Monday, February 29, 2016

Saint March 1 : St. David : #Bishop : Patron of #Wales

(DEGUI, DEWI). Bishop and Confessor, patron of Wales. He is usually represented standing on a little hill, with a dove on his shoulder. From time immemorial the Welsh have worn a leek on St. David's day, in memory of a battle against the Saxons, at which it is said they wore leeks in their hats, by St. David's advice, to distinguish them from their enemies. He is commemorated on 1 March. The earliest mention of St. David is found in a tenth-century manuscript Of the "Annales Cambriae", which assigns his death to A.D. 601. Many other writers, from Geoffrey of Monmouth down to Father Richard Stanton, hold that he died about 544, but their opinion is based solely on data given in various late "lives" of St. David, and there seems no good reason for setting aside the definite statement of the "Annales Cambriae", which is now generally accepted. Little else that can claim to be historical is known about St. David. The tradition that he was born at Henvynyw (Vetus-Menevia) in Cardiganshire is not improbable. He was prominent at the Synod of Brevi (Llandewi Brefi in Cardiganshire), which has been identified with the important Roman military station, Loventium. Shortly afterwards, in 569, he presided over another synod held at a place called Lucus Victoriae. He was Bishop (probably not Archbishop) of Menevia, the Roman port Menapia in Pembrokeshire, later known as St. David's, then the chief point of departure for Ireland. St. David was canonized by Pope Callistus II in the year 1120.
The first biography that has come down to us was written near the end of the eleventh century, about 500 years after the saint's death, by Rhygyfarch (Ricemarchus). According to these other writers St. David was the son of Sant or Sandde ab Ceredig ab Cunnedda, The saint's mother was Nonna, or Nonnita (sometimes called Melaria), a daughter of Gynyr of Caergawch. She was a nun who had been violated by Sant. St. David's birth  took place at "Old Menevia" somewhere about A.D. 454. Afterwards he spent ten years studying the Holy Scripture at Whitland in Carmarthenshire, under St. Paulinus (Pawl Hen), whom he cured of blindness by the sign of the cross. At the end of this period St. Paulinus, warned by an angel, sent out the young saint to evangelize the British. St. David journeyed throughout the West, founding or restoring twelve monasteries (among which occur the great names of Glastonbury, Bath, and Leominster), and finally settled in the Vale of Ross, where he and his monks lived a life of extreme austerity.  Here also his monks tried to poison him, but St. David, warned by St. Scuthyn, who crossed from Ireland in one night on the back of a sea-monster, blessed the poisoned bread and ate it without harm. From thence, with St. Teilo and St. Padarn, he set out for Jerusalem, where he was made bishop by the patriarch. Here too St. Dubric and St. Daniel found him, when they came to call him to the Synod of Brevi "against the Pelagians". St. David was with difficulty persuaded to accompany them; on his way he raised a widow's son to life, and at the synod preached so loudly, from the hill that miraculously rose under him, that all could hear him, and so eloquently that all the heretics were confounded. St. Dubric resigned the "Archbishopric of Caerleon", and St. David was appointed in his stead. One of his first acts was to hold, in the year 569, yet another synod called "Victory", against the Pelagians, of which the decrees were confirmed by the pope. With the permission of King Arthur he removed his see from Caerleon to Menevia, whence he governed the British Church for many years with great holiness and wisdom. He died at the great age of 147, on the day predicted by himself a week earlier. His body is said to have been translated to Glastonbury in the year 966. (Edited from Catholic Encyclopedia)

Saint March 1 : St. Suitbert : Patron of #Angina Sufferers; #Throat diseases


St. Suitbert
APOSTLE OF THE FRISIANS
Feast: March 1


     Information:
Feast Day:March 1
Born:
647
Died:1 March 713 near Düsseldorf, Germany 
Patron of:angina sufferers; Germany; throat diseases
Apostle of the Frisians, b. in England in the seventh century; d. at Suitberts-Insel, now Kaiserswerth, near Dusseldorf, 1 March, 713. He studied in Ireland, at Rathmelsigi, Connacht, along with St. Egbert. The latter, filled with zeal for the conversion of the Germans, had sent St. Wihtberht, or Wigbert, to evangelize the Frisians, but owing to the opposition of the pagan ruler, Rathbod, Wihtberht was unsuccessful and returned to England. Egbert then sent St. Willibrord and his twelve companions, among whom was St. Suitbert. They landed near the mouth of the Rhine and journeyed to Utrecht, which became their headquarters. The new missionaries worked with great success under the protection of Pepin of Heristal, who, having recently conquered a portion of Frisia, compelled Rathbod to cease harassing the Christians. Suitbert laboured chiefly in North Brabant, Guelderland, and Cleves. After some years he went back to England, and in 693 was consecrated in Mercia as a missionary bishop by St. Wilfrid of York. He returned to Frisia and fixed his see at Wijkbij Duurstede on a branch of the Rhine. A little later, entrusting his flock of converts to St. Willibrord, he proceeded north of the Rhine and the Lippe, among the Bructeri, or Boructuari, in the district of Berg, Westphalia. This mission bore great fruit at first, but was eventually a failure owing to the inroads of the pagan Saxons; when the latter had conquered the territory, Suitbert withdrew to a small island in the Rhine, six miles from Dusseldorf, granted to him by Pepin of Heristal, where he built a monastery and ended his days in peace. His relics were rediscovered in 1626 at Kaiserwerth and are still venerated there. St. Suitbert of Kaiserwerdt is to be distinguished from a holy abbot, Suitbert, who lived in a monastery near the River Dacore, Cumberland, England, about forty years later, and is mentioned by Venerable Bede.

(Taken From Catholic Encyclopedia)

Wow #Actress Jennifer Garner returns to Church on Sundays due to new Movie and her Kids questions...SHARE

Jennifer Anne Garner was born April 17, 1972 to a Christian family that attend church on Sundays. But when this actress and produce made her way to L.A she stopped going. However, since starring in the new film “Miracles From Heaven” her life has been changed. She and her children have started going to a local Methodist church every Sunday again. People Magazine reported. “I grew up going to church every Sunday of my life, and when I did move to L.A., it wasn’t something that was just part of the culture in the same way, at least in my life,” Garner said. “But it didn’t mean that I lost who I was.”  When Garner played the role of Christy Beam, a mother whose daughter, Annabel, survived being trapped inside a hollowed-out tree, she changed her ways. Beam published a book in 2015 entitled “Miracles From Heaven,” explained how Annabel experienced miracles, including meeting Jesus and healing after her fall.  “There was something about doing this film and talking to my kids about it and realizing that they were looking for the structure of church every Sunday,” Garner explained. “So it was a great gift of this film that it took us back to finding our local Methodist church and going every Sunday. It’s really sweet.” “I was talking to my kids about the movie, and they said ‘Mom, you don’t take us to church.'” "On this movie it was.” “If you’re a person of faith, you are so on the outside that there’s no way to bridge to somebody that’s normal,” she added. “There was something about doing this film and talking to my kids about it and realizing that they were looking for the structure of church every Sunday,” said Garner. “So it was a great gift of this film that it took us back to finding our local Methodist church and going every Sunday. It’s really sweet.” “I fell so in love with this family, I fell so in love with their love for each other. I fell so in love with their faith,” Garner said about the Beam family. 


Today's Mass Readings and Video : Mon. February 29, 2016


Monday of the Third Week of Lent
Lectionary: 237


Reading 12 KGS 5:1-15AB

Naaman, the army commander of the king of Aram,
was highly esteemed and respected by his master,
for through him the LORD had brought victory to Aram.
But valiant as he was, the man was a leper.
Now the Arameans had captured in a raid on the land of Israel
a little girl, who became the servant of Naaman’s wife.
“If only my master would present himself to the prophet in Samaria,”
she said to her mistress, “he would cure him of his leprosy.”
Naaman went and told his lord
just what the slave girl from the land of Israel had said.
“Go,” said the king of Aram.
“I will send along a letter to the king of Israel.”
So Naaman set out, taking along ten silver talents,
six thousand gold pieces, and ten festal garments.
To the king of Israel he brought the letter, which read:
“With this letter I am sending my servant Naaman to you,
that you may cure him of his leprosy.”

When he read the letter,
the king of Israel tore his garments and exclaimed:
“Am I a god with power over life and death,
that this man should send someone to me to be cured of leprosy?
Take note! You can see he is only looking for a quarrel with me!”
When Elisha, the man of God,
heard that the king of Israel had torn his garments,
he sent word to the king:
“Why have you torn your garments?
Let him come to me and find out
that there is a prophet in Israel.”

Naaman came with his horses and chariots
and stopped at the door of Elisha’s house.
The prophet sent him the message:
“Go and wash seven times in the Jordan,
and your flesh will heal, and you will be clean.”
But Naaman went away angry, saying,
“I thought that he would surely come out and stand there
to invoke the LORD his God,
and would move his hand over the spot,
and thus cure the leprosy.
Are not the rivers of Damascus, the Abana and the Pharpar,
better than all the waters of Israel?
Could I not wash in them and be cleansed?”
With this, he turned about in anger and left.

But his servants came up and reasoned with him.
“My father,” they said,
“if the prophet had told you to do something extraordinary,
would you not have done it?
All the more now, since he said to you,
‘Wash and be clean,’ should you do as he said.”
So Naaman went down and plunged into the Jordan seven times
at the word of the man of God.
His flesh became again like the flesh of a little child, and he was clean.

He returned with his whole retinue to the man of God.
On his arrival he stood before him and said,
“Now I know that there is no God in all the earth,
except in Israel.”

Responsorial PsalmPS 42:2, 3; 43:3, 4

R. (see 42:3) Athirst is my soul for the living God.
When shall I go and behold the face of God?

As the hind longs for the running waters,
so my soul longs for you, O God.
R. Athirst is my soul for the living God.
When shall I go and behold the face of God?

Athirst is my soul for God, the living God.
When shall I go and behold the face of God?
R. Athirst is my soul for the living God.
When shall I go and behold the face of God?

Send forth your light and your fidelity;
they shall lead me on
And bring me to your holy mountain,
to your dwelling-place.
R. Athirst is my soul for the living God.
When shall I go and behold the face of God?

Then will I go in to the altar of God,
the God of my gladness and joy;
Then will I give you thanks upon the harp,
O God, my God!
R. Athirst is my soul for the living God.
When shall I go and behold the face of God?

Verse Before The GospelSEE PS 130:5, 7

I hope in the LORD, I trust in his word;
with him there is kindness and plenteous redemption.

GospelLK 4:24-30

Jesus said to the people in the synagogue at Nazareth:
“Amen, I say to you,
no prophet is accepted in his own native place.
Indeed, I tell you, there were many widows in Israel
in the days of Elijah
when the sky was closed for three and a half years
and a severe famine spread over the entire land.
It was to none of these that Elijah was sent,
but only to a widow in Zarephath in the land of Sidon.
Again, there were many lepers in Israel
during the time of Elisha the prophet;
yet not one of them was cleansed, but only Naaman the Syrian.”
When the people in the synagogue heard this,
they were all filled with fury.
They rose up, drove him out of the town,
and led him to the brow of the hill
on which their town had been built,
to hurl him down headlong.
But he passed through the midst of them and went away.

#PopeFrancis "...blood of the many martyrs of all the Churches has become the seed of Christian unity." FULL TEXT to Orthodox Patriarch

Pope Francis greets the Patriarch of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church, Pope Matthias I - OSS_ROM
Pope Francis greets the Patriarch of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church, Pope Matthias I - OSS_ROM
29/02/2016 10:45




Pope Francis welcomed the Patriarch of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church, Pope Matthias I, to the Vatican.
The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church is the largest of the Oriental Orthodox Churches, however this Church rejected the definitions of the Council of Chalcedon in AD 451.
The full address by Pope Francis is below
 Address of His Holiness Pope Francis, To His Holiness Pope Matthias I
Patriarch of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church
Monday, 29 February 2016
 Your Holiness,
Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,
            It is a joy and a moment of grace to be able to welcome all of you here present.  I greet with affection His Holiness and the distinguished members of the Delegation.  I thank you for your words of friendship and spiritual closenesss.  Through you, I send cordial greetings to the bishops, clergy and the entire family of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church throughout the world.  The grace and peace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all.
            Your Holiness’s visit strengthens the fraternal bonds already uniting our Churches.  We recall with gratitude the visit of Patriarch Abuna Paulos to Saint John Paul II in 1993.  On 26 June 2009, Abuna Paulos returned to meet Benedict XVI, who invited him to return in October of that same year as a special guest, to address  the second Assembly for Africa of the Synod of Bishops on the situation in Africa and the challenges facing its peoples.  In the early Church, it was common practice that one Church would send representatives to the synods of other Churches.  This sense of ecclesial sharing was evident also in 2012, on the occasion of the funeral of His Holiness Abuna Paulos, at which a delegation of the Holy See was present.
            From 2004 on, the Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches have worked together to deepen their communion through the theological dialogue advanced by the Joint International Commission.  We are happy to note the increasing participation of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church in this dialogue.  Over the years, the Commission has examined the fundamental concept of the Church as communion, understood as participation in the communion between the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.  In this way, we have come to see that we have almost everything in common: one faith, one Baptism, one Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ.  We are united by virtue of our Baptism, which has made us members of the one Body of Christ.  We are also united by the various common elements of our rich monastic traditions and liturgical practices.  We are brothers and sisters in Christ.  As has often been observed, what unites us is greater than what divides us.
            We truly feel that the words of the Apostle Paul apply to us: “If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honoured, all rejoice together” (1 Cor 12:26).  Shared sufferings have enabled Christians, otherwise divided in so many ways, to grow closer to one another.  Just as in the early Church the shedding of the blood of martyrs became the seed of new Christians, so today the blood of the many martyrs of all the Churches has become the seed of Christian unity.  The martyrs and saints of all the ecclesial traditions are already one in Christ.  Their names are inscribed in the onemartyrologium of the Church of God.  The ecumenism of the martyrs is a summons to us, here and now, to advance on the path to ever greater unity.
            From the beginning, yours has been a Church of martyrs.  Today too, you are witnessing a devastating outbreak of violence against Christians and other minorities in the Middle East and in some parts of Africa.  We cannot fail, yet again, to implore those who govern the world’s political and economic life to promote a peaceful coexistence based on reciprocal respect and reconciliation, mutual forgiveness and solidarity.
            Your country is making great strides to improve the living conditions of its people and to build an ever more just society, based on the rule of law and respect for the role of women.  I think in particular of the problem of access to water, with its grave social and economic repercussions.  There is great room for cooperation between the Churches in the service of the common good and the protection of creation.  I am certain of the readiness of the Catholic Church in Ethiopia to work together with the Orthodox Tewahedo Church over which Your Holiness presides.
            Your Holiness, dear brothers and sisters, it is my fervent hope that this meeting will mark a new chapter of fraternal friendship between our Churches.  We are conscious that history has left us with a burden of painful misunderstandings and mistrust, and for this we seek God’s pardon and healing.  Let us pray for one another, invoking the protection of the martyrs and saints upon all the faithful entrusted to our pastoral care.  May the Holy Spirit continue to enlighten us and guide our steps towards harmony and peace.  May he nourish in us the hope that one day, with God’s help, we will be united around the altar of Christ’s sacrifice in the fullness of Eucharistic communion.  I pray to Mary, Mother of Mercy, for each of you, with words drawn from your own beautiful and rich liturgical tradition: “O Virgin, wellspring of the fountain of wisdom, bathe me in the streams of the Gospel of Christ your Son.  Defend me by his Cross.  Cover me with his mercy, gird me with his clemency, renew me with his unction and surround me with his fruits.  Amen”.
            Your Holiness, may Almighty God abundantly bless your ministry in the service of the beloved people of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church.
FULL TEXT from Radio Vatican

#PopeFrancis “When Jesus proposed the way of salvation...” #Lent #Homily - explains Salvation not from Political Parties

Pope Francis celebrates Mass at the Casa Santa Marta (file photo). - OSS_ROM
Pope Francis celebrates Mass at the Casa Santa Marta (file photo). - OSS_ROM
29/02/2016 12:


(Vatican Radio) God’s salvation does not come from great things, from power or wealth, nor from clerical or political parties, but from the small and simple things of God. That was Pope Francis’ message on Monday during the daily Mass at the Casa Santa Marta.
Salvation comes from the simplicity of the things of God, not from the powerful
The day’s readings spoke about contempt. In the first Reading, Naaman the Syrian, a leper, asked the prophet Elisha to heal him, but could not appreciate the simple means by which this healing would be accomplished. The Gospel spoke of the disdain the inhabitants of Nazareth felt at the words of Jesus, their fellow countryman. It was not “how we thought salvation should be, that salvation we all want.”
Jesus felt the “contempt of the doctors of the Law who sought salvation in moral casuistry,” and in a multitude of precepts. The people, though, did not have faith in them, “or in the Sadducees who sought salvation in compromises with the powers of the world, with the [Roman] Empire. Thus they sought after salvation: the one group, from clerical parties; the other from political parties. But the people did not have confidence in them, they didn’t believe them. Yes, they believed Jesus, He spoke ‘with authority.’ But why this contempt? Because in our imagination, salvation should come from something great, something majestic; only the powerful, those who have strength or money or power, can save us. These people can save us. And the plan of God is different! They felt contempt because they could not understand that salvation only comes from the small things, the simplicity of the things of God.”
The two pillars of the Gospel that people look down on
“When Jesus proposed the way of salvation,” the Pope continued, “He never spoke of great things,” but about “little things.” These are “the two pillars of the Gospel,” that we read about in Matthew: the Beatitudes, and in chapter 25, the final Judgment, where Jesus says, “Come, come with me because you have done these things, simple things.”
“You did not seek salvation or your hope in power, in political parties, in negotiations. No! You have simply done these things. And so many people look down on this! As a preparation for Easter, I invite you – I’ll do it too – to read the Beatitudes and to read Matthew 25, and to think and to see if there is something I look down on, if something disturbs my peace. Because contempt is a luxury that only the vain and the proud allow themselves. We should see if, at the end of the Beatitudes, Jesus says something” that makes us ask why He said that. “‘Blessed is he who is not scandalized in me,’ who does not look down on these things, who does not feel contempt.”
The folly of the Cross
Pope Francis concluded his homily:
“It would do us good to take some time – today, tomorrow – to read the Beatitudes, to read Matthew 25, and to pay attention to what happens in our heart: if there is some feeling of contempt. And seek grace from the Lord to understand the only path of salvation is ‘the folly of the Cross,’ that is, the Son of God ‘emptying Himself,’ making Himself small, represented here [in the Readings] in the cleansing in the Jordan, or in the small village of Nazareth.”