Saturday, February 13, 2021

Sunday Holy Mass Online : Sun. February 14, 2021 - #Eucharist on 6th of Ordinary Time in Your Virtual Church - B


Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 77
Reading I
Lv 13:1-2, 44-46
The LORD said to Moses and Aaron,
“If someone has on his skin a scab or pustule or blotch
which appears to be the sore of leprosy,
he shall be brought to Aaron, the priest,
or to one of the priests among his descendants.
If the man is leprous and unclean,
the priest shall declare him unclean
by reason of the sore on his head.
“The one who bears the sore of leprosy
shall keep his garments rent and his head bare,
and shall muffle his beard;
he shall cry out, ‘Unclean, unclean!’
As long as the sore is on him he shall declare himself unclean,
since he is in fact unclean.
 
 He shall dwell apart, making his abode outside the camp.”
Responsorial Psalm
Ps 32:1-2, 5, 11
R. (7) I turn to you, Lord, in time of trouble, and you fill me with the joy of salvation.
Blessed is he whose fault is taken away,
    whose sin is covered.
Blessed the man to whom the LORD imputes not guilt,
    in whose spirit there is no guile.
R. I turn to you, Lord, in time of trouble, and you fill me with the joy of salvation.
Then I acknowledged my sin to you,
    my guilt I covered not.
I said, “I confess my faults to the LORD,”
    and you took away the guilt of my sin.
R. I turn to you, Lord, in time of trouble, and you fill me with the joy of salvation.
Be glad in the LORD and rejoice, you just;
    exult, all you upright of heart.
R. I turn to you, Lord, in time of trouble, and you fill me with the joy of salvation.
Reading II
1 Cor 10:31—11:1
Brothers and sisters,
Whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do,
do everything for the glory of God.
Avoid giving offense, whether to the Jews or Greeks or 
the church of God,
just as I try to please everyone in every way,
not seeking my own benefit but that of the many,
that they may be saved.
Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ.
Alleluia
Lk 7:16
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
A great prophet has arisen in our midst,
God has visited his people.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Gospel
Mk 1:40-45
A leper came to Jesus and kneeling down begged him and said,
“If you wish, you can make me clean.”
Moved with pity, he stretched out his hand, 
touched him, and said to him, 
“I do will it. Be made clean.”
The leprosy left him immediately, and he was made clean.
Then, warning him sternly, he dismissed him at once. 
He said to him, “See that you tell no one anything,
but go, show yourself to the priest 
and offer for your cleansing what Moses prescribed;
that will be proof for them.”
The man went away and began to publicize the whole matter.
He spread the report abroad
so that it was impossible for Jesus to enter a town openly.
He remained outside in deserted places,
and people kept coming to him from everywhere.
Prayer to Make a Spiritual Communion-
People who cannot communicate now make spiritual communion

At your feet, O my Jesus I bow down and offer you the repentance of my contrite heart, which abysses itself into its nothingness and Your holy presence. I adore you in the Sacrament of Your love, the ineffable Eucharist. I wish to receive you in the poor home that my heart offers you. In anticipation of the happiness of sacramental communion, I want to possess you in spirit. Come to me, oh my Jesus, that I may come to you. May Your love inflame my whole being, for life and death. I believe in you, I hope in you, I love you. So be it. Amen

Saint February 14 : St. Valentine, a Martyr and the Patron of Love and Marriage


In the early martyrologies, three different St. Valentines are mentioned, all sharing Feb. 14 for a feast day. 
The 1st -
A Roman Priest during the reign  of Emperor Claudias II who persecuted the church at that particular time," an edict prohibited the marriage of young people. This was based on the hypothesis that unmarried soldiers fought better than married soldiers because married soldiers might be afraid of what might happen to them or their wives or families if they died." Valentine was caught, imprisoned and tortured for performing marriage ceremonies against command of Emperor Claudius II.  "One of the men who was to judge him in line with the Roman law at the time was a man called Asterius, whose daughter, Julia, was blind.  Valentine gave Julia lessons because she needed someone to read material for her to learn it. Valentine then became friends with Julia through his work with her when she came to visit him in jail.
Emperor Claudius came to like Valentine, too, so he offered to pardon Valentine and set him free if Valentine would renounce his Christian faith and agree to worship the Roman gods. Not only did Valentine refuse to leave his faith, he also encouraged Emperor Claudius to place his trust in Christ. Valentine’s faithful choices cost him his life. Emperor Claudius was so enraged at Valentine’s response that he sentenced Valentine to die. Valentine prayed with and healedJulia,and Asterius himself became Christian as a result.

Valentine used his time in jail to continue to reach out to people with the love that he said Jesus Christ gave him for others.
Before he was killed, Valentine wrote a last note to encourage Julia to stay close to Jesus and to thank her for being his friend. He signed the note: “From your Valentine.” That note inspired people to begin writing their own loving messages to people on Valentine’s Feast Day.

SEE ALSO:
Easy Novena to St. Valentine - Patron of Love, Marriage and Fiancees - Prayers to SHARE https://www.catholicnewsworld.com/2018/02/easy-novena-to-st-valentine-patron-of.html
In the year 269 AD, Valentine was sentenced to a three part execution of a beating, stoning, and finally decapitation all because of his stand for Christian marriage. The story goes that the last words he wrote were in a note to Asterius' daughter. He inspired today's romantic missives by signing it, "from your Valentine." Eventually, St. Valentine was also arrested, condemned to death for his faith, beaten with clubs, and finally beheaded on Feb. 14, AD 270. He was buried on the Flaminian Way. Later, Pope Julius I (333-356) built a basilica at the site which preserved St. Valentine's tomb. Archeological digs in the 1500s and 1800s have found evidence of the tomb of St. Valentine. However, in the thirteenth century, his relics were transferred to the Church of Saint Praxedes near the Basilica of St. Mary Major, where they remain today. Also, a small church was built near the Flaminian Gate of Rome which is now known as the Porta del Popolo but was called in the 12th century "the Gate of St. Valentine," as noted by the early British historian William Somerset (also known as William of Malmesbury, d. 1143), who ranks after St. Bede in authority.

The second St. Valentine was the Bishop of Interamna (now Terni, located about 60 miles from Rome). Under the orders of Prefect Placidus, he too was arrested, scourged, and decapitated, again suffering persecution during the time of Emperor Claudius II.
The third St. Valentine suffered martyrdom in Africa with several companions. However, nothing further is known about this saint. In all, these men, each named St. Valentine, showed heroic love for the Lord and His Church.
The popular customs of showing love and affection on St. Valentine's Day is almost a coincidence with the feast day of the saint: During the Medieval Age, a common belief in England and France was that birds began to pair on Feb.14, "half-way through the second month of the year." Chaucer wrote in his "Parliament of Foules" (in Old English): "For this was on Seynt Valentyne's day, When every foul cometh ther to choose his mate." For this reason, the day was dedicated to "lovers" and prompted the sending of letters, gifts, or other signs of affection.
Another literary example of St. Valentine's Day remembrances is found in Dame Elizabeth Brews "Paston Letters" (1477), where she writes to the suitor, John Paston, of her daughter, Margery: "And, cousin mine, upon Monday is St. Valentine's day and every bird chooseth himself a mate, and if it like you to come on Thursday night, and make provision that you may abide till then, I trust to God that ye shall speak to my husband and I shall pray that we may bring the matter to a conclusion." In turn, Margery wrote to John: "Unto my right well beloved Valentine John Paston, Squyer, be this bill delivered. Right reverend and worshipful and my right well beloved Valentine, I recommend me unto you, full heartily desiring to hear of your welfare, which I beseech Almighty God long for to preserve until His pleasure and your heart's desire." While speaking of the amorous flavour of Valentine's Day, no mention is made of the saint. The love of our Lord, depicted beautifully in the image of His most Sacred Heart, is a sacrificial, self-less, and unconditional love. Such is the love that each Christian is called to express in his own life, for God and neighbour. Clearly, St. Valentine-no matter which one-showed such a love, bearing witness to the faith in his dedication as a priest and in the offering of his own life in martyrdom. On this Valentine's day, looking to the example of this great saint, each person should offer again his love to the Lord, for only by doing so can he properly love those who are entrusted to his care and any other neighbour. Each person should again pledge his love to those loved ones, praying for their intentions, promising fidelity to them, and thanking them for their love in return. Never forget Jesus said, "This is my commandment: love one another as I have loved you. There is no greater love than this: to lay down one's life for one's friends" (Jn 15:12-13). St. Valentine fulfilled this command, and may we do the same. 

Top 30 Catholic Love Quotes to SHARE - Amazing #Quotes from Saints on #Love and Life


1. "Spread love everywhere you go: first of all in your own house. Give love to your children, to your wife or husband, to a next door neighbor... Let no one ever come to you without leaving better and happier. Be the living expression of God's kindness; kindness in your face, kindness in your eyes, kindness in your smile, kindness in your warm greeting."
--Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta

2. Pure love ... knows that only one thing is needed to please God: to do even the smallest things out of great love - love, and always love. (140)
--Divine Mercy in My Soul, St. Faustina
 
 3. "The proof of love is in the works. Where love exists, it works great things. But when it ceases to act, it ceases to exist."
--Pope St. Gregory the Great

4. "What does love look like? It has the hands to help others. It has the feet to hasten to the poor and needy. It has eyes to see misery and want. It has the ears to hear the sighs and sorrows of men. That is what love looks like."
--St. Augustine of Hippo

5. "You know well enough that Our Lord does not look so much at the greatness of our actions, nor even at their difficulty, but at the love with which we do them."
--St. Therese of Lisieux 

6. "Lord, grant that I might not so much seek to be loved as to love."
--Saint Francis of Assisi

7. "What a weakness it is to love Jesus Christ only when He caresses us, and to be cold immediately once He afflicts us. This is not true love. Those who love thus, love themselves too much to love God with all their heart."
--St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

8. "Our Lord loves you and loves you tenderly; and if He does not let you feel the sweetness of His love, it is to make you more humble and abject in your own eyes."
--St. Pio of Pietrelcino

9."We must love our neighbor as being made in the image of God and as an object of His love."
--Saint Vincent de Paul

10.
"The Eucharist is the Sacrament of Love; It signifies Love, It produces love. The Eucharist is the consummation of the whole spiritual life."
--Saint Thomas Aquinas


11."As for what concerns our relations with our fellow men, the anguish in our neighbor's soul must break all precept. All that we do is a means to an end, but love is an end in itself, because God is love."
--St. Edith Stein

12. Charity is the sweet and holy bond which links the soul with its Creator: it binds God with man and man with God.
--Saint Catherine of Siena

13. 'The person who loves God cannot help loving every man as himself, even though he is grieved by the passions of those who are not yet purified. But when they amend their lives, his delight is indescribable and knows no bounds. A soul filled with thoughts of sensual desire and hatred is unpurified. If we detect any trace of hatred in our hearts against any man whatsoever for committing any fault, we are utterly estranged from love for God, since love for God absolutely precludes us from hating any man.'
--St. Maximos the Confessor

14. What is the mark of love for your neighbor? Not to seek what is for your own benefit, but what is for the benefit of the one loved, both in body and in soul.
--St. Basil the Great

15. "You learn to speak by speaking, to study by studying, to run by running, to work by working, and just so, you learn to love by loving. All those who think to learn in any other way deceive themselves."
--St. Francis de Sales

16. "Everything comes from love,
all is ordained for the salvation of man,
God does nothing without this goal in mind."
--St. Catherine of Siena


17. "We cannot all do great things, but we can do small things with great love"
--Blessed Mother Teresa


18. "There is no place for selfishness—and no place for fear! Do not be afraid, then, when love makes demands. Do not be afraid when love requires sacrifice"
--Pope John Paul II

19. "We become what we love and who we love shapes what we become. If we love things, we become a thing. If we love nothing, we become nothing. Imitation is not a literal mimicking of Christ, rather it means becoming the image of the beloved, an image disclosed through transformation. This means we are to become vessels of God´s compassionate love for others. "
--St. Clare of Assisi

20. "Nothing is sweeter than love, nothing stronger or higher or wider; nothing is more pleasant, nothing fuller, and nothing better in heaven or on earth, for love is born of God and cannot rest except in God, Who is above all created things."
--St. Thomas a Kempis, Imitation of Christ

21. "Love is the most necessary of all virtues. Love in the person who preaches the word of God is like fire in a musket. If a person were to throw a bullet with his hands, he would hardly make a dent in anything; but if the person takes the same bullet and ignites some gunpowder behind it, it can kill. It is much the same with the word of God. If it is spoken by someone who is filled with the fire of charity- the fire of love of God and neighbor- it will work wonders."
--St. Anthony Mary Claret (from his autobiography).

22. "Real love is demanding. I would fail in my mission if I did not tell you so. Love demands a personal commitment to the will of God."
--Pope John Paul II


23. “God loves each of us as if there were only one of us.”
--St Augustine


24. Always remember to love your neighbor; always prefer the one who tries your patience, who test your virtue, because with her you can always merit: suffering is Love; the Law is Love. 
--Bl Mary of Jesus Crucified "The Little Arab"


25. A soul enkindled with love is a gentle, meek, humble, and patient soul. 
--St John of the Cross, OCD

26. You know that our Lord does not look at the greatness or difficulty of our action, but at the love with which you do it. What, then, have you to fear? 
--St Therese of the Child Jesus and the Holy Face, OCD


27. What we need most in order to make progress is to be silent before this great God with our appetite and with our tongue, for the language he best hears is silent love.   
--St John of the Cross, OCD


28. Love takes up where knowledge leaves off.
--Saint Thomas Aquinas

29. 'My Jesus, fill my heart with so much love that one day it will break just to be with you. My Jesus, you know I have placed you as a seal on my heart. Remain there always.'
--St. Bernadette Soubirous

30."He alone loves the Creator perfectly
who manifests a pure love for his neighbor." 
--St. Bede the Venerable

Creative New Idea for Ash Wednesday Take Home Ashes - Interview with Bishop Thomas Dowd Explaining his Diocese's Initiative

_In this interview with Bishop Thomas Dowd, of the diocese of Sault Sainte Marie in Northern Ontario, Canada, he explains his new initiative for Ash Wednesday. Bishop Dowd was installed as bishop of Sault-Sainte Marie last Dec. 17, 2020. 
Ash Wednesday is an important day for Catholics as 
it's the start of Lent. In this video, Bishop Dowd explains the creative new initiative for Ash Wednesday in his diocese during the time of the pandemic.
 
Ash Wednesday begins the Lenten period
in the Church. It is a period of repentance and spiritual renewal.
While the churches are expected to be permitted to reopen next week across Northern Ontario, there still remains a capacity restriction as well
as parishioners who feel uncomfortable returning at this time; this is the case in many churches around the world.
Bishop Dowd is encouraging all Catholics to still celebrate Ash Wednesday – the beginning of Lent - in a special way. Parishioners who cannot attend Mass on Ash Wednesday are asked to go to their parishes
(between February 17 and February 28)
to pick up blessed ashes and a prayer service brochure, and pray at home with the members of their household.
The ashes are blessed by a priest at each Catholic parish on Ash Wednesday, and parishioners are encouraged to take home
a small container of the blessed ashes along with a short prayer service to pray together with their family or those in their household.
The short prayer service includes short readings from the Bible, and instructions on how to distribute the ashes. See below for full instructional links from diocese. 
***********************
Bishop Dowd gave a special blessings to all of viewers of Catholic News World during the interview. He said:
May God bless you and keep you;
May he make His face shine upon you,
And be gracious to you; May he share
with you His kindness, show you His peace.
And may Almighty God bless you. In the Name
of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen  
(Image Source: Facebook Page of Bishop Thomas Dowd)
VIEW the Diocese Announcement : https://dioceseofsaultstemarie.org/ash2021
Prayers, Readings and Instructions for distribution of ashes at home:
Beautiful Instructional Video by the Diocese:

Wow Our Lady's Chocolate! Ferrero founder's Success due to Our Lady of Lourdes - Kinder, Nutella and TicTacs included...

Michele Ferrero lived from 26 April 1925 to 14 February 2015. He was the Italian who owned the chocolate manufacturer Ferrero SpA. Ferrero's father started this company in 1946, from a small bakery and café of his father in Alba, Piedmont. Michele Ferrero's brands include Nutella, Mon Chéri, Kinder Chocolate, Ferrero Rocher, Tic Tacs and Kinder Eggs. He is said to have named Ferrero Rocher after a sacred grotto in Lourdes.  Ferrero and his wife Maria Franca Fissolo had two sons together, Giovanni Ferrero and Pietro Ferrero Jr.Michele was a fervent Catholic. Ferrero made a pilgrimage to the Lourdes shrine annually, and had a Madonna placed in every factory and office.
Watch this Short Video which tells Ferrero's story!
It is even rumoured that the company's Rocher pralines were inspired by the Rocher de Massabielle, the craggy rock formation in which Catholics believe the mother of Jesus made a miraculous appearance in the 19th century. It is the only Ferrero product that bears the family's name.
He also took employees on pilgrimage to the site.
Ferrero died on 14 February 2015, at his home in Monte Carlo, Monaco. He was 89. Michele Ferrero said at the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the company: “The success of Ferrero we owe to Our Lady of Lourdes, without her we can do little.” Michele Ferrero was the richest person in Italy, with a worth of $23.4 billion.  Ferrero operates in 53 countries with over 34,000 employees.
Source: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2011/oct/28/ferrero-unwrapped

Catholic Missionary Priest - Fr. Pedro Opeka has been Nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize by Prime Minister of Slovenia


The Lazarist missionary, Fr. Pedro Opeka has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for his work among the poor in Madagascar. The Argentinian-Slovenian missionary Father Pedro Opeka and his  association “Akamasoa” (“City of Friendship”) have been nominated for the Peace Nobel Prize by the Prime Minister of Slovenia, Janez Janša. The nomination was announced on January 31st on the official website of the Slovenian government. (Excerpt from VaticanNews)
 A life helping the poor people
Father Pedro Pablo Opeka was born in 1948 on June the 29th in Argentina, in San Martin, a suburb of Buenos Aires, from parents of Slovene origin. He started working as a bricklayer with his father, himself also a bricklayer.
At 15 years old, he decided to become a priest and enter the seminary of the Vincentians Fathers (Lazarists). At 20 years old, he went back to Lubiana in Slovenia, the land of his parents, to further his training. Two years later, he went to Madagascar where he worked as a bricklayer in the parishes of Lazarists fathers. It is there that he discovered his vocation as a missionary.
He finished his studies in the Catholic Institute of Paris. He met the Taizé Community and travelled all over Europe. On the 28th of September 1975, he was ordained priest in Buenos Aires and was nominated responsible of a rural parish in the South-East of Madagascar, Vangaindrano.

In 1989, his superiors nominated him director of a seminary in Antananarivo, the capital. This is when a new story started. Father Pedro could not remain indifferent to the misery of thousands of homeless people in the capital, who lived in utterly impoverished conditions, in the streets or in rubbish tips. Father Pedro became friend with these people and gained their confidence. This is how the Akamasoa association was born…
FATHER PEDRO WITH THE POPE BENEDETTO XVI

ROME – JANUARY 2007
International recognitions
Appointed as Officer of National Order of Merit, France (1998)
Awarded Missionary of the Jubilee Year by the Pope, Rome The Vatican (2000),
Award for humanitarian work, USA (2001)
Awarded the World Service Medal by the Kiwanis International (2005).
Appointed as Knight of Legion of Honor, France (2008),
St. Matthew Foundation Awards for outstanding service in solidarity and social justice by The president of the Pontifical Council
for Justice and Peace, Vatican (2008)
Awarded the Golden Order for Services, Slovenia (2009)
Commander of the National Order, Madagascar (2010)
Nominated “Among the Top Ten” people in the world, by the Vatican magazine (2010)
National Commander of the Order, Madagascar (2010)
Awarded the Highest distinction of the League of Universal Human Right in Paris (2012)
Awarded by the Pope Benoit the highest recognition of the Vatican, “International distinction of the Cardinal Nguyen Van Thuan
Father Pedro Opeka received on October 29th 2015 in New York the highest award conferred by St. John’s University entitled “Spirit of Service Award”
Father Pedro has been proposed as a candidate for the Nobel Peace Prize.
In addition, He is the author of numerous books written in French, German, Italian, Slovene and English
Biographical Source: https://www.madagascar-foundation.org/father-pedro/

Biography of Fr. Pedro:

Glorious "Hymn of the Cherubim" by Tchaikovsky - Hauntingly Beautiful will Touch you Soul!


~Listen to this Beautiful Cherubic Hymn which is the primary cherubikon (Gr: χερουβικόν), or song of the angels, sung during every Divine Liturgy of the year. The Cherubic Hymn was added to the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom near the end of the sixth century. 
SHARE this Beautiful Hymn to Touch a Soul!
Translation in English:
 "We, who mystically represent the Cherubim, And chant the thrice-holy hymn to the Life-giving Trinity, Let us set aside the cares of life That we may receive the King of all, Who comes invisibly escorted by the Divine Hosts." 
Lyrics in Greek:

Οἱ τὰ Χερουβεὶμ μυστικῶς εἰκονίζοντες,
καὶ τῇ ζωοποιῷ Τριάδι τὸν Τρισάγιον ὕμνον προσάδοντες,
πᾶσαν τὴν βιοτικὴν ἀποθώμεθα μέριμναν.
Ὡς τὸν Βασιλέα τῶν ὅλων ὑποδεξόμενοι,
ταῖς ἀγγελικαῖς ἀοράτως δορυφορούμενον τάξεσιν.

Ἀλληλούϊα, Ἀλληλούϊα, Ἀλληλούϊα.

Image Source : Google : 1854 Louis Janmot (French; 1814-92)