Sunday, June 17, 2018

Saint June 18 : St. Elizabeth of Schoenau : Patron Against #Temptations : Abbess and Mystic


































St. Elizabeth of Schoenau
BENEDICTINE ABBESS AND MYSTIC

Feast Day:
June 18
Born:
1129 at Germany
Died:
18 June 1165 at Bonn, Germany
Patron of:
against temptations

Born about 1129; d. 18 June, 1165.-Feast 18 June. She was born of an obscure family, entered the double monastery of Schönau in Nassau at the age of twelve, received the Benedictine habit, made her profession in 1147, and in 1157 was superioress of the nuns under the Abbot Hildelin. After her death she was buried in the abbey church of St. Florin. When her writings were published the name of saint was added. She was never formally canonized, but in 1584 her name was entered in the Roman Martyrology and has remained there.

Given to works of piety from her youth, much afflicted with bodily and mental suffering, a zealous observer of the Rule of St. Benedict and of the regulation of her convent, and devoted to practices of mortification, Elizabeth was favoured, from 1152, with ecstasies and visions of various kinds. These generally occurred on Sundays and Holy Days at Mass or Divine Office or after hearing or reading the lives of saints. Christ, His Blessed Mother, an angel, or the special saint of the day would appear to her and instruct her; or she would see quite realistic representations of the Passion, Resurrection, and Ascension, or other scenes of the Old and New Testaments. What she saw and heard she put down on wax tablets. Her abbot, Hildelin, told her to relate these things to her brother Egbert (Eckebert), then priest at the church of Bonn. At first she hesitated fearing lest she be deceived or be looked upon as a deceiver; but she obeyed. Egbert (who became a monk of Schönau in 1155 and succeeded Hildelin as second abbot) put everything in writing, later arranged the material at leisure, and then published all under his sister's name.

Thus came into existence

* three books of "Visions". Of these the first is written in language very simple and in unaffected style, so that it may easily pass as the work of Elizabeth. The other two are more elaborate and replete with theological terminology, so that they show more of the work of Egbert than of Elizabeth.

* "Liber viarum Dei". This seems to be an imitation of the "Scivias" (scire vias Domini) of St. Hildegarde of Bingen, her friend and correspondent. It contains admonitions to all classes of society, to the clergy and laity, to the married and unmarried. Here the influence of Egbert is very plain. She utters prophetic threats of judgment against priests who are unfaithful shepherds of the flock of Christ, against the avarice and worldliness of the monks who only wear the garb of poverty and self-denial, against the vices of the laity, and against bishops and superiors delinquent in their duty; she urges all to combat earnestly the heresy of the Cathari; she declares Victor IV, the antipope supported by Frederick against Alexander III, as the one chosen of God. All of this appears in Egbert's own writings.

* The revelation on the martyrdom of St. Ursula and her companions. This is full of fantastic exaggerations and anachronisms, but has become the foundation of the subsequent Ursula legends.

There is a great diversity of opinion in regard to her revelations. The Church has never passed sentence upon them nor even examined them. Elizabeth herself was convinced of their supernatural character, as she states in a letter to Hildegarde; her brother held the same opinion; Trithemius considers them genuine; Eusebius Amort (De revelationibus visionibus et apparitionibus privatis regulae tutae, etc., Augsburg, 1744) holds them to be nothing more than what Elizabeth's own imagination could produce, or illusions of the devil, since in some things they disagree with history and with other revelations (Acta SS., Oct, IX, 81). A complete edition of her writings was made by F.W.E. Roth (Brunn, 1884); translations appeared in Italian (Venice, 1859), French (Tournai, 1864), and in Icelandic (1226-1254).

(Taken from Catholic Encyclopedia)

Free Catholic Movie : "Joseph of Nazareth" - #StJoseph stars Tobias Moretti

Joseph of Nazareth (2000) "Gli amici di Gesù - Giuseppe di Nazareth" (original title) TV Movie - 90 min - Drama - 29 April 2001 (USA) The people of Jerusalem are suffering under the reign of HEROD, and are hoping to be delivered from the Roman occupiers by the Messiah whose arrival, it is rumored, is to take place very soon. The 35-year-old widower is not interested in participating in any fighting against the Romans. Joseph gets a visit from JOACHIM and ANNA, asking him to marry their unprotected 14-year-old daughter MARY. Joseph agrees, but promises to preserve her chastity. Nevertheless, one day Mary tells him, in Anna's presence, that she is pregnant. Believing in this immaculate conception is very difficult for Joseph, as is the message that her son JESUS will end the reign of Herod, which is announced to him in a vision. Their son is born in a Bethlehem cattle shed and heralded as the new Messiah by the Three Magi. King Herod also finds out about the rumor, and decides to kill all of Bethlehem's firstborn. Joseph and Mary escape to Egypt.
Directors: Raffaele Mertes, Elisabetta Marchetti Writers: Gareth Jones, Gianmario Pagano (story) Stars: Tobias Moretti, Stefania Rivi, Massimo Reale |

Pope Francis "...in moments of darkness and difficulty, we must not break down, but remain anchored to fidelity to God...Remember this: God always Saves." FULL TEXT-Video

POPE FRANCIS
ANGELUS
Piazza San Pietro
Sunday, 17 June, 2018
Dear brothers and sisters, Good morning!

In today's Gospel passage (cf. Mk 4: 26-34), Jesus speaks to the crowds of the Kingdom of God and the dynamisms of his growth, and he does so by telling two short parables.

In the first parable (see verses 26-29), the Kingdom of God is compared to the mysterious growth of the seed, which is thrown on the ground and then sprouts, grows and produces the ear, regardless of the care of the farmer, who at the end of maturation provides for the harvest. The message that this parable gives us is this: through the preaching and the action of Jesus, the Kingdom of God is announced, has burst into the field of the world and, like the seed, grows and develops from itself, necessarily own and according to humanly non-decipherable criteria. In its growth and sprouting within history, it does not depend so much on the work of man, but it is above all an expression of the power and goodness of God, of the power of the Holy Spirit who carries on Christian life in the People of God.

Sometimes history, with its events and its protagonists, seems to go in the opposite direction to the plan of the heavenly Father, who wants justice, fraternity and peace for all his children. But we are called to live these periods as seasons of trial, hope and watchful waiting for the harvest. In fact, yesterday as today, the Kingdom of God grows in the world in a mysterious way, in a surprising way, revealing the hidden power of the small seed, its victorious vitality. Within the folds of personal and social events that sometimes seem to mark the shipwreck of hope, we must remain confident in the subdued but powerful action of God. This is why, in moments of darkness and difficulty, we must not break down, but remain anchored to fidelity to God, in his presence that always saves. Remember this: God always saves. He is the savior.

In the second parable (see verses 30-32), Jesus compares the Kingdom of God to a mustard seed. It is a very small seed, yet it develops so much that it becomes the largest of all the plants in the garden: an unpredictable, surprising growth. It is not easy for us to enter into this logic of God's unpredictability and accept it in our lives. But today the Lord exhorts us to an attitude of faith that overcomes our plans, our calculations, our forecasts. God is always the God of surprises. The Lord always surprises us. It is an invitation to open ourselves more generously to God's plans, both on a personal and a community level. In our communities we need to pay attention to the small and great opportunities for goodness that the Lord offers us, letting ourselves be involved in his dynamics of love, of welcome and of mercy towards all.

The authenticity of the Church's mission is not given by the success or gratification of the results, but by going forward with the courage of trust and the humility of abandonment in God. Go ahead in the confession of Jesus and with the power of the Spirit Holy. It is the awareness of being small and weak instruments, which in the hands of God and with his grace can do great works, advancing his Kingdom which is "justice, peace and joy in the Holy Spirit" (Rom 14.17). May the Virgin Mary help us to be simple, to be attentive, to collaborate with our faith and our work in the development of the Kingdom of God in hearts and in history.





After the Angelus

Dear brothers and sisters,

Yesterday, in Caracas, Beata María Carmen Rendíles Martínez, founder of the Siervas de Jesús de Venezuela sisters, was proclaimed. Mother Carmen, born and died in Caracas in the last century, together with her sisters she served with love in the parishes, in the schools and next to the neediest. We praise the Lord for his faithful disciple and entrust our prayers for the Venezuelan people to his intercession. And we salute the new Blessed and the Venezuelan people with applause!

With concern I follow the dramatic fate of the people of Yemen, already exhausted by years of conflict. I appeal to the international community to spare no effort to bring the parties involved to the negotiating table urgently and to avoid a worsening of the already tragic humanitarian situation. Let us pray to Our Lady for Yemen: "Hail Mary ...".

Next Wednesday will be the World Refugee Day, promoted by the United Nations to draw attention to what they live, often with great anxiety and suffering, our brothers forced to flee their land due to conflict and persecution. A day that, this year, falls in the wake of the consultations between the governments for the adoption of a World Pact on Refugees, which is to be adopted within the year, such as that for a safe, orderly and regular migration. I hope that the States involved in these processes will reach an agreement to ensure, with responsibility and humanity, assistance and protection for those forced to leave your country. But each of us is also called to be close to the refugees, to find moments of encounter with them, to value their contribution, so that they too can better integrate themselves into the communities that receive them. In this meeting and in this mutual respect and support there is the solution of many problems. I greet all of you, dear Romans and pilgrims, especially those from Spain, Malta, Brazil - these Brazilians are noisy! -, from the United States of America; the students of the "London Oratory School" and those of the "Colegio Oratorio Festivo" of Novelda (Spain). I heard that among you there is a group of Argentineans. Remember that today in our country is Father's Day. Remember your fathers in your prayers. I greet the faithful of Teramo, Francavilla a Mare and the group of Catholic Action of Trento; the boys from Campobasso who received the Confirmation; the Association of Italian Ecclesiastical Librarians and the group "A meeting, a hope" of Olbia. I wish everyone a good Sunday. Please do not forget to pray for me. Good lunch and goodbye.
Source: Vatican.va

Sunday Mass Online : Sun. June 17, 2018 - #Eucharist - Readings + Video

Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 92

Reading 1EZ 17:22-24

Thus says the Lord GOD:
I, too, will take from the crest of the cedar,
from its topmost branches tear off a tender shoot,
and plant it on a high and lofty mountain;
on the mountain heights of Israel I will plant it.
It shall put forth branches and bear fruit,
and become a majestic cedar.
Birds of every kind shall dwell beneath it,
every winged thing in the shade of its boughs.
And all the trees of the field shall know
that I, the LORD,
bring low the high tree,
lift high the lowly tree,
wither up the green tree,
and make the withered tree bloom.
As I, the LORD, have spoken, so will I do.

Responsorial PsalmPS 92:2-3, 13-14, 15-16

R. (cf. 2a) Lord, it is good to give thanks to you.
It is good to give thanks to the LORD,
to sing praise to your name, Most High,
To proclaim your kindness at dawn
and your faithfulness throughout the night.
R. Lord, it is good to give thanks to you.
The just one shall flourish like the palm tree,
like a cedar of Lebanon shall he grow.
They that are planted in the house of the LORD
shall flourish in the courts of our God.
R. Lord, it is good to give thanks to you.
They shall bear fruit even in old age;
vigorous and sturdy shall they be,
Declaring how just is the LORD,
my rock, in whom there is no wrong.
R. Lord, it is good to give thanks to you.

Reading 2 2 COR 5:6-10

Brothers and sisters:
We are always courageous,
although we know that while we are at home in the body
we are away from the Lord,
for we walk by faith, not by sight.
Yet we are courageous,
and we would rather leave the body and go home to the Lord.
Therefore, we aspire to please him,
whether we are at home or away.
For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ,
so that each may receive recompense,
according to what he did in the body, whether good or evil.

Alleluia

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
The seed is the word of God, Christ is the sower.
All who come to him will live forever.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMK 4:26-34

Jesus said to the crowds:
“This is how it is with the kingdom of God;
it is as if a man were to scatter seed on the land
and would sleep and rise night and day
and through it all the seed would sprout and grow,
he knows not how.
Of its own accord the land yields fruit,
first the blade, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear.
And when the grain is ripe, he wields the sickle at once,
for the harvest has come.”

He said,
“To what shall we compare the kingdom of God,
or what parable can we use for it?
It is like a mustard seed that, when it is sown in the ground,
is the smallest of all the seeds on the earth.
But once it is sown, it springs up and becomes the largest of plants
and puts forth large branches,
so that the birds of the sky can dwell in its shade.”
With many such parables
he spoke the word to them as they were able to understand it.
Without parables he did not speak to them,
but to his own disciples he explained everything in private.

Saint June 17 : St. Avitus : #Abbot : Died 530

St. Avitus
ABBOT
Feast: June 17


     Information:
Feast Day:June 17
Died:530
ST. AVITUS was a native of Orleans, and, retiring into Auvergne, took the monastic habit, together with St. Calais, in the abbey of Menat, at that time very small, though afterward enriched by Queen Brunehault, and by St. Boner, Bishop of Clermont. The two Saints soon after returned to Miscy, a famous abbey situated a league and a half below Orleans. It was founded toward the end of the reign of Clovis I. by St. Euspicius, a holy priest, honored on the 14th of June, and his nephew St. Maximin or Mesnim, whose name this monastery, which is now of the Cistercian Order, bears. Many call St. Maximin the first abbot, others St. Euspicius the first, St. Maximin the second, and St. Avitus the third. But our Saint and St. Calais made not a long stay at Miscy, though St. Maximin gave them a gracious reception. In quest of a closer retirement, St. Avitus, who had succeeded St. Maximin, soon after resigned the abbacy, and with St. Calais lived a recluse in the territory now called Dunois, on the frontiers of La Perche. Others joining them, St. Calais retired into a forest in Maine, and King Clotaire built a church and monastery for St. Avitus and his companions. This is at present a Benedictine nunnery, called St. Avy of Chateaudun, and is situated on the Loire, at the foot of the hill on which the town of Chateaudun is built, in the diocese of Chartres. Three famous monks, Leobin, afterwards Bishop of Chartres, Euphronius, and Rusticus, attended our Saint to his happy death, which happened about the year 530. His body was carried to Orleans, and buried with great pomp in that city.

(Taken from Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler)