Thursday, May 6, 2021

Holy Mass Online - Readings and Video : 1st Friday, May 7, 2021 - #Eucharist in Your Virtual Church - Eastertide



Friday of the Fifth Week of Easter
Lectionary: 289
Reading I
Acts 15:22-31
The Apostles and presbyters, in agreement with the whole Church,
decided to choose representatives
and to send them to Antioch with Paul and Barnabas. 
The ones chosen were Judas, who was called Barsabbas,
and Silas, leaders among the brothers.
This is the letter delivered by them:
“The Apostles and the presbyters, your brothers,
to the brothers in Antioch, Syria, and Cilicia
of Gentile origin: greetings.
Since we have heard that some of our number
who went out without any mandate from us
have upset you with their teachings
and disturbed your peace of mind,
we have with one accord decided to choose representatives
and to send them to you along with our beloved Barnabas and Paul,
who have dedicated their lives to the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.
So we are sending Judas and Silas
who will also convey this same message by word of mouth:
‘It is the decision of the Holy Spirit and of us
not to place on you any burden beyond these necessities,
namely, to abstain from meat sacrificed to idols,
from blood, from meats of strangled animals,
and from unlawful marriage.
If you keep free of these,
you will be doing what is right. Farewell.’“
And so they were sent on their journey.
Upon their arrival in Antioch
they called the assembly together and delivered the letter.
When the people read it, they were delighted with the exhortation. Responsorial Psalm
57:8-9, 10 and 12
R.    (10a)  I will give you thanks among the peoples, O Lord.
or:
R.    Alleluia.
My heart is steadfast, O God; my heart is steadfast;
    I will sing and chant praise.
Awake, O my soul; awake, lyre and harp!
    I will wake the dawn.
R.    I will give you thanks among the peoples, O Lord.
or:
R.    Alleluia.
I will give thanks to you among the peoples, O LORD,
    I will chant your praise among the nations.
For your mercy towers to the heavens,
    and your faithfulness to the skies.
Be exalted above the heavens, O God;
    above all the earth be your glory!
R.    I will give you thanks among the peoples, O Lord.
or:
R.    Alleluia.
Alleluia
Jn 15:15b
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
I call you my friends, says the Lord,
for I have made known to you all that the Father has told me.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Gospel
Jn 15:12-17
Jesus said to his disciples:
“This is my commandment: love one another as I love you.
No one has greater love than this,
to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.
You are my friends if you do what I command you.
I no longer call you slaves,
because a slave does not know what his master is doing.
I have called you friends,
because I have told you everything I have heard from my Father.
It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you
and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain,
so that whatever you ask the Father in my name he may give you.
This I command you: love one another.”
Prayer to Make a Spiritual Communion-
People who cannot communicate now make spiritual communion
At your feet, O my Jesus I bow down and offer you the repentance of my contrite heart, which abysses itself into its nothingness and Your holy presence. I adore you in the Sacrament of Your love, the ineffable Eucharist. I wish to receive you in the poor home that my heart offers you. In anticipation of the happiness of sacramental communion, I want to possess you in spirit. Come to me, oh my Jesus, that I may come to you. May Your love inflame my whole being, for life and death. I believe in you, I hope in you, I love you. So be it. Amen

Saint May 7 : St. John of Beverley a Holy Bishop who Died in 721 in England

St. John of Beverley
BISHOP

Born:
Harpham
Died:
7 May 721, Beverley
Canonized:
1037

This illustrious saint was born at Harpham, a village in the province of the Deiri, which comprised Yorkshire, Lancashire, and the rest of the kingdom of the Northumbers, on the south side of the Tyne; what lay beyond it being called Bernicia. An earnest desire of qualifying himself for the service of God drew him young into Kent, where he made great progress in learning and piety, in the famous school of St. Theodorus, the archbishop, under the direction of the holy abbot Adrian. Afterwards returning into his own country, he pursued the exercises of piety in the monastery of men under St. Hilda at Whithy; till in the beginning of the reign of king Alfred, upon the death of Eata, he was made bishop of Hagulstad, or Hexam. What time he had to spare from his functions he consecrated to heavenly contemplation; retiring for that purpose into the churchyard of St. Michael's, beyond the river Tyne, about a mile and a half from Hagulstad, especially during the forty days of Lent. He was accustomed to take with him some poor person, whom he served during that time. Once in the beginning of a Lent, he took with him a dumb youth, who never had been able to utter one word, and whose head was covered with hideous scabs and scales, without any hair. The saint caused a mansion to be built for this sick youth within his enclosure, and often admitted him into his own cell. On the second Sunday he made the sign of the cross upon his tongue, and loosed it. Then. he taught him to say <Gea>, which signifies in Saxon <Yea>, or <Yes>; then the letters of the alphabet, A, B, C, and afterwards syllables and words. Thus the youth miraculously obtained his speech.
Moreover, by the saint's blessing the remedies prescribed by  a physician whom he employed, his head was entirely healed, and became covered with hair. When St. Wilfred returned from banishment, St. John yielded up to him the see of Hagulstad: but some time after, upon the death of Bosa, a man of great sanctity and humility, as Bede testifies, he was placed in the archiepiscopal chair of York. Venerable Bede, who received the holy orders of deacon and priest at his hands, gives ample testimony to his sanctity; and relates the instantaneous cure of the sick wife of a neighboring thane or lord, by holy water, and several other miracles performed by him, from the testimony of Bercthun, abbot of Beverley, and Herebald, abbot of Tinmouth, who had been eye-witnesses to several of them. St. John made frequent retirement his delight, to renew thereby his spirit of devotion, lest the dissipation of exterior employs should extinguish it.
He chose for his retreat a monastery which he had built at Beverley, then a forest, now a market-town, twenty-seven miles from York. This monastery, according to the custom of those times, he erected for the use of both sexes, and put it under the government of his disciple, Bercthun, or Brithun, first abbot of Beverley, then called Endeirwood, or wood of the Deiri. In 717, being much broken with age and fatigues, he resigned his bishopric to his chaplain, St. Wilfrid the, younger, and having ordained him bishop of York, he retired to Beverley, where he spent the remaining four years of his life in the punctual performance of all monastic duties. He died there the death of the just, on the 7th of May, 721. His successor governed the see of York fifteen years, was a great lover of the beauty of God's house and is named among the saints, April the 29th. The monastery of Beverley having been destroyed by the Danes, king Athelstan, who had obtained a great victory over the Scots by the intercession of St. John, founded in his honor, in the same place, a rich collegiate church of canons.
King Henry V. attributed to the intercession of this saint the glorious victory of Agincourt, on which occasion a synod, in 1416, ordered his festival to be solemnly kept over all England. Henschenius the Bollandist, in the second tome of May, has published four books of the miracles wrought at the relics of Saint John of Beverley, written by eye-witnesses. His sacred bones were honorably translated into the church by Alfric, archbishop of York, in 1037: a feast in honor of which translation was kept at York on the 25th of October.
On the 13th of September, (not the 24th, as Mr. Stevens says,) in 1664, the sexton, digging a grave in the church of Beverley, discovered a vault of freestone, in which was a box of lead, containing several pieces of bones, with some dust, yielding a sweet smell; with inscriptions, by which it appeared that these were the mortal remains of St. John of Beverley, as we read in Dugdale's History of the Collegiate Church of Beverley, who has transcribed them, p. 57. These relics had been hid in the beginning of the reign of king Edward VI. Dugdale and Stevens testify, that they were all reinterred in the middle-alley of the same church. Alcuin had an extraordinary devotion to St. John of Beverley, and in his poem on the saints of York, published by Thomas Gale gives a long history of the miracles wrought by him from verse 1085 to 1215. Rabanus Maurus has placed Alcuin in his Martyrology on the 19th of May, and Henschenius on that day gives his life, and mentions several private Martyrologies in which his name is found, though he has never been anywhere honored in the office of the church. source: TheLives of the Saints:AlbanButler.X8

Saint May 6 : St. Dominic Savio who Died at age 15 and the Patron of Choirboys, Falsely Accused, Juvenile delinquents


Born:
April 2, 1842(1842-04-02), San Giovanni, a frazione of Riva presso Chieri, Piedmont, Italy
March 9, 1857, Mondonio, a frazione of Castelnuovo d’Asti (today Castelnuovo Don Bosco), Piedmont, Italy
12 June 1954 by Pope Pius XII
Major Shrine:
The Basilica of Mary, Help of Christians in Turin (his tomb)
Patron of:
choirboys, falsely accused people, juvenile delinquents,  Pueri Cantores

MYSTIC, YOUTHFUL CONFESSOR, STUDENT OF ST. JOHN BOSCO
Here is a boy-saint who died at the age of fifteen, was one of the great hopes of St. John Bosco for the future of his congregation, and was canonized in 1954. He was one of ten children of Carlo and Birgitta Savio. Carlo was a blacksmith and Birgitta was a seamstress. When Don Bosco was looking for young men to train as priests for his Salesian Order, his parish priest suggested Dominic Savio. Dominic became more than a credit to Don Bosco's school—he single-handedly organized those who were to be the nucleus of Don Bosco's order.
St. Dominic Savio was twelve when he met Don Bosco and organized a group of boys into the Company of the Immaculate Conception. Besides its religious purpose, the boys swept and took care of the school and looked after the boys that no one seemed to pay any attention to. When, in 1859, Don Bosco chose the young men to be the first members of his congregation, all of them had been members of Dominic's Company.
For all that, Dominic was a normal, high-spirited boy who sometimes got into trouble with his teachers because he would often break out laughing. However, he was generally well disciplined and gradually gained the respect of the tougher boys in Don Bosco's school.
In other circumstances, Dominic might have become a little self-righteous snob, but Don Bosco showed him the heroism of the ordinary and the sanctity of common sense. "Religion must be about us as the air we breathe," Don Bosco would say, and Dominic Savio wore holiness like the clothes on his back.
He called his long hours of prayer "his distractions." In 1857, at the age of fifteen, he caught tuberculosis and was sent home to recover. On the evening of March 9, he asked his father to say the prayers for the dying. His face lit up with an intense joy and he said to his father: "I am seeing most wonderful things!" These were his last words.
Thought for the Day: "I can't do big things," St. Dominic Savio once said, "but I want everything to be for the glory of God." His was the way of the ordinary: cheerfulness, fidelity in little things, helping others, playing games, obeying his superiors. This heroism in little things is the stuff of holiness.

(Taken from Catholic Encyclopedia)

Pope Francis says "...to all the Indian people, together with the assurance of my prayers that God will grant healing..." FULL TEXT Message


 
Message of the Holy Father to the Archbishop of Bombay on the Covid-19 health emergency in India, 06.05.2021


The following is the Message sent by the Holy Father Francis to His Eminence Cardinal Oswald Gracias, archbishop of Bombay and president of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of India, regarding the Covid-19 health emergency in the country:

 

Message of the Holy Father

To Cardinal Oswald Gracias
Archbishop of Bombay
President of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of India

At this time when so many in India are suffering as a result of the present health emergency, I am writing to convey my heartfelt solidarity and spiritual closeness to all the Indian people, together with the assurance of my prayers that God will grant healing and consolation to everyone affected by this grave pandemic.

My thoughts go above all to the sick and their families, to those who care for them, and in particular to those who are mourning the loss of their loved ones. I think too of the many doctors, nurses, hospital workers, ambulance drivers and those working tirelessly to respond to the immediate needs of their brothers and sisters. With deep appreciation I invoke upon all of them God’s gifts of perseverance, strength and peace.

In a particular way, I am united to the Catholic community in your country, with gratitude for its works of charity and fraternal solidarity carried out in the service of all; I think especially of the generosity shown by so many committed young people. I join you in commending to the Lord’s infinite mercy the faithful who have lost their lives, not least the great numbers of priests and men and women religious. In these days of immense grief, may we all be consoled in the hope born of Easter and our unshakeable faith in Christ’s promise of resurrection and new life. To all I send my blessing.

Rome, from Saint John Lateran, 6 May 2021

FRANCISCUS


Pope Francis Tells Swiss Guards "I thank the Lord with you, the source of all good, for the various gifts and the various vocations he entrusts to you." FULL TEXT



ADDRESS OF THE HOLY FATHER FRANCIS

TO THE PONTIFICAL SWISS GUARD,
ON THE OCCASION OF THE OATH OF THE NEW GUARDS (FULL MASS Video at Bottom)

Sala Clementina
Thursday, 6 May 2021 

Dear officers and members of the Swiss Guard!

Dear family members!

On the occasion of the swearing in of the recruits, I am pleased to welcome you to the house of the Successor of Peter. I greet Colonel Christoph Graf, who leads the Swiss Guard Corps, the Chaplain, the Officers, the Non-Commissioned Officers and all the members of the Corps with great dedication. I welcome the parents who join this celebration: their presence testifies to the attachment of many Swiss Catholics to the Church, and in particular to the See of Peter.

The places where new recruits are called to serve are loaded with history; since the creation of the Pontifical Swiss Guard, many young people have carried out with commitment and fidelity that particular mission that the Corps continues to carry out today. Some have gone so far as to sacrifice their lives to defend the Pope.

As you well know, the functions of the Swiss Guard, while having a military character, constitute a special service to the Supreme Pontiff and to the Apostolic See for the benefit of the entire Church. It is therefore a reason for great appreciation that young people choose to dedicate a few years of their existence in generous availability to the Successor of Peter and to the ecclesial community. The Lord sometimes calls some of you to follow him on the path of the priesthood or consecrated life, finding available land cultivated precisely during the time of service in the Guard. Others, on the other hand, follow the conjugal vocation and form their own family. I thank the Lord with you, the source of all good, for the various gifts and the various vocations he entrusts to you,

This circumstance gives me the opportunity to publicly thank all members of the Swiss Guard for the diligent performance of their service. I very much appreciate your ability to combine professional and spiritual aspects, thus expressing your devotion and fidelity to the Apostolic See. For their part, pilgrims and tourists who come to Rome have the opportunity to experience the courtesy and helpfulness of the guards at the various entrances of the Vatican City. Never forget these qualities, which represent a beautiful witness and are the sign of the Church's welcome.

I extend my sincere wishes to the young recruits and I hope they can have fruitful spiritual and human experiences both in the Vatican and in the city of Rome. May these years that you will spend here be an opportunity for a deepening of your faith and an even stronger love for the Church. I accompany you with my prayers and I thank you for choosing to make a few years of your life available to the Successor of Peter. You too, please pray for me.

With these sentiments, I wish you a happy feast and I cordially impart my Apostolic Blessing to you present here and to the entire Pontifical Swiss Guard.

Wow the Most Beautiful Ave Maria that Sounds like Heaven! to SHARE #AveMaria

This Breathtaking Motet was by composer Josquin des Prez in the 15th century.
Lyrics: Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, Virgo serena.

Ave cujus conceptio, solemni plena gaudio, celestia, terrestria, nova replet letitia.

Ave cujus nativitas, nostra fuit solemnitas, ut lucifer lux oriens verum solem preveniens.
Ave pia humilitas, sine viro fecunditas,cuius annunciatio nostra fuit salvatio.
Ave vera virginitas,immaculata castitas,cuius purificatio nostra fuit purgatio.
Ave preclara omnibus, angelicis virtutibus, cuius fuit assumptio nostra glorificatio.
O Mater Dei, memento mei. Amen.
SHARE this Beautiful Hymn to Touch a Soul!
Translation
Hail Mary, full of grace, The Lord is with thee, serene Virgin.
Hail, thou whose Conception, Full of great joy,
Fills heaven and earth With new gladness. Hail, thou whose Nativity
Became our great celebration, As the light-bearing Morning Star
anticipates the true Sun. Hail, faithful humility, Fruitful without man,
Whose Annunciation Was our salvation. Hail, true virginity,
Immaculate chastity, Whose Purification Was our cleansing.
Hail, glorious one In all angelic virtues, Whose Assumption
Was our glorification. O Mother of God,
Remember me. Amen.

Pope Francis says "This is the ideal of the new Jerusalem, where all peoples are united in peace..." FULL TEXT World Day of Migrants and Refugees Message


 

MESSAGE OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS

FOR THE 107th WORLD DAY OF MIGRANTS AND REFUGEES 2021

[27 September 2021]

 TOWARDS AN EVER WIDER “WE”

 Dear Brothers and Sisters,

In the Encyclical Fratelli Tutti, I expressed a concern and a hope that remain uppermost in my thoughts: “Once this health crisis passes, our worst response would be to plunge even more deeply into feverish consumerism and new forms of egotistic self-preservation. God willing, after all this, we will think no longer in terms of ‘them’ and ‘those’, but only ‘us’” (No. 35).

For this reason, I have wished to devote the Message for this year’s World Day of Migrants and Refugees to the theme, Towards An Ever Wider “We”, in order to indicate a clear horizon for our common journey in this world.

The history of this “we”

That horizon is already present in God’s creative plan: “God created humankind in his image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them. God blessed them, and God said to them, ‘Be fruitful and multiply’” (Gen 1:27-28). God created us male and female, different yet complementary, in order to form a “we” destined to become ever more numerous in the succession of generations. God created us in his image, in the image of his own triune being, a communion in diversity.

When, in disobedience we turned away from God, he in his mercy wished to offer us a path of reconciliation, not as individuals but as a people, a “we”, meant to embrace the entire human family, without exception: “See, the home of God is among mortals. He will dwell with them; they will be his peoples, and God himself will be with them” (Rev 21:3).

Salvation history thus has a “we” in its beginning and a “we” at its end, and at its centre the mystery of Christ, who died and rose so “that they may all be one” (Jn 17:21). The present time, however, shows that this “we” willed by God is broken and fragmented, wounded and disfigured. This becomes all the more evident in moments of great crisis, as is the case with the current pandemic. Our “we”, both in the wider world and within the Church, is crumbling and cracking due to myopic and aggressive forms of nationalism (cf. Fratelli Tutti, 11) and radical individualism (cf. ibid., 105). And the highest price is being paid by those who most easily become viewed as others: foreigners, migrants, the marginalized, those living on the existential peripheries.

The truth however is that we are all in the same boat and called to work together so that there will be no more walls that separate us, no longer others, but only a single “we”, encompassing all of humanity. Thus I would like to use this World Day to address a twofold appealfirst to the Catholic faithful and then all the men and women of our world, to advance together towards an ever wider “we”.

A Church that is more and more “catholic”

For the members of the Catholic Church, this appeal entails a commitment to becoming ever more faithful to our being “catholic”, as Saint Paul reminded the community in Ephesus: “There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to the one hope of your calling, one Lord, one faith, one baptism” (Eph 4:4-5).

Indeed the Church’s catholicity, her universality, must be embraced and expressed in every age, according to the will and grace of the Lord who promised to be with us always, until the end of the age (cf. Mt 28:20). The Holy Spirit enables us to embrace everyone, to build communion in diversity, to unify differences without imposing a depersonalized uniformity. In encountering the diversity of foreigners, migrants and refugees, and in the intercultural dialogue that can emerge from this encounter, we have an opportunity to grow as Church and to enrich one another. All the baptized, wherever they find themselves, are by right members of both their local ecclesial community and the one Church, dwellers in one home and part of one family.

The Catholic faithful are called to work together, each in the midst of his or her own community, to make the Church become ever more inclusive as she carries out the mission entrusted to the Apostles by Jesus Christ: “As you go, proclaim the good news, ‘The kingdom of heaven has come near.’ Cure the sick, raise the dead, cleanse the lepers, cast out demons. You received without payment; give without payment” (Mt 10:7-8).

In our day, the Church is called to go out into the streets of every existential periphery in order to heal wounds and to seek out the straying, without prejudice or fear, without proselytising, but ready to widen her tent to embrace everyone. Among those dwelling in those existential peripheries, we find many migrants and refugees, displaced persons and victims of trafficking, to whom the Lord wants his love to be manifested and his salvation preached. “The current influx of migrants can be seen as a new “frontier” for mission, a privileged opportunity to proclaim Jesus Christ and the Gospel message at home, and to bear concrete witness to the Christian faith in a spirit of charity and profound esteem for other religious communities. The encounter with migrants and refugees of other denominations and religions represents a fertile ground for the growth of open and enriching ecumenical and interreligious dialogue” (Address to the National Directors of Pastoral Care for Migrants, 22 September 2017).

An ever more inclusive world

I also make this appeal to journey together towards an ever wider “we” to all men and women, for the sake of renewing the human family, building together a future of justice and peace, and ensuring that no one is left behind.

Our societies will have a “colourful” future, enriched by diversity and by cultural exchanges. Consequently, we must even now learn to live together in harmony and peace. I am always touched by the scene in the Acts of the Apostles when, on the day of the Church’s “baptism” at Pentecost, immediately after the descent of the Holy Spirit, the people of Jerusalem hear the proclamation of salvation: “We… Parthians, Medes, Elamites, and residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya belonging to Cyrene, and visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, Cretans and Arabs – in our own languages we hear them speaking about God’s deeds of power” (2:9-11).

This is the ideal of the new Jerusalem (cf. Is 60; Rev 21:3), where all peoples are united in peace and harmony, celebrating the goodness of God and the wonders of creation. To achieve this ideal, however, we must make every effort to break down the walls that separate us and, in acknowledging our profound interconnection, build bridges that foster a culture of encounter. Today’s migration movements offer an opportunity for us to overcome our fears and let ourselves be enriched by the diversity of each person’s gifts. Then, if we so desire, we can transform borders into privileged places of encounter, where the miracle of an ever wider “we” can come about.

I invite all men and women in our world to make good use of the gifts that the Lord has entrusted to us to preserve and make his creation even more beautiful. “A nobleman went to a distant country to get royal power for himself and then return. He summoned ten of his slaves, and gave them ten pounds, and said to them, ‘Do business with these until I come back’” (Lk 19:12-13). The Lord will also demand of us an account of our work! In order to ensure the proper care of our common home, we must become a “we” that is ever wider and more co-responsiblein the profound conviction that whatever good is done in our world is done for present and future generations. Ours must be a personal and collective commitment that cares for all our brothers and sisters who continue to suffer, even as we work towards a more sustainable, balanced and inclusive development. A commitment that makes no distinction between natives and foreigners, between residents and guests, since it is a matter of a treasure we hold in common, from whose care and benefits no one should be excluded.

The dream begins

The prophet Joel predicted that the messianic future would be a time of dreams and visions inspired by the Spirit: “I will pour out my spirit on all flesh; your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall dream dreams, and your young men shall see visions” (Joel 2:28). We are called to dream together, fearlessly, as a single human family, as companions on the same journey, as sons and daughters of the same earth that is our common home, sisters and brothers all (cf. Fratelli Tutti, 8).

Prayer

Holy, beloved Father,
your Son Jesus taught us
that there is great rejoicing in heaven
whenever someone lost is found,
whenever someone excluded, rejected or discarded
is gathered into our “we”,
which thus becomes ever wider.

We ask you to grant the followers of Jesus,
and all people of good will,
the grace to do your will on earth.
Bless each act of welcome and outreach
that draws those in exile
into the “we” of community and of the Church,
so that our earth may truly become
what you yourself created it to be:
the common home of all our brothers and sisters. Amen.

Rome, Saint John Lateran, 3 May 2021
Feast of Saints Philip and James, Apostles

 

Franciscus

#BreakingNews Young Missionary Collaborator Dies in Car Explosion Near Mission in Central Africa



AFRICA/CENTRAL AFRICA - A young missionary collaborator dies in the car explosion in the Niem Mission

Thursday, 6 May 2021

Bangui (Agenzia Fides) - A young missionary collaborator is the only victim of the explosion of a mine that exploded under the car of the Catholic Mission of Niem. "Fr. Arialdo Urbani and one of his members of the Mission were on the way to the village of Kolo to attend a school run by the Mission", said Bishop Mirosław Gucwa of Bouar in an interview with Fides. "When preparing to return to Niem, another collaborator of the Mission, the young man in charge of the village dispensary, had asked to be taken to visit his sister, who is admitted to the Mission hospital. Despite Father Arialdo's warnings about the risk of mines on the road, he insisted on asking for a ride". "Unfortunately – the Bishop continues - 10 km from Niem, near the village of Zakau, the mission car drove on the mine, and this young man died. The other collaborator of the mission suffered minor injuries, while Fr. Arialdo, who was driving, sustained serious but not life-threatening injuries. He is in the mission hospital and it is being considered whether he should be brought to Bouar in a helicopter of the UN mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA)". "Fortunately, the bomb that hit the missionaries car was relatively low-explosive. If it had been an anti-tank mine, we would now mourn three victims", says Archbishop Gucwa, according to whom the missionaries' car is the third car hit by mines along the road between Niem and Kolo. "The first to be hit by a mine was a surviving businessman's car. There were Russian citizens in a second car", said the bishop. According to the local press, residents of the region suspect both the rebels of the Coalition des Patriotes pour le Changement (CPC) and the Russian mercenaries operating in Central Africa in connection with these episodes. The Catholic Mission of Niem is entrusted to the Congregation of the Sacred Heart of Jesus of Betharram (Societas Presbyterorum Sacratissimi Cordis Iesu de Bétharram), called until 2011 the Congregation of Priests of the Sacred Heart of Jesus of Betharram). "The priests of Betharram have been in Niem for 30 years", explains Mgr. Gucwa. "Together with Fr. Arialdo, who is a parish priest and takes care of schools, and Fr. Tiziano Pozzi, who is a doctor and takes care of the hospital and dispensaries in the villages, Fr. Marie-Paulin is the second Central African priest of the order. The mission runs a small hospital in Niem, with an operating room and a maternity ward, a kindergarten and a primary school, also attended by several Muslim students. In addition, there are primary schools for missionaries in various villages in the region". The missionaries are joined by the Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart, present in the Central African Republic since 1989, they are involved in two communities (Niem - Maigaro): in health care; in early literacy; in the rural animation service in numerous villages; in the promotion of women, including a vocational school for women. (L.M.) (FULL TEXT Release: Agenzia Fides, 6/5/2021)Market Square Photo by LM TP via Flickr Creative Common


Pope Francis says "May God bless you all and may the Virgin keep you." in Message on Feast of Our Lady of Lujan to Argentina - FULL TEXT


 

VIDEO MESSAGE OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS

ON THE OCCASION OF THE FEAST OF OUR LADY OF LUJÁN,
PATRONESS OF ARGENTINA

 

In the month of May, the month of Mary, 8 May, I look towards Lujan.

I wish to be close to you on Friday 7, in the vigils, when all you bishops will gather to pray the Rosary for the health of the Argentine people. I will accompany you from here. And also on Saturday 8, when there will be the Rosary from the Shrine, to be held that day at 13.00, and at 19.00 with the Mass for the change of the cloak. In that Mass I know you will be convened to prepare together the novenary of 2030 to celebrate 400 years since the miracle. It is a very long journey, but one that goes by quickly, one that must be done. A journey to commemorate what the Virgin did there, she wanted to stay there. A journey of memory, of years and years of pilgrimage, of searching, of miracles, of daughters and sons who journey to see the mother.

May memory be your guide in this encounter, because strong memory guarantees a sure future. Remember all that the Virgin has accomplished in your homeland. Let yourselves be accompanied by Her, and accompany her in her journey. May God bless you all and may the Virgin keep you. And please, do not forget to pray for me. Thank you.


Bulletin of the Holy See Press Office6 May 2021

Saint May 6 : St. François de Laval - 1st Bishop of Canada who was Dedicated to Prayer and Died in 1708 in Quebec


Saint François de Laval
Born in France from a noble background in 1623, François de Laval was trained and educated by the Jesuits. During those formative years he learned about the order’s missionaries in North America and was impressed by their missionary zeal. He was ordained a diocesan priest in 1647. After spending more than a year in Rome training to become an apostolic vicar to missionary regions in Asia, Father Laval returned to France and spent three years living in a retreat house. He was known as a man dedicated to prayer and works of charity, a man of great piety but also of unusually great competence in business matters.

Because of these qualities, in 1658 he was appointed as apostolic vicar to New France and was then ordained a bishop. From the very beginning Laval was regarded as a devoted pastor, generous with the poor, whose life was marked by simplicity and poverty. In 1674, Bishop Laval successfully requested that the Holy See erect a separate diocese — the first in the New World north of Mexico — encompassing most of North America.

Parishes and hospitals were built under his direction and in 1663 he founded the Grand Seminary to support the Church of New France by training future priests and leaders. The seminary eventually evolved into Laval University, the oldest institution of higher education in Canada. His ecclesiastical position required that he be involved in a certain amount of colonial politics, and he was never afraid to disregard civil authority when needed. He boldly defended civil rights in the New World, especially among the natives. As his health began to decline, he resigned his office in 1688. He spent several years in retirement caring for the poor and living a life of prayer. He died in 1708. He was beatified by pope John Paul II in 1980 and canonised by Pope Francis April 3, 2014.

LINK: http://www.francoisdelaval.com​
Source : crc-canada.org