Sunday, November 11, 2018

Free Catholic Movie - Hollywood "Scarlet and the Black" with Gregory Peck - True Story


YOUTUBE ABOUT SHARE: The Scarlet and the Black is a 1983 made for TV movie starring Gregory Peck and Christopher Plummer. Based on J. P. Gallagher's book The Scarlet Pimpernel of the Vatican (published in 1967), this movie tells the story of Monsignor Hugh O'Flaherty, a real life Irish Catholic priest who saved thousands of Jews and Allied POWs in Nazi-occupied Rome.
The film epilogue states that Kappler was sentenced to life imprisonment, but was frequently visited in prison by O'Flaherty, eventually becoming a Catholic and being baptized at his hands in 1959.
Monsignor Hugh O'Flaherty was a real Irish priest and Vatican official, accredited with saving 6,500 Jews and Allied prisoners.
Herbert Kappler was sentenced to life imprisonment, and did convert to Catholicism after several years, partly under the influence of his war-time opponent Hugh O'Flaherty, who often visited Kappler in prison, discussing religion and literature with him. He was eventually transferred to a prison hospital on account of poor health. It was there that he escaped imprisonment by being smuggled out in a suitcase by his wife (Kappler weighed less than 105 pounds at the time). He escaped to West Germany, where he eventually died at age 70 in 1978.
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Saintly Catholic Army Chaplain Father Emil Kapaun was Awarded Medal of Honor and served even as POW - SHARE his Story!


Emil Joseph Kapaun was a Catholic priest and U.S. Army Chaplain born in the small Czech farming community of Pilsen, Kansas, on Holy Thursday, April 20, 1916. Growing up he was much like any other hardworking farm boy, but he was especially mindful of God and others.  At first feeling the call to become a missionary priest, under the direction of his local parish priest he decided to enter the seminary for the Diocese of Wichita and was ordained a priest on June 9, 1940. After a few years of service in the Diocese, he answered the call for chaplains during World War II and entered the U.S. Army Chaplain Corps in 1944. After traversing thousands of miles to serve the troops in Burma and India, he returned home from the service in 1946.  After two years he re-entered the Army in 1948 and was sent to Japan the following year.


In July of 1950 Chaplain Kapaun was among the first troops to be sent to help protect South Korea, which a few weeks earlier had been invaded by the North.  It was in Korea that he gained a reputation for his bravery in ministering to the soldiers in the foxholes and in the thick of battle. As Chaplain Kapaun's unit, the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, pushed it's way up towards the northern border of North Korea, it was ambushed by the large Chinese Army that was just entering the war.  Here, at the Battle of Unsan, on November 2, Kapaun once again traversed all over the ragged battlefield to rescue men or give them Last Rites.  He showed his dedication to his "boys" as he chose to remain with a number of wounded men rather than escape.  Captured by the enemy, they were forced to march over 60 miles to the prison camp in the bitter cold.  Along the way, Father Kapaun carried his wounded comrades and encouraged them to do likewise. In the seven months in prison, Father Kapaun spent himself in heroic service to his fellow prisoners without regard for race, color or creed, giving them help and hope when they needed it most.
To this there is testimony of men of all faiths. Ignoring his own ill health, he nursed the sick and wounded, stole food for the hungry, picked lice off of men, washed dirty and soiled clothing, and encouraged men with words and prayers to keep fighting because they would eventually make it out of the camp.  Finally a blood clot in his leg and pneumonia prevented his daily rounds. Moved to a so-called hospital, but denied medical assistance, his death soon followed on May 23, 1951.  Two years later several hundred Prisoners of War were released, including some that carried with them a beautiful crucifix that was carved by a Jewish POW who was inspired by tales of Father Kapaun's deeds.  These Prisoners testified to Father Kapaun's role in their survival and began to tell the world about their heroic chaplain.
On April 11, 2013, Chaplain Kapaun was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Barack Obama.  Only one of 5 chaplains to receive the nation's highest award, he is also the most decorated chaplain in U.S. history.  The Church continues to seek honors for Father Kapaun, as the Diocese of Wichita and the Vatican have begun the formal process that could lead to Father Kapaun's Canonization as a saint. In 1993, it was announced that Father Kapaun would receive the title of "Servant of God".  In late 2015, the "Positio" on his life and virtues was presented to the Congregation for Saints at the Vatican, which began to review it in 2016.  If the Congregation and the Holy Father declare that Kapaun lived with certainty a life of Heroic Virtue, he will be given the title "Venerable", and the door will be opened to review the potential miracle attributed to his intercession needed for his Beatification.  After this takes place, another miracle will be required for his Canonization.
We hope that you are as inspired by Father Kapaun's life and example as we are, and that you join us in praying for his Beatification and Canonization.  
Text Source: http://fatherkapaun.org - Images source Google Images

Pope Francis "...the First World War is a severe warning for everyone to reject the culture of war and to seek every legitimate means to put an end to the conflicts....invest on peace, not on war!" FULL TEXT + Video


ANGELUS

St. Peter's Square
Sunday 11 November 2018


Dear brothers and sisters, good morning!

Today's Gospel episode (cf. Mk 12: 38-44) closes the series of teachings given by Jesus in the temple of Jerusalem and emphasizes two opposing figures: the scribe and the widow. But why are they opposed? The scribe represents important, rich, influential people; the other - the widow - represents the last, the poor, the weak. In reality, the resolute judgment of Jesus towards the scribes does not concern the whole category, but refers to those among them who flaunt their social position, they bear the title of "rabbi", ie teacher, they love being revered and occupying the first places (see verses 38-39). What is worse is that their ostentation is above all of a religious nature, because they pray - Jesus says - "for a long time to be seen" (v.40) and use God to be accredited as the defenders of his law. And this attitude of superiority and vanity leads them to contempt for those who count little or are in a disadvantageous economic position, such as the case of widows.

Jesus unmasks this perverse mechanism: denounces the oppression of the weak made instrumentally on the basis of religious motivations, clearly saying that God is on the side of the last. And to impress this lesson well in the minds of the disciples, he offers them a living example: a poor widow whose social position was irrelevant because she lacked a husband who could defend her rights, and which therefore became easy prey to some unscrupulous creditor, because these creditors persecuted the weak to pay them. This woman, who goes to lay in the treasury of the temple only two coins, all that remained and makes her offer trying to go unnoticed, almost ashamed. But, precisely in this humility, she performs an act charged with great religious and spiritual significance. That gesture full of sacrifice does not escape the gaze of Jesus, who indeed sees in it shine the total gift of self to which he wants to educate his disciples.

The teaching that Jesus offers us today helps us to recover what is essential in our life and fosters a concrete and daily relationship with God. Brothers and sisters, the scales of the Lord are different from ours. He weighs people and their gestures differently: God does not measure quantity but quality, searches the heart, looks at the purity of intentions. This means that our "giving" to God in prayer and to others in love should always shy away from ritualism and formalism, as well as from the logic of calculation, and must be an expression of gratuitousness, as Jesus did with us: he saved us for free; he did not make us pay redemption. He saved us for free. And we must do things as an expression of gratuitousness. This is why Jesus indicates that poor and generous widow as a model of Christian life to be imitated. We do not know the name of her, but we know her heart - we will find her in Heaven and we will go to greet her, surely -; and that is what counts before God. When we are tempted by the desire to appear and to account for our gestures of altruism, when we are too interested in the gaze of others and - allow me to speak - when we do "peacocks", we think of this woman. It will do us good: it will help us to get rid of the superfluous to go to what really matters, and to remain humble.

The Virgin Mary, a poor woman who gave herself totally to God, sustains us in the purpose of giving the Lord and our brothers not something of ourselves, but ourselves, in a humble and generous offering.



After the Angelus

Dear brothers and sisters,

Yesterday, in Barcelona, ​​the Beatification of Father Teodoro Illera del Olmo and fifteen fellow martyrs took place. These are thirteen consecrated persons and three lay faithful. At the Congregation of San Pietro in Vincoli belonged nine religious and lay people; three religious were Capuchins of the Mother of the Divine Shepherd and a Franciscan era of the Sacred Heart. These new blesseds were all killed for their faith, in different places and dates, during the war and religious persecution of the last century in Spain. We praise the Lord for these courageous witnesses and applause for them!

Today is the centenary of the end of the First World War, which my predecessor Benedict XV called "useless slaughter". For this reason today, at 13.30 Italian time, bells will ring all over the world, even those of St. Peter's Basilica. The historical page of the First World War is a severe warning for everyone to reject the culture of war and to seek every legitimate means to put an end to the conflicts that still plague many regions of the world. It seems we do not learn. While we pray for all the victims of that terrible tragedy, let us say forcefully: invest on peace, not on war! And, as an emblematic sign, we take that of the great Saint Martin of Tours, which we remember today: he cut his cloak in two to share it with a poor man. This gesture of human solidarity indicates to all the way to build peace. Next Sunday the World Day of the Poor will be celebrated, with many initiatives of evangelization, prayer and sharing. Here too, in San Pietro Square, a health garrison has been set up which will offer treatment to those in need for a week. I hope that this Day will foster a growing attention to the needs of the last, the marginalized, the hungry. I thank all of you who have come from Rome, from Italy and from many parts of the world. I greet the faithful of MengĂ­bar (Spain), those of Barcelona, ​​the group of the Immaculate Heart of Mary from Brazil, and that of the World Catholic Teachers Union. I greet the ACLI tourist center of Trento, the faithful of San Benedetto Po and the confirmers of Chiuppano. I also greet the many Poles I see here. There are many! I wish everyone a good Sunday. Please do not forget to pray for me. Good lunch and goodbye!

Sunday Mass Online : Sunday November 11, 2018 - Readings + Video - 32nd Ord. Time - B - #Eucharist


Thirty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 155

Reading 11 KGS 17:10-16

In those days, Elijah the prophet went to Zarephath.
As he arrived at the entrance of the city,
a widow was gathering sticks there; he called out to her,
"Please bring me a small cupful of water to drink." 
She left to get it, and he called out after her,
"Please bring along a bit of bread." 
She answered, "As the LORD, your God, lives,
I have nothing baked; there is only a handful of flour in my jar
and a little oil in my jug. 
Just now I was collecting a couple of sticks,
to go in and prepare something for myself and my son;
when we have eaten it, we shall die." 
Elijah said to her, "Do not be afraid. 
Go and do as you propose.
But first make me a little cake and bring it to me. 
Then you can prepare something for yourself and your son. 
For the LORD, the God of Israel, says,
'The jar of flour shall not go empty,
nor the jug of oil run dry,
until the day when the LORD sends rain upon the earth.'" 
She left and did as Elijah had said. 
She was able to eat for a year, and he and her son as well;
the jar of flour did not go empty,
nor the jug of oil run dry,
as the LORD had foretold through Elijah.

Responsorial PsalmPS 146:7, 8-9, 9-10

R. (1b) Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
The LORD keeps faith forever,
secures justice for the oppressed,
gives food to the hungry.
The LORD sets captives free.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
The LORD gives sight to the blind;
the LORD raises up those who were bowed down.
The LORD loves the just;
the LORD protects strangers.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
The fatherless and the widow he sustains,
but the way of the wicked he thwarts.
The LORD shall reign forever;
your God, O Zion, through all generations. Alleluia.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.

Reading 2HEB 9:24-28

Christ did not enter into a sanctuary made by hands,
a copy of the true one, but heaven itself,
that he might now appear before God on our behalf. 
Not that he might offer himself repeatedly,
as the high priest enters each year into the sanctuary
with blood that is not his own;
if that were so, he would have had to suffer repeatedly
from the foundation of the world. 
But now once for all he has appeared at the end of the ages
to take away sin by his sacrifice. 
Just as it is appointed that human beings die once,
and after this the judgment, so also Christ,
offered once to take away the sins of many,
will appear a second time, not to take away sin
but to bring salvation to those who eagerly await him.

AlleluiaMT 5:3

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Blessed are the poor in spirit,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMK 12:38-44

In the course of his teaching Jesus said to the crowds,
"Beware of the scribes, who like to go around in long robes
and accept greetings in the marketplaces,
seats of honor in synagogues, 
and places of honor at banquets.
They devour the houses of widows and, as a pretext
recite lengthy prayers. 
They will receive a very severe condemnation."

He sat down opposite the treasury
and observed how the crowd put money into the treasury. 
Many rich people put in large sums.
A poor widow also came and put in two small coins worth a few cents. 
Calling his disciples to himself, he said to them,
"Amen, I say to you, this poor widow put in more
than all the other contributors to the treasury. 
For they have all contributed from their surplus wealth,
but she, from her poverty, has contributed all she had,
her whole livelihood."

OrMK 12:41-44


Jesus sat down opposite the treasury
and observed how the crowd put money into the treasury. 
Many rich people put in large sums. 
A poor widow also came and put in two small coins worth a few cents.
Calling his disciples to himself, he said to them,
"Amen, I say to you, this poor widow put in more
than all the other contributors to the treasury.
For they have all contributed from their surplus wealth,
but she, from her poverty, has contributed all she had,
her whole livelihood."

What is Veterans' or Remembrance Day - 5 things to SHARE - Wear a #Poppy and #Prayers


1. On November 11, many people wear a red poppy in memory of the war veterans and victims. It was at 11 o'clock on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918 that the Armistice was signed signaling the end of World War I. 
2. At that point the guns stopped after 4 years of war. 
3.Remembrance Day was instituted by King George the V in 1919 and is celebrated in Commonwealth countries. In the USA it is celebrated as Veteran's Day. 
4.The red from the Poppy flower, which grew over several battlefields, sybolized the blood shed by the troops. 
5. The Poppy comes from the famous poem of remembrance: (IMAGE SOURCE : THE GUARDIAN/GOOGLE)
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

- John McCrae
Let us pray for these victims and all victims of war. May we learn to live in peace with one another and with God.
FROM USCCB OFFICIAL PRAYERS FOR WAR 

Prayers in a Time of War

  1. For Troops
    All-powerful and ever-living God,
    when Abraham left his native land
    and departed from his people
    you kept him safe through all his journeys.
    Protect these soldiers.
    Be their constant companion and their strength in battle,
    their refuge in every adversity.
    Guide them, O Lord, that they may return home in safety.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.
  2. Prayer of a Spouse for a Soldier
    God of power and might,
    at every moment and in every place
    you are near to those who call upon your name in faith.
    In marriage you have blessed us with a share in your divine love.
    Look upon my husband/wife and keep him/her in your safekeeping,
    no matter where the road may lead.
    And when the battle is ended,
    bring him/her safely home to those who love him.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.
  3. Prayer of a Parent for a Soldier
    Father all-powerful and ever-loving God,
    from before we were born,
    your love has nurtured and sustained us.
    Hear my prayer for N., my son/daughter.
    Keep him/her safe in time of battle
    and faithful to you, day in and day out.
    Bring him/her safely home to those who love him/her.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.
  4. For Government Leaders
    God of power and might, wisdom and justice,
    through you authority is rightly administered,
    laws are enacted, and judgment is decreed.
    Assist with your spirit of counsel and fortitude
    the President and other government leaders of these United States.
    May they always seek
    the ways of righteousness, justice and mercy.
    Grant that they may be enabled by your powerful protection
    to lead our country with honesty and integrity.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.
  5. For the Safety of Soldiers
    Almighty and eternal God,
    those who take refuge in you will be glad
    and forever will shout for joy.
    Protect these soldiers as they discharge their duties.
    Protect them with the shield of your strength
    and keep them safe from all evil and harm.
    May the power of your love enable them to return home
    in safety, that with all who love them,
    they may ever praise you for your loving care.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.
  6. For our Enemies
    Jesus, Prince of Peace,
    you have asked us to love our enemies
    and pray for those who persecute us.
    We pray for our enemies and those who oppose us.
    With the help of the Holy Spirit,
    may all people learn to work together
    for that justice which brings true and lasting peace.
    To you be glory and honor for ever and ever.
  7. For Deceased Veterans
  8. O God, by whose mercy the faithful departed find rest,
  9. look kindly on your departed veterans who gave their
    lives in the service of their country.
    Grant that through the passion, death, and resurrection of your Son
    they may share in the joy of your heavenly kingdom
    and rejoice in you with your saints forever.
    We ask this through Christ our Lord.