our fellow citizens.

As believers, we understand that healing is a gift that we can only receive from the hand of God. We know, too, that real reconciliation requires patient listening to those who disagree with us and a willingness to forgive and move beyond desires for reprisal. Christian love calls us to love our enemies and bless those who oppose us, and to treat others with the same compassion that we want for ourselves. 

We are all under the watchful eye of God, who alone knows and can judge the intentions of our hearts. I pray that God will give our new President, and all of us, the grace to seek the common good with all sincerity.

I entrust all our hopes and anxieties in this new moment to the tender heart of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the mother of Christ and the patroness of this exceptional nation. May she guide us in the ways of peace and obtain for us wisdom and the grace of a true patriotism and love of country.

FULL TEXT Source: https://www.usccb.org/news/2021/usccb-presidents-statement-inauguration-joseph-r-biden-jr-46th-president-united-states

Pope Francis sends Message to President Joe Biden "..I pray that your decisions will be guided by..." Official FULL TEXT



MESSAGE OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS TO THE 46th PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA JOSEPH R. BIDEN
 The Honorable Joseph R. Biden President of the United States of America The White House Washington, DC On the occasion of your inauguration as the forty-sixth President of the United States of America, I extend cordial good wishes and the assurance of my prayers that Almighty God will grant you wisdom and strength in the exercise of your high office. Under your leadership, may the American people continue to draw strength from the lofty political, ethical and religious values that have inspired the nation since its founding. At a time when the grave crises facing our human family call for farsighted and united responses, I pray that your decisions will be guided by a concern for building a society marked by authentic justice and freedom, together with unfailing respect for the rights and dignity of every person, especially the poor, the vulnerable and those who have no voice. I likewise ask God, the source of all wisdom and truth, to guide your efforts to foster understanding, reconciliation and peace within the United States and among the nations of the world in order to advance the universal common good. With these sentiments, I willingly invoke upon you and your family and the beloved American people an abundance of blessings. FRANCISCUS PP

Pope Francis says "During this time of serious hardship, this prayer is even more necessary so that unity..." FULL TEXT + Video


POPE FRANCIS at GENERAL AUDIENCE

Library of the Apostolic Palace
Wednesday, 20 January 2021
 

Catechesis - Prayer for Christian Unity

Dear brothers and sisters, good morning!

In this catechesis, we will reflect on the prayer for Christian unity. In fact, the week of the 18th to the 25th of January is dedicated specifically to this – to ask God for the gift of unity to overcome the scandal of division between believers in Jesus. After the Last Supper, He prayed for His own, “that they may all be one” (Jn 17:21). This was His prayer before the Passion, we could call it His spiritual testament. Let us note, however, that the Lord did not command that His disciples be united. No, He prayed. He prayed to the Father for us, so that we might be one.

 

 This means that we are not able to achieve unity with our own strength. Above all, unity is a gift, it is a grace to be requested through prayer.

Each one of us needs it. In fact, we know that we are not capable of preserving unity even within ourselves. Even the apostle Paul felt a painful conflict within himself: wanting the good but inclined toward evil (see Rm 7:19). He had thus grasped the root of so many divisions that surround us – between people, in families, in society, between nations and even between believers – and inside us. The Second Vatican Council stated, “the imbalances under which the world labors are linked with that more basic imbalance which is rooted in the heart of man. For in man himself many elements wrestle with one another. […] Hence he suffers from internal divisions, and from these flow so many and such great discords in society” (Gaudium et spes, 10). Therefore, the solution to these divisions is not to oppose someone, because discord generates more discord. The true remedy begins by asking God for peace, reconciliation, unity.

And this is valid, first of all, for Christians. Unity can be achieved only as a fruit of prayer. Diplomatic efforts and academic dialogue are not enough. These things are done, but they are not enough. Jesus knew this and opened the way for us by praying. Our prayer for unity is thus a humble but trusting participation in the Lord’s prayer, who promised that any prayer said in His name would be heard by the Father (see Jn 15:7). At this point, we can ask ourselves: “Do I pray for unity?” It is Jesus’s will but, if we inspect the intentions for which we pray, we would probably realize that we have prayed little, perhaps never, for Christian unity. And yet, the world’s faith depends on it; in fact, the Lord asked that we be one “so that the world might believe” (Jn 17:21). The world will not believe because we will have convinced it with good arguments, but if we will have borne witness to that love that unites us and draws us near, yes: it will believe.

During this time of serious hardship, this prayer is even more necessary so that unity might prevail over conflicts. It is urgent that we set aside preferences to promote the common good, and so our good example is fundamental: it is essential that Christians pursue the path toward full visible unity. In the last decades, thanks be to God, there have been many steps forward, but we still need to persevere in love and in prayer, without lacking trust or tiring. It is the path that the Holy Spirit gave rise to in the Church, in Christians and in us, from which there is no turning back. Ever onward.

To pray means to fight for unity. Yes, fight, because our enemy, the devil, is the one who divides, as the word itself says. Jesus asks the Holy Spirit for unity, to create unity. The devil always divides. He always divides because it is convenient for him to divide. He fosters division everywhere and in any way, while the Holy Spirit always joins in unity. In general, the devil does not tempt us with high theology, but with the weaknesses of our brothers and sisters. He is astute: he magnifies others’ mistakes and defects, sows discord, provokes criticism and creates factions. God has another way: He takes us as we are, He loves us so much, but He loves us as we are and takes us as we are; He takes those of us who are different, He takes sinners, and He always nudges us towards unity. We can evaluate ourselves and ask ourselves if, in the places in which we live, we nurture conflict or fight for an increase of unity with the tools that God has given us: prayer and love. What fuels conflict, instead, is gossip, always talking behind peoples’ backs. Gossip is the most handy weapon the devil has to divide the Christian community, to divide families, to divide friends, to always divide. The Holy Spirit always inspires unity.

The theme of this Week of Prayer specifically regards love: “Abide in my love and you shall bear much fruit” (see Jn 15:5-9). The root of communion and love is Christ who makes us overcome our prejudices to see in others a brother or sister to be loved always. Then we will discover that the Christians of other confessions – with their traditions, with their history – are gifts from God, they are gifts present within the territories of our diocesan and parish communities. Let us begin to pray for them and, when possible, with them. We will thus learn to love and appreciate them. Prayer, the Council reminds us, is the soul of every ecumenical movement (see Unitatis redintegratio, 8). Therefore, may prayer be the starting point to help Jesus make His dream come true: that they all may be one. Thank you.


Special Greetings

I cordially greet the English-speaking faithful. In this Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, let us ask the Father for the gift of full unity between all Christ’s disciples, for the spread of the Gospel and the salvation of the world. Upon you and your families I invoke the joy and peace of our Lord Jesus Christ. God bless you!


APPEAL

 

The day after tomorrow, Friday, 22 January, the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons enters into force. This is the first legally binding international instrument explicitly prohibiting these weapons, whose indiscriminate use would impact a huge number of people in a short time and would cause long-lasting damage to the environment.

I strongly encourage all States and all people to work decisively toward promoting conditions necessary for a world without nuclear weapons, contributing to the advancement of peace and multilateral cooperation which humanity greatly needs today.

US President-Elect Joe Biden Joins Leaders at National Cathedral for Prayer Service ahead of Inauguration on January 20, 2021 - FULL TEXT Release

Presidential Inaugural Committee and Washington National Cathedral Announce Virtual Presidential Inaugural Prayer Service (VIDEO Below)

01/19/2021

Then-President Biden to Join Interfaith Leaders for 59th Inaugural National Prayer Service on Thursday

Bishop William J. Barber II to Deliver Homily, Josh Groban, Patti LaBelle, The Clark Sisters to Perform

WASHINGTON — Today, the Presidential Inaugural Committee (PIC) and Washington National Cathedral announced the Virtual Presidential Inaugural Prayer Service on Thursday, January 21, at 10:00 AM ET. Then-President Joe Biden will join the virtual event hosted by the Washington National Cathedral, and the service will be livestreamed at https://bideninaugural.org/watch and https://cathedral.org with closed captioning and ASL provided. 

The diverse program will include prayers, readings, blessings, and hymns from interfaith leaders, celebrated artists, and other inspiring voices who will come together to mark the beginning of a new national journey that restores the soul of America, brings the country together, and creates a path to a brighter future.  

“The National Prayer Service is an important tradition for our nation and for President Biden, who has always been a man guided deeply by his faith. The program announced today will honor the role of faith in our country, and provide a moment to reflect on the unprecedented challenges we face, as we enter this new American chapter of healing to beat the pandemic, build back our economy better, and unify our country,” said PIC CEO and Delaware State University President Dr. Tony Allen.

The customary interfaith service, which dates back to the first inauguration of President George Washington, will be entirely virtual this year to engage Americans safely. Bishop William J. Barber II will deliver the homily, and the program will feature remarks from leading religious voices representing all walks of life and musical performances from Josh Groban, Patti LaBelle and The Clark Sisters. 

“This Cathedral is a House of Prayer for All People and a sacred space where America gathers in moments of deep significance, and we are honored to welcome the nation to pause, give thanks and seek God’s help in the hard work ahead. We thank President Biden, Vice President Harris and all our leaders for beginning this work in prayer as we strive to become the people God calls us to be,” said the Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith, dean of Washington National Cathedral. 

Additional participants in the service include: 

  • The Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry, Presiding Bishop and Primate, The Episcopal Church
  • The Right Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, Diocesan Bishop, Episcopal Diocese of Washington
  • The Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith, Dean, Washington National Cathedral
  • His Eminence Archbishop Elpidophoros, Primate of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America
  • Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum, Senior Rabbi, Congregation Beit Simchat Torah
  • Rabbi Sharon Brous, Senior Rabbi, IKAR
  • Jonathan Nez, President, Navajo Nation
  • Phefelia Nez, First Lady, Navajo Nation
  • The Rev. Jim Wallis, Founder and Ambassador of Sojourners
  • Sr. Carol Keehan, Former President and CEO, Catholic Health Association 
  • The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III, Senior Pastor, Trinity United Church of Christ
  • Dr. Debbie Almontaser, Senior Advisor, Emgage NY and President, Muslim Community Network
  • Imam Azhar Subedar, Imam, IACC
  • The Rev. Dr. Alexia Salvatierra, Assistant Professor of Mission and Global Transformation, Fuller Theological Seminary
  • Barbara Satin, Faith Work Director, The National LGBTQ Task Force
  • Anuttama Dasa, Global Minister of Communications, International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON)
  • Valarie Kaur, Sikh American Activist, Author of “See No Stranger”   
  • The Rev. Dr. Gregory Knox Jones, Senior Pastor, Westminster Presbyterian Church
  • Bishop Vashti McKenzie, African Methodist Episcopal Church
  • The Rev. Dr. Paula Stone Williams, Author and Pastor, Left Hand Church
  • The Rev. Fred Davie, Executive Vice President, Union Theological Seminary
  • The Rev. Robert W. Fisher, Rector, St. John’s, Lafayette Square
  • The Rev. Dr. Yvette Flunder, Presiding Bishop, The Fellowship of Affirming Ministries 
  • Emma Petty Addams, Executive Director, Mormon Women for Ethical Government 
  • The Rev. Dr. Cynthia L. Hale, Senior Pastor, Ray of Hope Christian Church
  • The Rev. Dr. Jeffrey Kuan, President, Claremont School of Theology
  • First Lady Robin Jackson, Brookland Baptist Church
  • The Rev. Dr. Jacqui Lewis, Senior Minister, Middle Collegiate Church 
  • The Revd. Canon Rosemarie Logan Duncan, Canon for Worship, Washington National Cathedral
  • The Rev. Robert W. Lee, Pastor, Unifour Church
  • Sr. Norma Pimentel, Executive Director, Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley
  • Jen Hatmaker, NYT Bestselling Author, Podcast Host, and Speaker

Over the course of five days of programming, “America United” inaugural activities will honor our traditions while safely allowing more Americans than ever before to participate from their own homes. These activities include, “United We Serve,” a National Day of Service on January 18, Martin Luther King Jr. Day; a nationwide COVID-19 Memorial to Lives Lost on January 19; and the official Inaugural Ceremonies, a wreath laying on Arlington National Cemetery, and a “Parade Across America” on January 20. The events will culminate with the “Celebrating America” program. The PIC will also install an extensive public art display — a “Field of Flags,” which will cover the National Mall up to 13th Street — to represent the American people who are unable to travel to Washington, DC. 

Source: https://bideninaugural.org/news/

Pope Francis Congratulates Sports Team on Big Win - the Spezia Football Team Meets with the Pope at the Vatican


Spezia Calcio is a professional football club based in La Spezia, Liguria in Italy.
The club is playing in the Serie A for the first time in its history, after being promoted to the top tier for the first time after play-offs in the 2019-20 season.

GREETING FROM THE HOLY FATHER FRANCIS

TO THE FOOTBALL TEAM OF THE CITY OF LA SPEZIA

Sala Clementina
Wednesday, January 20, 2021

 Good morning! Good morning to all of you.

First of all, congratulations, because you were good yesterday. Compliments! In Argentina, tango is danced, and tango is two by four music [based on the tempo of the two quarters]. You are 4 to 2 today [refers to the previous night's victory], okay. Congratulations and courage!

And thank you for this visit, because I like to see the effort of young people and young women in sport, because sport is a marvel, sport “brings up” all the best we have inside. Keep up with this, because it brings you to a great nobility. Thanks for the testimony.

Source: Vatican.va and VaticanNews - Image Screen Shot 


RIP Mother Giovanna - Beloved Catholic Nun and Missionary Doctor Dies in India at Age 93 of the Ursulines - a Pioneer of Healthcare for Humanity



Doctor (Sister) Maria ALBERONI (Mother GIOVANNA) (1928 – 2021) 
 The Archdiocese of Bombay offers its condolences to the Congregation of Ursulines of Mary Immaculate (UMI) on the sad demise of Mother Giovanna Alberoni, on January 18, 2021. Mother Giovanna, former Superior General of the Ursulines of Mary Immaculate, was the first Ursuline nun to pursue medical studies in India. A true missionary, she left her native Italy and placed herself, selflessly, at the service of humanity. Her vision and passion resulted in what is the Holy Family Hospital, Bandra, today. What started as a 10-bed nursing home, in the 40’s, is now a multi-speciality hospital with 268 beds, which also boasts a medical research centre. Having served the Lord faithfully, Mother Giovanna Alberoni passed away peacefully, due to old age complications, at the age of 93. The Archdiocese of Bombay is grateful to this pioneer of healthcare for her overwhelming service to humanity and dedication to duty. Our prayers are with her Congregation, friends and relatives. May her soul rest in peace. Press Office Archdiocese of Bombay India  19th January 2021 

Saint January 20 : Bl. Cyprian Michael Iwene Tansi a Nigerian Priest who Ministered to the Poor, the Lonely, and the Sick


This Saint was Born on September, 1903, in Aguleri, Anambra, Nigeria
Died:
January 20, 1964, Leicester, England
Beatified:
March 22, 1998 by Pope John Paul II
Bl. Cyprian Iwene Tansi was born in Nigeria, Africa, in 1903. His parents were not Christians, but they sent Iwene to a school run by Catholic missionaries. There he learned about Jesus and made the decision to become a follower of Christ. He received the name Michael when he was baptized.

Teachers were needed for the Catholic schools founded by the missionaries, so Michael decided to become a teacher. He earned his teaching certificate when he was only 16. He taught for several years and even became a headmaster, or principal. Michael’s work was satisfying, but he wanted to do more to help others to find Christ.

Michael entered St. Paul’s Seminary at Igbarium in 1925. After ordination in 1937, he served as a parish priest in several villages. It was important for him to know all his parishioners, so he traveled on foot or on his bicycle to minister to the poor, the lonely, and the sick. He had a special interest in preparing young women for marriage. With the help of local nuns, the women were taught about Christian marriage and how to care for the children they would have.

Michael longed for the chance to spend more time in quiet prayer. He bishop gave him permission to join an order of Trappist monks in England. In the monastery, Michael took the name “Father Cyprian.” He hoped that one day he would be able to open a Trappist monastery in Nigeria.

After many prayerful years in the monastery, Father Cyprian died in 1964. His body was returned to his homeland for burial in 1986.

Father Cyprian was declared “Blessed” by Pope John Paul II in 1998 in ceremonies in Nigeria.

Source: SaintsResource.com