Thursday, April 1, 2021

Saint April 2 : St. Francis of Paola who had the Gift of Prophecy and Founder of the Order of Minims

 


Born:
1416 at Paola, Calabria, Italy
Died:
2 April 1507 at Plessis, France
Canonized:
1512 by Pope Julius II
Founder of the Order of Minims; b. in 1416, at Paula, in Calabria, Italy; d. 2 April, 1507, at Plessis, France. His parents were remarkable for the holiness of their lives. Remaining childless for some years after their marriage they had recourse to prayer, especially commending themselves to the intercession of St. Francis of Assisi. Three children were eventually born to them, eldest of whom was Francis. When still in the cradle he suffered from a swelling which endangered the sight of one of his eyes. His parents again had recourse to Francis of Assisi, and made a vow that their son should pass an entire year in the "little habit" of St Francis in one of the convents of his order, a not uncommon practice in the Middle Ages. The child was immediately cured. From his early years Francis showed signs of extraordinary sanctity, and at the age of thirteen, being admonished by a vision of a Franciscan friar, he entered a convent of the Franciscan Order in order to fulfil the vow made by his parents. Here he gave great edification by his love of prayer and mortification, his profound humility, and his prompt obedience. At the completion of the year he went with his parents on a pilgrimage to Assisi, Rome, and other places of devotion. Returning to Paula he selected a retired spot on his father's estate, and there lived in solitude; but later on he found a more retired dwelling in a cave on the sea coast. Here he remained alone for about six years giving himself to prayer and mortification. In 1435 two companions joined him in his retreat, and to accommodate them Francis caused three cells and a chapel to be built: in this way the new order was begun. The number of his disciples gradually increased, and about 1454, with the permission of Pyrrhus, Archbishop of Cosenza, Francis built a large monastery and church. The building of this monastery was the occasion of a great outburst of enthusiasm and devotion on the part of the people towards Francis: even the nobles carried stones and joined in the work. Their devotion was increased by the many miracles which the saint wrought in answer to their prayers. The rule of life adopted by Francis and his religious was one of extraordinary severity. They observed perpetual abstinence and lived in great poverty, but the distinguishing mark of the order was humility. They were to seek to live unknown and hidden from the world. To express this character which he would have his disciples cultivate, Francis eventually obtained from the Holy See that they should be styled Minims, the least of all religious. In 1474 Sixtus IV gave him permission to write a rule for his community, and to assume the title of Hermits of St. Francis: this rule was formally approved by Alexander VI, who, however, changed their title into that of Minims. After the approbation of the order, Francis founded several new monasteries in Calabria and Sicily. He also established convents of nuns, and a third order for people living in the world, after the example of St. Francis of Assisi. He had an extraordinary gift of prophecy: thus he foretold the capture of Otranto by the Turks in 1480, and its subsequent recovery by the King of Naples. Also he was gifted with discernment of consciences. He was no respecter of persons of whatever rank or position. He rebuked the King of Naples for his ill-doing and in consequence suffered much persecution. When Louis XI was in his last illness he sent an embassy to Calabria to beg the saint to visit him. Francis refused to come nor could he be prevailed upon until the pope ordered him to go. He then went to the king at Plessis-les-Tours and was with him at his death. Charles VIII, Louis's successor, much admired the saint and during his reign kept him near the court and frequently consulted him. This king built a monastery for Minims at Plessis and another at Rome on the Pincian Hill. The regard in which Charles VIII held the saint was shared by Louis XII, who succeeded to the throne in 1498. Francis was now anxious to return to Italy, but the king would not permit him, not wishing to lose his counsels and direction. The last three months of his life he spent in entire solitude, preparing for death. On Maundy Thursday he gathered his community around him and exhorted them especially to have mutual charity amongst themselves and to maintain the rigour of their life and in particular perpetual abstinence. The next day, Good Friday, he again called them together and gave them his last instructions and appointed a vicar-general. He then received the last sacraments and asked to have the Passion according to St. John read out to him, and whilst this was being read, his soul passed away. Leo X canonized him in 1519. In 1562 the Huguenots broke open his tomb and found his body incorrupt. They dragged it forth and burnt it, but some of the bones were preserved by the Catholics and enshrined in various churches of his order. The Order of Minims does not seem at any time to have been very extensive, but they had houses in many countries. The definitive rule was approved in 1506 by Julius II, who also approved a rule for the nuns of the order. The feast of St. Francis of Paula is kept by the universal Church on 2 April, the day on which he died. The Catholic Encyclopedia 

Saints of April - List of Saint Feast Days for the Month of April - Inspiring Stories to Share!


Here is a List of Saint Stories for the month of April; Click each title to learn more about these inspiring holy heroes!
Saint April 1 : St. Hugh of Grenoble a Carthusian known for Preaching and his Generosity to the Poor

Saint April 2 : St. Francis of Paola who had the Gift of Prophecy and Founder of the Order of Minims

Saint April 2 : St. Mary of Egypt a Former Prostitute who Repented and lived as a Hermitess in the Desert

Saint April 3 : St. Richard : Bishop and Confessor : Patron of Coachmen

Saint April 3 : St. Luigi Scrosoppi the Patron Saint of Football and Founder of the Congregation of Providence

Saint April 4 : St. Isidore of Seville a Bishop of Spain and Patron of the Internet with Prayer

Saint April 5 : St. Vincent Ferrer a Dominican who was known for Prophecy and Patron of Builders, construction workers, Plumbers

Saint April 6 : St. William of Eskilsoe a French Abbot and Confessor who died in 1203

Saint April 7 : St. John Baptist de la Salle the Patron of Teachers, Educators, School principals with Prayer

Saint April 8 : St. Julia Billiart the Patron of Poverty, Sick people and Foundress of the Sisters of Notre Dame

Saint April 9 : St. Mary Cleophas : Mother of St. James the Less Apostle

Saint April 10 : St. Fulbert Bishop of Chartres who Rebuilt the Cathedral when it Burned Down and was Devoted to Mary

Saint April 10 : Magdalena of Canossa (1774-1835) - Foundress of the Canossian Family who Helped the Poor

Saint April 11 : St. Stanislaus : Patron of Poland, Soldiers in battle : Bishop and Martyr

Saint April 11 : St. Gemma Galgani - Patron of Students, Pharmacists, Tuberculosis patients, love and hope

Saint April 12 : Saint Julius I : Pope who convened the synod at Rome 

Saint April 12 : St. Zeno : Patron of Fishermen and Newborn Babies

Saint April 13 : Pope St. Martin I : Martyr - Died 655

Saint April 13 : Blessed Margaret of Castello - Abandoned by her Parents due to her Disabilities - Patron of the Ugly with Novena Prayer

Saint April 14 : St. Lydwine of Schiedam - Patron of Ice Skaters and Chronically Ill

Saint April 15 : St. Hunna of Strasbourg who would Wash the clothing of the Poor and the Patron of Laundry and Maids

Saint April 16 : St. Benedict Joseph Labre who was a Beggar and the Patron of Mental illness, Bachelors and Homeless

Saint April 16 : St. Bernadette Soubirous the Visionary of Lourdes and Patron of Sick and Poor - whose Body is Incorrupt

Saint April 17 : St. Stephen Harding : Abbot of Citeaux and a Confessor

Saint April 17 : St. Kateri Tekakwitha the “Lily of the Mohawks” and Patron of Ecology and Natives and Mohawks (in Canada)

Saint April 18 : St. Apollonius the Apologist a Martyr of Rome

Saint April 19 : St. Leo IX : Pope who established Peace and Died 1054

Saint April 20 : St. Agnes of Montepulciano a Dominican Nun and Foundress who became a Prioress at Age 15

Saint April 21 : St. Anselm a Doctor of the Church and Archbishop of Canterbury who Argued for the Existence of God

Saint April 22 : St. Opportuna a Virgin and Abbess whose brother was a Saintly Bishop

Saint April 23 : St. Adalbert of Prague an Archbishop and Patron of Poland and Bohemia

Saint April 23 : St. George a Martyr and Patron of Soldiers, Skin Diseases, Shepherds, and Equestrians

Saint April 24 : St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen who spent Hours in Prayer before the Eucharist and Patron of Travelers

Saint April 25 : St. Mark Evangelist who is Represented by a Lion and the Patron of Lawyers and Prisoners

Feast April 26 : Our Lady of Good Counsel with short History and Novena Prayer to Share!

Saint April 26 : St. Marcellinus Pope and Martyr

Saint April 27 : St. Zita : Patron of Servants, Homemakers , Rape victims, Waitresses

Saint April 28 St. Louis de Montfort - Established True Devotion to Mary

Saint April 28 St. Gianna Beretta Molla - Patron of Unborn Babies , Mothers , and Physicians

Saint April 29 : St. Catherine of Siena - Doctor of the Church - Patron of Television, Nurses and Europe

Saint April 30 : St. Pius V a Dominican Pope and Reformer who helped the Poor and Died 1572

Saint April 30 : St. Marie de l'Incarnation and Founder of the Ursulines in Canada

Holy Mass of the Lord's Supper on Holy Thursday from the Vatican “Christ loved us and wanted to be near every one of us forever, even to the end of the world.” FULL VIDEO




Cardinal Giovanni Battista Re presided over the Mass of the Lord’s Supper on Holy Thursday in the evening at St. Peter’s Basilica. The liturgy, is known as In Coena Domini or Mass "of the Lord's Supper." It commemorates the institution of the Holy Eucharist by Jesus. Cardinal Re gave the homily, and said, "He loved them to the end." Cardinal Re is the dean of the College of Cardinals. He continued that Holy Thursday,  “reminds us of how much we have been loved." Cardinal Re noted, Jesus loved them with “the highest and unsurpassable degree of His capacity to love.” He explained that Jesus gave gift of the Sacrament of the Eucharist  because “Christ loved us and wanted to be near every one of us forever, even to the end of the world.” The cardinal said this “is the gift through which Christ walks with us as light, as strength, as nourishment, as help in all the days of our history.” “The Eucharist is the center and life of the Church”, Cardinal Re said and so should also be “the center and heart of the life of every Christian as well.” Going further the Cardinal said, “the Eucharist is a reality not only to be believed, but to be lived.” “Those who believe in the Eucharist never feel alone in life,” the Cardinal explained. “They know that in the dimness and in the silence of all the Churches there is Someone who knows their name… And before the tabernacle, everyone can confide whatever is in their heart and receive comfort, strength and peace of heart” Cardinal Re explained that, Christ, our high priest, said: “Do this – that is, the Sacrament of the Eucharist – in memory of me.” On Easter Sunday, he also said to them: “Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven.” The Cardinal indicated that Jesus transmits to His Apostles the powers of the priesthood, “so that the Eucharist and the Sacrament of Pardon might continue and be renewed in the Church. He gave humanity an incomparable gift.”  “In the story of the boundless love of Christ who loved us ‘till the end,’ there is the bitterness of human disloyalty and betrayal,” the Cardinal said. We can thereby gain, according to the cardinal, “joy of His pardon with repentance and with the Sacrament of Reconciliation, and to begin a spiritual recovery with hearts open more to God and to all our brothers and sisters.” 
 Despite the pandemic, “we must continue to pray with our thoughts and our hearts filled with gratitude for Jesus Christ, who wanted to remain present among us as our contemporary under the appearances of bread and wine,” he counseled. Cardinal Re explained that we are to “raise a huge chorus of prayer so that the hand of God might come to our aid and end this tragic situation that has worrying consequences in the fields of health, employment, economy, education, and direct relationships with people.” As to go and "knock loudly on the door of God, the Father Almighty.” 

Pope Francis says "Thanks to the reconciling blood of Jesus, it is a cross that contains the power of Christ’s victory.." FULL TEXT + Video at Chrism Mass



 HOLY CHRISM MASS - FULL TEXT HOMILY OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS at Vatican Basilica

Holy Thursday, 1 April 2021 - 

Mass Booklet at Link : http://www.vatican.va/news_services/liturgy/libretti/2021/20210401-libretto-messa-crismale.pdf

 The Gospel shows us a change of heart among the people who were listening to the Lord. The change was dramatic, and it reveals the extent to which persecution and the cross are linked to the proclamation of the Gospel. The admiration aroused by the grace-filled words spoken by Jesus did not last long in the minds of the people of Nazareth. A comment that someone murmured went insidiously viral: “Is not this Joseph’s son?” (Lk 4:22).

It was one of those ambiguous expressions that are blurted out in passing. One person can use it approvingly to say: “How wonderful that someone of such humble origin speaks with this authority!” Someone else can use it to say in scorn: “And this one, where did he come from? Who does he think he is?” If we think about it, we can hear the same words spoken on the day of Pentecost, when the apostles, filled with the Holy Spirit, began to preach the Gospel. Some said: “Are not all these who are speaking Galileans?” (Acts 2:7). While some received the word, others merely thought that the apostles were drunk.

Strictly speaking, those words spoken in Nazareth might go either way, but if we look at what followed, it is clear that they contained a seed of violence that would then be unleashed against Jesus.

They were “words of justification”,[1] as, for example, when someone says: “That is altogether too much!” and then either attacks the other person or walks away.

This time, the Lord, who at times said nothing or simply walked away, did not let the comment pass. Instead, he laid bare the malevolence concealed in the guise of simple village gossip. “You will quote me the proverb: ‘Physician, heal yourself’. What we have heard that you did in Capernaum, do here also in your own country!” (Lk 4:23). “Heal yourself…”

“Let him save himself”. There is the poison! Those same words will follow the Lord to the cross: “He saved others, let him save himself” (Lk 23:35). “And save us”, one of the thieves will add (cf. v. 39).

As always, the Lord refuses to dialogue with the evil spirit; he only replies in the words of Scripture. The prophets Elijah and Elisha, for their part, were accepted not by their own countrymen but by a Phoenician widow and a Syrian who had contracted leprosy: two foreigners, two people of another religion. This is itself striking and it shows how true was the inspired prophecy of the aged Simeon that Jesus would be a “sign of contradiction (semeion antilegomenon)” (Lk 2:34)[2].

Jesus’ words have the power to bring to light whatever each of us holds in the depths of our heart, often mixed like the wheat and the tares. And this gives rise to spiritual conflict. Seeing the signs of the Lord’s superabundant mercy and hearing the “beatitudes” but also the “woes” found in the Gospel, we find ourselves forced to discern and decide. In this case, Jesus’ words were not accepted and this made the enraged crowd attempt to kill him. But it was not yet his “hour”, and the Lord, so the Gospel tells us, “passing through the midst of them, went away”.

It was not his hour, yet the swiftness with which the crowd’s fury was unleashed, and the ferocity of a rage prepared to kill the Lord on the spot, shows us that it is always his hour. That is what I would like to share with you today, dear priests: that the hour of joyful proclamation, the hour of persecution and the hour of the cross go together.

The preaching of the Gospel is always linked to the embrace of some particular cross. The gentle light of God’s word shines brightly in well-disposed hearts, but awakens confusion and rejection in those that are not. We see this over and over again in the Gospels.

The good seed sown in the field bears fruit – a hundred, sixty and thirty-fold – but it also arouses the envy of the enemy, who is driven to sow weeds during the night (cf. Mt 13:24-30.36-43).

The tender love of the merciful father irresistibly draws the prodigal son home, but also leads to anger and resentment on the part of the elder son (cf. Lk 15:11-32).

The generosity of the owner of the vineyard is a reason for gratitude among the workers called at the last hour, but it also provokes a bitter reaction by one of those called first, who is offended by the generosity of his employer (cf. Mt 20:1-16).

The closeness of Jesus, who dines with sinners, wins hearts like those of Zacchaeus, Matthew and the Samaritan woman, but it also awakens scorn in the self-righteous.

The magnanimity of the king who sends his son, thinking that he will be respected by the tenant farmers, unleashes in them a ferocity beyond all measure. Here we find ourselves before the mystery of iniquity, which leads to the killing of the Just One (cf. Mt 21:33-46).

All this, dear brother priests, enables us to see that the preaching of the Good News is mysteriously linked to persecution and the cross.

Saint Ignatius of Loyola – excuse the “family advertising” – expresses this evangelical truth in his contemplation on the Nativity of the Lord. There he invites us “to see and consider what Saint Joseph and Our Lady did in setting out on their journey so that the Lord could be born in extreme poverty and after many labours – experiencing hunger, thirst, heat and cold, injuries and indignities – die on the Cross, and all this for me”. He then invites us, “in reflecting on this, to draw some spiritual profit” (Spiritual Exercises, 116). The joy of the Lord’s birth; the pain of the Cross; persecution.

What reflection can we make to “draw some profit” for our priestly life by contemplating this early appearance of the cross – of misunderstanding, rejection and persecution – at the beginning and at the very heart of the preaching of the Gospel?

Two thoughts occur to me.

First: we are taken aback to see the cross present in the Lord’s life at the very beginning of his ministry, even before his birth. It is already there in Mary’s initial bewilderment at the message of the angel; it is there in Joseph's sleeplessness, when he felt obliged to send Mary away quietly. It is there in the persecution of Herod and in the hardships endured by the Holy Family, like those of so many other families obliged to live in exile from their homeland.

All this makes us realize that the mystery of the cross is present “from the beginning”. It makes us understand that the cross is not an afterthought, something that happened by chance in the Lord’s life. It is true that all who crucify others throughout history would have the cross appear as collateral damage, but that is not the case: the cross does not appear by chance. The great and small crosses of humanity, the crosses of each of us, do not appear by chance.

Why did the Lord embrace the cross fully and to the end? Why did Jesus embrace his entire Passion: his betrayal and abandonment by his friends after the Last Supper, his illegal arrest, his summary trial and disproportionate sentence, the gratuitous and unjustifiable violence with which he was beaten and spat upon...?  If mere circumstances conditioned the saving power of the cross, the Lord would not have embraced everything. But when his hour came, he embraced the cross fully. For on the cross there can be no ambiguity! The cross is non-negotiable.

A second thought: true, there is an aspect of the cross that is an integral part of our human condition, our limits and our frailty. Yet it is also true that something happens on the Cross that does not have to do with our human weakness but is the bite of the serpent, who, seeing the crucified Lord defenceless, bites him in an attempt to poison and undo all his work. A bite that tries to scandalize – and this is an era of scandals – a bite that seeks to disable and render futile and meaningless all service and loving sacrifice for others. It is the venom of the evil one who keeps insisting: save yourself.

It is in this harsh and painful “bite” that seeks to bring death, that God’s triumph is ultimately seen. Saint Maximus the Confessor tells us that in the crucified Jesus a reversal took place. In biting the flesh of the Lord, the devil did not poison him, for in him he encountered only infinite meekness and obedience to the will of the Father. Instead, caught by the hook of the cross, he devoured the flesh of the Lord, which proved poisonous to him, whereas for us it was to be the antidote that neutralizes the power of the evil one.[3]

These are my reflections. Let us ask the Lord for the grace to profit from this teaching. It is true that the cross is present in our preaching of the Gospel, but it is the cross of our salvation. Thanks to the reconciling blood of Jesus, it is a cross that contains the power of Christ’s victory, which conquers evil and delivers us from the evil one. To embrace it with Jesus and, as he did before us, to go out and preach it, will allow us to discern and reject the venom of scandal, with which the devil wants to poison us whenever a cross unexpectedly appears in our lives.

“But we are not among those who shrink back (hypostoles)” (Heb 10:39), says the author of the Letter to the Hebrews. “We are not among those who shrink back”. This is the advice that the author gives us. We are not scandalized, because Jesus himself was not scandalized by seeing that his joyful preaching of salvation to the poor was not received wholeheartedly, but amid the shouts and threats of those who refused to hear his word or wanted to reduce it to legalisms such as moralism or clericalism.

We are not scandalized because Jesus was not scandalized by having to heal the sick and to set prisoners free amid the moralistic, legalistic and clerical squabbles that arose every time he did some good.

We are not scandalized because Jesus was not scandalized by having to give sight to the blind amid people who closed their eyes in order not to see, or looked the other way.

We are not scandalized because Jesus was not scandalised that his proclamation of a year of grace of the Lord – a year that embraces all of history - provoked a public scandal in matters that today would barely make the third page of a local newspaper.

We are not scandalized because the preaching of the Gospel is effective not because of our eloquent words but because of the power of the cross (cf. 1 Cor 1:17).

The way we embrace the cross in our preaching of the Gospel – with deeds and, when necessary, with words – makes two things clear. That the sufferings that come from the Gospel are not ours, but rather “the sufferings of Christ in us” (2 Cor 1:5), and that “we do not preach ourselves but Jesus Christ as Lord and ourselves as servants of all for the love of Jesus” (2 Cor 4:5).

I would like to end by sharing one of my memories. “Once, at a dark moment in my life, I asked the Lord for the grace to free me from a difficult and complex situation. A dark moment. I had to preach the Spiritual Exercises to some women religious, and on the last day, as was customary in those days, they all went to confession. One elderly Sister came; she had a clear gaze, eyes full of light. A woman of God. At the end of the confession, I felt the urge to ask her a favour, so I said to her, ‘Sister, as your penance pray for me, because I need a particular grace. Ask the Lord for it. If you ask the Lord, surely he will give it to me’. She paused in silence for a moment and seemed to be praying, then she looked at me and said, ‘The Lord will certainly give you that grace, but make no mistake about it: he will give it to you in his own divine way’. This did me much good, hearing that the Lord always gives us what we ask for, but that he does so in his divine way. That way involves the cross. Not for masochism. But for love, love to the very end”.[4]



[1] A master of the spiritual life, Father Claude Judde speaks of expressions that accompany our decisions and contain “the
final word”, the word that prompts a decision and moves a person or a group to act. Cf. C. JUDDE, Oeuvres spirituelles, II, 1883 (Instruction sur la connaissance de soi-même), pp. 313-319), in M. Á. FIORITO, Buscar y hallar la voluntad de Dios, Buenos Aires, Paulinas, 2000, 248 s.

[2] “Antilegomenon” means they would speak in different ways about him: some would speak well of him and others ill.

[3] Cf. Cent. I, 8-13.

[4] Homily at Mass in Santa Marta, 29 May 2013.

Source: Vatican.va - Image Screenshot

Hauntingly Beautiful 'Hear My Prayer, O Lord' by Purcell Sung in Empty Church by Voces 8 Choir

VOCES8 choral group performs Henry Purcell's anthem
'Hear My Prayer, O Lord' at St Stephen Walbrook Church in London.
Hear my prayer, O Lord: and let my crying come unto thee. (Psalm 102:1)
Image Source: Google Images of Gethsemane by Danish : Carl Bloch 1834 -1890, 

Holy Thursday Explained in 3 Minutes - What You Need to Know! Last Supper of Jesus as in the Bible with Church Traditions - VIDEO



Holy Thursday or Maundy Thursday begins the Easter Triduum which includes Good Friday, the Easter Vigil and Easter Day. It starts with the evening Mass of the Lord's Supper. This commemorates when the Eucharist was instituted at the Last Supper by Jesus as mentioned in the Bible. "And He took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me.” (Gospel of Luke chapter 22)

 The traditional English name for this day, "Maundy Thursday", derives from the Latin phrase Mandatum novum — "a new command" (or mandate) — which comes from Christ's words: "A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another; even as I have loved you, that you also love one another" (Gospel of John chapter 13, verse 34). The Gospel reading for the liturgy explains that Jesus washed the feet of the disciples, an act of service (commonly done by slaves or servants during the time) and great humility. In the evening liturgy, the priest, who is persona Christi, will wash the feet of several parishioners, oftentimes catechumens and candidates who will be entering into full communion with the Church at Easter Vigil. The celebrant ceremonially washes the feet of 12 people in memory of Christ’s washing the feet of his disciples.


Earlier on Holy Thursday (or earlier in the week) the bishop celebrates the Chrism Mass, where holy oils are blessed and ordained priests renew their promises to faithfully fulfill their office. The chrism and the oil is to be used in the celebration of the sacraments of initiation in churches throughout the diocese.  Only the bishop can bless the holy chrism oils.

The "Gloria in excelsis" hymn is sung on Holy Thursday although during Lent it is not used. Bells may be rung, and should remain silent until the "Gloria in excelsis" of the Easter Vigil. During this same period the organ and other musical instruments may be used only for the purpose of supporting the singing.

After Mass there is a procession of the Blessed Sacrament to the place of repose; Traditionally "Pange lingua" or some other eucharistic song is used to accompany the Eucharist to the Altar of Repose.  A plenary indulgence is granted to those who sing the Eucharistic hymn “Tantum Ergo” during the accompaniment of the Blessed Sacrament (under the usual conditions).

During the evening liturgy the hosts are consecrated for the communion on Good Friday (when there is no liturgy).

 After the Mass of the Lord's Supper the faithful are encouraged to spend time during the night in the church in prayer of adoration before the Blessed Sacrament which has been solemnly reserved.

After Mass the altar is stripped of the linens. Often crosses in the church be covered with a red or purple veil, unless they have already been veiled on the Saturday before the Fifth Sunday of Lent.


Holy Mass Online - Readings and Video : Thursday, April 1, 2021 - #Eucharist in Your Virtual Church - #HolyThursday Chrism Mass


Holy Thursday
Chrism Mass
Lectionary: 260

Reading I
Is 61:1-3a, 6a, 8b-9
The Spirit of the Lord GOD is upon me,
    because the LORD has anointed me;
He has sent me to bring glad tidings to the lowly,
    to heal the brokenhearted,
To proclaim liberty to the captives
    and release to the prisoners,
To announce a year of favor from the LORD
    and a day of vindication by our God,
    to comfort all who mourn;
To place on those who mourn in Zion
    a diadem instead of ashes,
(Mass starts at the 10:15 Mark on the Video Below)
 
 To give them oil of gladness in place of mourning,
    a glorious mantle instead of a listless spirit.

You yourselves shall be named priests of the LORD,
    ministers of our God shall you be called.

I will give them their recompense faithfully,
    a lasting covenant I will make with them.
Their descendants shall be renowned among the nations,
    and their offspring among the peoples;
All who see them shall acknowledge them
    as a race the LORD has blessed.

Responsorial Psalm
89:21-22, 25 and 27
R.    (2)  For ever I will sing the goodness of the Lord.
“I have found David, my servant;
    with my holy oil I have anointed him.
That my hand may always be with him;
    and that my arm may make him strong.”
R.    For ever I will sing the goodness of the Lord.
“My faithfulness and my mercy shall be with him;
    and through my name shall his horn be exalted.
He shall say of me, ‘You are my father,
    my God, the Rock, my savior!’“
R.    For ever I will sing the goodness of the Lord.

Reading II
Rv 1:5-8
[Grace to you and peace] from Jesus Christ, who is the faithful witness,
the firstborn of the dead and ruler of the kings of the earth.
To him who loves us and has freed us from our sins by his Blood, 
who has made us into a Kingdom, priests for his God and Father, 
to him be glory and power forever and ever. Amen.

    Behold, he is coming amid the clouds,
        and every eye will see him,
        even those who pierced him.
    All the peoples of the earth will lament him.
        Yes. Amen.

“I am the Alpha and the Omega,” says the Lord God, 
“the one who is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty.”

Verse Before the Gospel
Is 61:1 (cited in Lk 4:18)
The Spirit of the LORD is upon me;
for he has sent me to bring glad tidings to the poor.

Gospel
Lk 4:16-21
Jesus came to Nazareth, where he had grown up, 
and went according to his custom
into the synagogue on the sabbath day.
He stood up to read and was handed a scroll of the prophet Isaiah.
He unrolled the scroll and found the passage where it was written:

    The Spirit of the Lord is upon me,
    because he has anointed me
        to bring glad tidings to the poor.
    He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives
        and recovery of sight to the blind,
        to let the oppressed go free,
    and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.

Rolling up the scroll, he handed it back to the attendant and sat down,
     and the eyes of all in the synagogue looked intently at him.
He said to them, 
“Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.”
Prayer to Make a Spiritual Communion-
People who cannot communicate now make spiritual communion
At your feet, O my Jesus I bow down and offer you the repentance of my contrite heart, which abysses itself into its nothingness and Your holy presence. I adore you in the Sacrament of Your love, the ineffable Eucharist. I wish to receive you in the poor home that my heart offers you. In anticipation of the happiness of sacramental communion, I want to possess you in spirit. Come to me, oh my Jesus, that I may come to you. May Your love inflame my whole being, for life and death. I believe in you, I hope in you, I love you. So be it. Amen