Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Feast August 15 : Assumption of Mary into Heaven : #Solemnity #Assumption


The Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 15 August; also called in old liturgical books Pausatio, Nativitas (for heaven), Mors, Depositio, Dormitio S. Mariae. This feast has a double object: (1) the happy departure of Mary from this life; (2) the assumption of her body into heaven. It is the principal feast of the Blessed Virgin. (This is a Holy Day of Obligation in the USA- meaning you have to attend Mass)
SEE ALSO: Novena to Our Lady : Official for #Assumption Feast - Plenary #Indulgence - SHARE
http://www.catholicnewsworld.com/2017/08/novena-to-our-lady-official-for.html
The fact of the Assumption
Regarding the day, year, and manner of Our Lady's death, nothing certain is known. The earliest known literary reference to the Assumption is found in the Greek work De Obitu S. Dominae. Catholic faith, however, has always derived our knowledge of the mystery from Apostolic Tradition. Epiphanius (d. 403) acknowledged that he knew nothing definite about it (Haer., lxxix, 11). The dates assigned for it vary between three and fifteen years after Christ's Ascension. Two cities claim to be the place of her departure: Jerusalem and Ephesus. Common consent favours Jerusalem, where her tomb is shown; but some argue in favour of Ephesus. The first six centuries did not know of the tomb of Mary at Jerusalem. The belief in the corporeal assumption of Mary is founded on the apocryphal treatise De Obitu S. Dominae, bearing the name of St. John, which belongs however to the fourth or fifth century. It is also found in the book De Transitu Virginis, falsely ascribed to St. Melito of Sardis, and in a spurious letter attributed to St. Denis the Areopagite. If we consult genuine writings in the East, it is mentioned in the sermons of St. Andrew of Crete, St. John Damascene, St. Modestus of Jerusalem and others. In the West, St. Gregory of Tours (De gloria mart., I, iv) mentions it first. The sermons of St. Jerome and St. Augustine for this feast, however, are spurious. St. John of Damascus (P.G., I, 96) thus formulates the tradition of the Church of Jerusalem:
St. Juvenal, Bishop of Jerusalem, at the Council of Chalcedon (451), made known to the Emperor Marcian and Pulcheria, who wished to possess the body of the Mother of God, that Mary died in the presence of all the Apostles, but that her tomb, when opened, upon the request of St. Thomas, was found empty; wherefrom the Apostles concluded that the body was taken up to heaven.
Today, the belief in the corporeal assumption of Mary is universal in the East and in the West; according to Benedict XIV (De Festis B.V.M., I, viii, 18) it is a probable opinion, which to deny were impious and blasphemous.
The feast of the Assumption
Regarding the origin of the feast we are also uncertain. It is more probably the anniversary of the dedication of some church than the actual anniversary of Our Lady's death. That it originated at the time of the Council of Ephesus, or that St. Damasus introduced it in Rome is only a hypothesis.
According to the life of St. Theodosius (d. 529) it was celebrated in Palestine before the year 500, probably in August (Baeumer, Brevier, 185). In Egypt and Arabia, however, it was kept in January, and since the monks of Gaul adopted many usages from the Egyptian monks (Baeumer, Brevier, 163), we find this feast in Gaul in the sixth century, in January [mediante mense undecimo (Greg. Turon., De gloria mart., I, ix)]. The Gallican Liturgy has it on the 18th of January, under the title: Depositio, Assumptio, or Festivitas S. Mariae (cf. the notes of Mabillon on the Gallican Liturgy, P.L., LXXII, 180). This custom was kept up in the Gallican Church to the time of the introduction of the Roman rite. In the Greek Church, it seems, some kept this feast in January, with the monks of Egypt; others in August, with those of Palestine; wherefore the Emperor Maurice (d. 602), if the account of the "Liber Pontificalis" (II, 508) be correct, set the feast for the Greek Empire on 15 August.
In Rome (Batiffol, Brev. Rom., 134) the oldest and only feast of Our Lady was 1 January, the octave of Christ's birth. It was celebrated first at Santa Maria Maggiore, later at Santa Maria ad Martyres. The other feasts are of Byzantine origin. Duchesne thinks (Origines du culte chr., 262) that before the seventh century no other feast was kept at Rome, and that consequently the feast of the Assumption, found in the sacramentaries of Gelasius and Gregory, is a spurious addition made in the eighth or seventh century. Probst, however (Sacramentarien, 264 sqq.), brings forth good arguments to prove that the Mass of the Blessed Virgin Mary, found on the 15th of August in the Gelasianum, is genuine, since it does not mention the corporeal assumption of Mary; that, consequently, the feast was celebrated in the church of Santa Maria Maggiore at Rome at least in the sixth century. He proves, furthermore, that the Mass of the Gregorian Sacramentary, such as we have it, is of Gallican origin (since the belief in the bodily assumption of Mary, under the influence of the apocryphal writings, is older in Gaul than in Rome), and that it supplanted the old Gelasian Mass. At the time of Sergius I (700) this feast was one of the principal festivities in Rome; the procession started from the church of St. Hadrian. It was always a double of the first class and a Holy Day of obligation. The octave was added in 847 by Leo IV; in Germany this octave was not observed in several dioceses up to the time of the Reformation. The Church of Milan has not accepted it up to this day (Ordo Ambros., 1906). The octave is privileged in the dioceses of the provinces of Sienna, Fermo, Michoacan, etc.
The Greek Church continues this feast to 23 August, inclusive, and in some monasteries of Mount Athos it is protracted to 29 August (Menaea Graeca, Venice, 1880), or was, at least, formerly. In the dioceses of Bavaria a thirtieth day (a species of month's mind) of the Assumption was celebrated during the Middle Ages, 13 Sept., with the Office of the Assumption (double); today, only the Diocese of Augsburg has retained this old custom.
Some of the Bavarian dioceses and those of Brandenburg, Mainz, Frankfort, etc., on 23 Sept. kept the feast of the "Second Assumption", or the "Fortieth Day of the Assumption" (double) believing, according to the revelations of St. Elizabeth of Schönau (d. 1165) and of St. Bertrand, O.C. (d. 1170), that the B.V. Mary was taken up to heaven on the fortieth day after her death (Grotefend, Calendaria 2, 136). The Brigittines kept the feast of the "Glorification of Mary" (double) 30 Aug., since St. Brigitta of Sweden says (Revel., VI, l) that Mary was taken into heaven fifteen days after her departure (Colvenerius, Cal. Mar., 30 Aug.). In Central America a special feast of the Coronation of Mary in heaven (double major) is celebrated 18 August. The city of Gerace in Calabria keeps three successive days with the rite of a double first class, commemorating: 15th of August, the death of Mary; 16th of August, her Coronation. At Piazza, in Sicily, there is a commemoration of the Assumption of Mary (double second class) the 20th of February, the anniversary of the earthquake of 1743. A similar feast (double major with octave) is kept at Martano, Diocese of Otranto, in Apulia, 19th of November. Note: By promulgating the Bull Munificentissimus Deus, 1 November, 195
Text Catholic Encyclopedia 

#BreakingNews 22 People Killed as Major Bridge in Genoa, Italy collapses - Please Pray

The Morandi bridge collapsed on August 14, 2018 in Genoa, Italy. The search and rescue operations will continue for days. Some people are still missing, based on the number of vehicles on the bridge when it collapsed. According to reports there were about 25 and 30 cars on the bridge when it collapsed, as well as three to four trucks. 22 people were killed in this bridge collapse, according to the Italian prime minister. Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte explained that 16 people were injured, nine of them in serious condition. Morandi Bridge is a highway bridge with section A10 crossing over roads, railway tracks, shopping centers, homes and the Polcevera river.The bridge links central Genoa with Genoa airport. The bridge had a total length of 1.1 kilometers and is 100 meters tall at its peak. Morandi bridge is 50 years old and is also known as the Polcevera Viaduct; it was completed in 1968. Please Pray for the victims and their families.

#BreakingNews US Catholic Bishops FULL Text Release on Grand Jury Report of Abuse of 1,000

President of U.S. Bishops' Conference and Committee Chairman Response to Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report

August 14, 2018
WASHINGTON—Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, is hosting a series of meetings this week responding to the broader issue of safe environments within the Church. An update will be offered upon their conclusion.
In response to today's Pennsylvania grand jury report, Cardinal DiNardo joins Bishop Timothy L. Doherty of Lafayette in Indiana, in issuing the following joint statement. Bishop Doherty is Chairman for the USCCB's Committee for the Protection of Children and Young People.
The full statement follows:
"The report of the Pennsylvania grand jury again illustrates the pain of those who have been victims of the crime of sexual abuse by individual members of our clergy, and by those who shielded abusers and so facilitated an evil that continued for years or even decades. We are grateful for the courage of the people who aided the investigation by sharing their personal stories of abuse. As a body of bishops, we are shamed by and sorry for the sins and omissions by Catholic priests and Catholic bishops.
We are profoundly saddened each time we hear about the harm caused as a result of abuse, at the hands of a clergyman of any rank. The USCCB Committee for the Protection of Children and Young People and the office of the Secretariat of Child and Youth Protection will continue to offer avenues to healing for those who have been abused. We are committed to work in determined ways so that such abuse cannot happen.
The Pennsylvania grand jury report covers a span of more than 70 years. In 2002 the U.S. Catholic bishops adopted the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, which commits us to respond promptly and compassionately to victims, report the abuse of minors, remove offenders and take ongoing action to prevent abuse. This Charter was revised and updated in 2011 and again in 2018. We pledge to maintain transparency and to provide for the permanent removal of offenders from ministry and to maintain safe environments for everyone.  All policies and procedures regarding training and background check requirements are made publicly available by dioceses and eparchies. 
We pray that all survivors of sexual abuse find healing, comfort and strength in God's loving presence as the Church pledges to continue to restore trust through accompaniment, communion, accountability and justice."       
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Above is the FULL TEXT Release from the USCCB
Please Find Below Related Information also from the Diocese of Pittsburgh
Shortened Official Press Briefing: (Warning uses Graphic Depictions)


#BreakingNews Diocese of Pittsburgh, PA - FULL Text Release on 1,000 Abuse findings by Grand Jury
http://www.catholicnewsworld.com/2018/08/breakingnews-diocese-of-pittsburgh-pa.html

#BreakingNews Diocese of Pittsburgh, PA - FULL Text Release on 1,000 Abuse findings by Grand Jury

 For Immediate Release
BISHOP DAVID ZUBIK RESPONDS TO THE RELEASE OF THE GRAND JURY REPORT INVESTIGATING SEXUAL ABUSE BY CLERGY IN PENNSYLVANIA PITTSBURGH—
At a news conference shortly after the release of the “Report of the 40th Statewide Investigating Grand Jury,” Bishop David Zubik of the Diocese of Pittsburgh expressed his concern for victims of child sexual abuse by clergy, spoke of 30 years of diocesan efforts to end and prevent such abuse, and pledged to take any steps needed to strengthen those efforts. “Ever since I first met victims of clergy child sexual abuse in 1988, I have seen the immense pain that this crime causes to its victims, to their loved ones and to the heart of Jesus,” Bishop Zubik said. “I have cried with them and for them over the damage done to them and their families by men whose lives should have been committed to protecting their souls from harm. I dedicate myself to helping them and to doing everything possible to prevent such abuse from happening again.” Bishop Zubik also offered an apology for the instances when the Church did not respond effectively to victims. “We cannot bury our heads in the sand,” Bishop Zubik said. “Swift and firm responses to allegations should have started long before they did.” While apologies are important, he said, “it is not enough. Continued action is necessary.” He then reviewed many actions that the Diocese of Pittsburgh has taken over three decades to end child sexual abuse and respond to victims. The bishop stated that at least 90 percent of all reported child sexual abuse by clergy in the Diocese of Pittsburgh occurred prior to 1990.

“The Diocese of Pittsburgh today is not the Church that is described in the Grand Jury Report. It has not been for a long time. Over the course of the last 30 years, we have made significant changes to how we prevent abuse and report allegations,” Bishop Zubik said. He continued that “there is no priest or deacon in public ministry today in the Diocese of Pittsburgh with a substantiated allegation of child sexual abuse against him.” Bishop Zubik outlined some of the steps that the Diocese of Pittsburgh has taken over 30 years to remove offenders from ministry, offer assistance to victims and protect minors from future abuse. Among them are: • The curriculum at seminaries has been overhauled to better prepare men for a healthy celibate lifestyle. • Beginning in 1989, the Diocese of Pittsburgh has engaged an Independent Review Board to address allegations of child sexual abuse. • Since 1993, a Diocesan Assistance Coordinator has met with victims and continues to respond to their needs. • The Diocese of Pittsburgh offers psychological counseling for victims and their families with the licensed therapist of their choice. • Since 1993, the Diocese of Pittsburgh has encouraged victims to contact civil authorities and since 2002 the diocese has committed itself to do the same. • The Diocese of Pittsburgh has conducted child protection workshops and online training for more than 70,000 clergy, employees and volunteers in its churches, schools and institutions. Bishop Zubik also described actions that the Diocese of Pittsburgh is taking to ensure that its efforts to prevent and address child sexual abuse remain strong. • The Diocese of Pittsburgh has engaged an expert on the prevention and prosecution of child sexual abuse to thoroughly review our practices and make recommendations for improvement. Shay Bilchik, a Research Professor at Georgetown University, is the former president of the Child Welfare League of America. He has extensive experience as a state prosecutor in Florida specializing in children’s issues. He was also administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention at the U.S. Department of Justice, where his portfolio included child protection. He has already begun a preliminary review. • The Diocese of Pittsburgh has created a position and will hire an experienced professional to actively monitor clergy who have been removed from ministry following allegations of child sexual abuse. • The Diocese of Pittsburgh has posted on its website, www.diopitt.org, a list of 83 diocesan priests against whom there have been allegations of sexual abuse of minors, including some that the Grand Jury chose not to publish. In its report on Diocese of Pittsburgh, the Grand Jury named 90 priests and religious brothers as offenders. Of that number, 68 are priests of the Diocese of Pittsburgh and 22 are either priests of other dioceses or priests or brothers of religious orders. During the 70 years that the Grand Jury report covers, more than 1,700 diocesan priests have served in the Diocese of Pittsburgh who did not have an allegation of child sexual abuse made against them. Regarding specific allegations about the Diocese of Pittsburgh in the Grand Jury report, Bishop Zubik referred reporters and the public to the official response and statement that the diocese filed with the Office of the Attorney General. Those are attached to the Grand Jury report. They are also at www.diopitt.org along with other explanatory documents. Bishop Zubik ended his press conference with a message for victims. “Again, I express my sorrow for the pain you have suffered at the hands of someone who was supposed to care for your soul. My apology comes with our sincere effort to improve, and our continuing invitation to meet with you and assist you with resources for healing,” he said. # # #
SOURCE: Press Release of Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh PA
SEE ALSO: 

#BreakingNews US Catholic Bishops FULL Text Release on Grand Jury Report of Abuse of 1,000

http://www.catholicnewsworld.com/2018/08/breakingnews-us-catholic-bishops-full.html
For Further Info Please See the Following Links from the Diocese:
Statement of Bishop David Zubik on the Release of the Grand Jury Report 

Response of the Diocese of Pittsburgh Attached to the Grand Jury Report 

Glossary of Catholic Terms Relating to Ministry

Novena to St. Maximilian Kolbe - Patron of #Drug #Addicts - SHARE #Kolbe #Miracle #Prayer

Say once a day for 9 days
Especially on the Feast of St. Maximilian.
 O Lord Jesus Christ, Who said, "greater love than this no man has that a man lay down his life for his friends," through the intercession of Saint Maximilian Kolbe whose life illustrated such love, we beseech Thee to grant us our petitions. (Mention your intentions here) Through the Militia Immaculata movement, which Maximilian founded, he spread a fervent devotion to Our Lady throughout the world. He gave up his life for a total stranger and loved his persecutors, giving us an example of unselfish love for all men -- a love that was inspired by true devotion to Mary. Grant, O Lord Jesus, that we too may give ourselves entirely without reserve to the love and service of our Heavenly Queen in order to better love and serve our fellow man in imitation of Thy humble servant, Saint Maximilian. Amen.
 Recite 1 Our Father, 1 Hail Marys and 1 Glory Be each day.

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Tues. August 14, 2018 - #Eucharist


Memorial of Saint Maximilian Kolbe, Priest and Martyr
Lectionary: 414

Reading 1EZ 2:8—3:4

The Lord GOD said to me:
As for you, son of man, obey me when I speak to you:
be not rebellious like this house of rebellion,
but open your mouth and eat what I shall give you.

It was then I saw a hand stretched out to me,
in which was a written scroll which he unrolled before me.
It was covered with writing front and back,
and written on it was:
Lamentation and wailing and woe!

He said to me: Son of man, eat what is before you;
eat this scroll, then go, speak to the house of Israel.
So I opened my mouth and he gave me the scroll to eat.
Son of man, he then said to me,
feed your belly and fill your stomach
with this scroll I am giving you.
I ate it, and it was as sweet as honey in my mouth.
He said: Son of man, go now to the house of Israel,
and speak my words to them.

Responsorial PsalmPS 119:14, 24, 72, 103, 111, 131

R. (103a) How sweet to my taste is your promise!
In the way of your decrees I rejoice,
as much as in all riches.
R. How sweet to my taste is your promise!
Yes, your decrees are my delight;
they are my counselors.
R. How sweet to my taste is your promise!The law of your mouth is to me more precious
than thousands of gold and silver pieces.
R. How sweet to my taste is your promise!
How sweet to my palate are your promises,
sweeter than honey to my mouth!
R. How sweet to my taste is your promise!
Your decrees are my inheritance forever;
the joy of my heart they are.
R. How sweet to my taste is your promise!
I gasp with open mouth,
in my yearning for your commands.
R. How sweet to my taste is your promise!

AlleluiaMT 11:29AB

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Take my yoke upon you and learn from me,
for I am meek and humble of heart.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMT 18:1-5, 10, 12-14

The disciples approached Jesus and said,
“Who is the greatest in the Kingdom of heaven?”
He called a child over, placed it in their midst, and said,
“Amen, I say to you, unless you turn and become like children,
you will not enter the Kingdom of heaven.
Whoever becomes humble like this child
is the greatest in the Kingdom of heaven.
And whoever receives one child such as this in my name receives me.

“See that you do not despise one of these little ones,
for I say to you that their angels in heaven
always look upon the face of my heavenly Father.
What is your opinion?
If a man has a hundred sheep and one of them goes astray,
will he not leave the ninety-nine in the hills
and go in search of the stray?
And if he finds it, amen, I say to you, he rejoices more over it
than over the ninety-nine that did not stray.
In just the same way, it is not the will of your heavenly Father
that one of these little ones be lost.”