Saturday, September 9, 2017

#PopeFrancis "Discipleship must begin with a living experience of God and his love." Official FULL TEXT Homily +Mass Video

Pope Francis’  travelled to Columbian city – Medellin – on Saturday to celebrate Mass with 1 Million people attending.
Please find below the full text of the official English translation of the Pope's prepared Homily:
“The Christian Life as Discipleship”
Medellín – John Paul II Airport
Saturday, 9 September 2017
Dear Brothers and Sisters,
During the Mass on Thursday in Bogotá, we heard Jesus calling his first disciples; the part of Luke’s Gospel which opens with this passage, concludes with the call of the Twelve.  What are the evangelists reminding us of between these two events?  That this journey of following Jesus involved a great work of purification in his first followers.  Some of the precepts, prohibitions and mandates made them feel secure; fulfilling certain practices and rites dispensed them from the uncomfortable question: “What would God like us to do?”  The Lord Jesus tells them that their fulfilment involves following him, and that this journey will make them encounter lepers, paralytics and sinners.  These realities demand much more than a formula, an established norm.  The disciples learned that following Jesus presupposes other priorities, other considerations in order to serve God.  For the Lord, as also for the first community, it is of the greatest importance that we who call ourselves disciples not cling to a certain style or to particular practices that cause us to be more like some Pharisees than like Jesus.  Jesus’ freedom contrasts with the lack of freedom seen in the doctors of the law of that time, who were paralyzed by a rigorous interpretation and practice of that law.  Jesus does not live according to a superficially “correct” observance; he brings the law to its fullness.  This is what he wants for us, to follow him in such a way as to go to what is essentialto be renewed, and to get involved.  These are three attitudes that must form our lives as disciples. 

Firstly, going to what is essential.  This does not mean “breaking with everything” that does not suit us, because Jesus did not come “to abolish the law, but to fulfil it” (Mt 5:17); it means to go deep, to what matters and has value for life.  Jesus teaches that being in relationship with God cannot be a cold attachment to norms and laws, nor the observance of some outward actions that do not lead to a real change of life.  Neither can our discipleship simply be motivated by custom because we have a baptismal certificate.  Discipleship must begin with a living experience of God and his love.  It is not something static, but a continuous movement towards Christ; it is not simply the fidelity to making a doctrine explicit, but rather the experience of the Lord’s living, kindly and active presence, an ongoing formation by listening to his word.  And this word, we have heard, makes itself known to us in the concrete needs of our brothers and sisters: the hunger of those nearest to us in the text just proclaimed, or illness as Luke narrates afterwards.
Secondly, being renewed.  As Jesus “shook” the doctors of the law to break them free of their rigidity, now also the Church is “shaken” by the Spirit in order to lay aside comforts and attachments.  We should not be afraid of renewal.  The Church always needs renewal – Ecclesia semper reformanda.  She does not renew herself on her own whim, but rather does so “firm in the faith, stable and steadfast, not shifting from the hope of the gospel” (Col1:23).  Renewal entails sacrifice and courage, not so that we can consider ourselves superior or flawless, but rather to respond better to the Lord’s call.  The Lord of the Sabbath, the reason for our commandments and prescriptions, invites us to reflect on regulations when our following him is at stake; when his open wounds and his cries of hunger and thirst for justice call out to us and demand new responses.  In Colombia there are many situations where disciples must embrace Jesus’ way of life, particularly love transformed into acts of non-violence, reconciliation and peace.  
Thirdly, getting involved.  Even if it may seem that you are getting yourself dirty or stained, get involved.  Like David and those with him who entered the Temple because they were hungry and the disciples of Jesus who ate ears of grain in the field, so also today we are called upon to be brave, to have that evangelical courage which springs from knowing that there are many who are hungry, who hunger for God, who hunger for dignity, because they have been deprived.  As Christians, help them to be satiated by God; do not impede them or stop this encounter.  We cannot be Christians who continually put up “do not enter” signs, nor can we consider that this space is mine or yours alone, or that we can claim ownership of something that is absolutely not ours.  The Church is not ours, she is God’s; he is the owner of the temple and the field; everyone has a place, everyone is invited to find here, and among us, his or her nourishment.  We are simple servants (cf. Col 1:23) and we cannot prevent this encounter.  On the contrary, Jesus tells us, as he told his disciples: “You give them something to eat” (Mt 14:16); this is our service.  Saint Peter Claver understood this well, he whom we celebrate today in the liturgy and whom I will venerate tomorrow in Cartagena.  “Slave of the slaves forever” was the motto of his life, because he understood, as a disciple of Jesus, that he could not remain indifferent to the suffering of the most helpless and mistreated of his time, and that he had to do something to alleviate their suffering. 
Brothers and sisters, the Church in Colombia is called to commit itself, with greater boldness, to forming missionary disciples, as the Bishops stated when they were gathered in Aparecida in 2007.  Disciples who know how to see, judge and act, as stated in that Latin-American document born in this land (cf. Medellín, 1968).  Missionary disciples that know how to see, without hereditary short-sightedness; looking at reality with the eyes and heart of Jesus, and only then judging.  Disciples who risk, act, and commit themselves.
I have come here precisely to confirm you in the faith and hope of the Gospel.  Remain steadfast and free in Christ, in such a way that you manifest him in everything you do; take up the path of Jesus with all your strength, know him, allow yourselves to be called and taught by him, and proclaim him with great joy. 
Let us pray through the intercession of Our Mother, Our Lady of Candelaria, that she may accompany us on our path of discipleship, so that, giving our lives to Christ, we may simply be missionaries who bring the light and joy of the Gospel to all people.

#PopeFrancis "God will not abandon you, but protect you and help you." Official FULL TEXT to Children in Columbia + Video


Pope Francis’ apostolic visited Medellin on Friday at the community at Hogar San José: a Jesuit-run home for orphaned children victims of Colombia’s conflict. The over 300 children cared for by the nuns, lay people and volunteers of the Home for those child victims of violence and abuse. Please find below the official English translation of the Pope's prepared Greeting:
“Saint Joseph’s Children's Home”
Medellín
Saturday, 9 September 2017
Dear Brothers and Sisters,
Dear Boys and Girls,
          I am very happy to be with you here at “Saint Joseph’s Home”.  Thank you for the welcome you prepared for me.  I am grateful also to the director, Monsignor Armando Santamaría, for his words.
          I wish to express my thanks to you, Claudia Yesenia, for your courageous testimony.  Hearing all of the difficulties you experienced, I thought of the unjust suffering of so many boys and girls throughout the world, who have been and continue to be innocent victims of the evil that others commit.
          The Baby Jesus was also a victim of hatred and persecution; he too had to run away with his family, to leave his country and his home, in order to escape death.  To see children suffer, wounds our hearts because children are Jesus’ favourites.  We can never accept that they are mistreated, that they are denied the right to live out their childhood peacefully and joyfully, that they are denied a future of hope. 
          Jesus, however, never abandons those who suffer, much less you, boys and girls, who are his special ones.  Claudia Yesenia, in the midst of all the horrible things that happened, God gave you an aunt to watch out for you, a hospital to care for you, and finally a community to welcome you.  This “home” is a sign of Jesus’ love for you, and of his desire to be very close to you.  He does this through the loving care of all those good people who are with you, who love you and teach you.  I think of those who direct this house, the sisters, the staff and so many others who are already a part of your family.  For this is what you do here, you make this place a home: the warmth of a family where we feel loved, protected, accepted, cared for and accompanied. 
          I am happy that this place bears the name of Saint Joseph, and the other homes the names of “Jesus the Worker” and “Bethlehem”.   It means that you are in good hands.  Do you remember what Saint Matthew writes in his Gospel, when he tells us that Herod, in his foolishness, decided to kill the Infant Jesus?  How, in a dream, God spoke to Saint Joseph by means of an angel, and entrusted to his care and protection his most valuable treasures: Jesus and Mary?  Matthew tells us that, as soon as the angel spoke, Joseph immediately obeyed, and did all that God told him to do: “He rose and took the child and his mother by night, and departed to Egypt” (Mt 2:14).  I am sure that, just as Saint Joseph protected and defended the Holy Family from danger, so too he is defending you, caring for you and accompanying you.  Alongside him are Jesus and Mary, because Saint Joseph can never be without Jesus and Mary.
          To you, brothers and sisters, religious and lay people, and to those in the other homes who welcome and lovingly care for these children that from infancy have experienced suffering and sorrow: I would like to remind you of two realities that you must never forget because they are part of the Christian identity – the love that knows how to see Jesus present in the smallest and weakest, and the sacred duty of bringing children to Jesus.  In this task, with your joys and hardships, I commend you also to Saint Joseph’s protection.  Learn from him, that his example may inspire you and help you in your loving care for these little ones, who are the future of Colombian society, of the world and of the Church, so that like Jesus, they may grow and be strengthened in wisdom and grace, before God and others (cf. Lk 2:52).  May Jesus and Mary, together with Saint Joseph, accompany and protect you, and fill you with their tenderness, joy and strength.
          I promise to pray for you, so that in this place of family love, you may grow in love, peace and happiness, and your wounds of body and heart may heal.  God will not abandon you, but protect you and help you.  And the Pope will keep you in his heart.  Please do not forget to pray for me. 

#PopeFrancis "I would like us to pray together and to forgive one another – I also need to ask forgiveness" to #Victims FULL TEXT + Video at Prayer


Pope Francis took part in a prayer for National Reconciliation in the Las Malocas Park in Villavicencio on Friday during his Apostolic Visit to Colombia, 
The Pope was brought to tears when he listened to the testimonies of four people.
Please find below the official English translation of the Pope's prepared speech:
Villavicencio
Friday, 8 September 2017
Dear Brothers and Sisters,
          I have been looking forward to this moment since my arrival in your country.  You carry in your hearts and your flesh the signs of the recent, living memory of your people which is marked by tragic events, but also filled with heroic acts, great humanity, and the noble spiritual values of faith and hope.  I come here with respect and with a clear awareness that, like Moses, I am standing on sacred ground (cf. Ex 3:5).   A land watered by the blood of thousands of innocent victims and by the heart-breaking sorrow of their families and friends.  Wounds that are hard to heal and that hurt us all, because every act of violence committed against a human being is a wound in humanity’s flesh; every violent death diminishes us as people.

          I am here not so much to speak, but to be close to you and to see you with my own eyes, to listen to you and to open my heart to your witness of life and faith.  And if you will allow me, I wish also to embrace you and weep with you.  I would like us to pray together and to forgive one another – I also need to ask forgiveness – so that, together, we can all look and walk forward in faith and hope.
          We have gathered at the feet of the Crucifix of Bojayá, which witnessed and endured the massacre of more than a hundred people, who had come to the Church for refuge on 2 May 2002.  This image has a powerful symbolic and spiritual value.  As we look at it, we remember not only what happened on that day, but also the immense suffering, the many deaths and broken lives, and all the blood spilt in Colombia these past decades.  To see Christ this way, mutilated and wounded, questions us.  He no longer has arms, nor is his body there, but his face remains, with which he looks upon us and loves us.  Christ broken and without limbs is for us “even more Christ”, because he shows us once more that he came to suffer for his people and with his people. He came to show us that hatred does not have the last word, that love is stronger than death and violence.  He teaches us to transform pain into a source of life and resurrection, so that, with him, we may learn the power of forgiveness, the grandeur of love. 
I thank our brothers and sisters who have shared their testimonies with us, on behalf of so many others.  How good it is for us to hear their stories!  I am moved listening to them.  They are stories of suffering and anguish, but also, and above all, they are stories of love and forgiveness that speak to us of life and hope; stories of not letting hatred, vengeance or pain take control of our hearts.
The final prophecy of Psalm 85 – “Mercy and faithfulness will meet; righteousness and peace will kiss each other” (v. 10) – follows the working of grace and the petition to God: “Restore us!”  Thank you, Lord, for the witness of those who inflicted suffering and who ask for forgiveness; for the witness of those who suffered unjustly and who forgive.  This is only possible with your help and presence… this is already a great sign of your desire to restore peace and harmony in this land of Colombia.
          Pastora Mira, you put it well: you want to place all your suffering, and that of the thousands of victims, at the feet of Jesus Crucified, so that united to his suffering, it may be transformed into blessing and forgiveness so as to break the cycle of violence that has reigned over Colombia.  You are right: violence leads to more violence, hatred to more hatred, death to more death.  We must break this cycle which seems inescapable; this is only possible through forgiveness and reconciliation.  And you, dear Pastora, and so many others like you, have shown us that this is possible.  Yes, with the help of Christ alive in the midst of the community, it is possible to conquer hatred, it is possible to conquer death and it is possible to begin again and usher in a new Colombia.  Thank you, Pastora; you have helped us greatly today by the witness of your life.  It is the Crucified One of Bojayá who has given you this strength to forgive and to love, to help you to see in the shirt that your daughter Sandra Paola gave to your son Jorge Aníbal not only a remembrance of their deaths, but the hope that peace will finally triumph in Colombia. 
          We are also moved by what Luz Dary said in her testimony: that the wounds of the heart are deeper and more difficult to heal than those of the body.  This is true.  Even more important, you realized that it is not possible to live with resentment, but only with a love that liberates and builds.   And so you also began to heal the wounds of other victims, to rebuild their dignity.  This going out of yourself has enriched you, has helped you look ahead, find peace and serenity and a reason to keep moving forward.  I thank you for the crutch you have given me.  Although you still have physical side-effects from your injuries, your spiritual gait is fast and steady, because you think of others and want to help them.  Your crutch is a symbol of the more important crutch we all need, which is love and forgiveness.  By your love and forgiveness you are helping so many people to walk in life.  Thank you.
          I wish to acknowledge also the powerful testimony of Deisy and Juan Carlos.  You have helped us to understand that, in the end, in one way or another, we too are victims, innocent or guilty, but all victims.  We are all united in this loss of humanity that means violence and death.  Deisy has said it clearly: you realized that you yourself were a victim and you needed to be given a chance.  So you started to study, and now you work to help victims and prevent young people from falling into the snares of violence and drugs.  There is also hope for those who did wrong; all is not lost.  Of course justice requires that perpetrators of wrongdoing undergo moral and spiritual renewal.  As Deisy said, we must make a positive contribution to healing our society that has been wounded by violence.
          It can be difficult to believe that change is possible for those who appealed to a ruthless violence in order to promote their own agenda, protect their illegal affairs so they could gain wealth, or claim – dishonestly – that they were defending the lives of their brothers and sisters.  Undoubtedly, it is a challenge for each of us to trust that those who inflicted suffering on communities and on a whole country can take a step forward.  It is true that in this enormous field of Colombia there is nevertheless room for weeds…  You must be attentive to the fruit… care for the wheat and do not lose peace because of the weeds.  When the sower finds weeds mingled with the wheat, he or she is not alarmed.  Search for the way in which the Word becomes incarnate in concrete situations and produces the fruit of new life, even if it appears to be imperfect or incomplete (cf. Evangelii Gaudium, 24).  Even when conflicts, violence and feelings of vengeance remain, may we not prevent justice and mercy from embracing Colombia’s painful history.  Let us heal that pain and welcome every person who has committed offences, who admits their failures, is repentant and truly wants to make reparation, thus contributing to the building of a new order where justice and peace shine forth.
As Juan Carlos has let us glimpse in his testimony, throughout this long, difficult, but hopeful process of reconciliation, it is also indispensable to come to terms with the truth.  It is a great challenge, but a necessary one.  Truth is an inseparable companion of justice and mercy.  Together they are essential to building peace; each, moreover, prevents the other from being altered and transformed into instruments of revenge against the weakest.  Indeed, truth should not lead to revenge, but rather to reconciliation and forgiveness.  Truth means telling families torn apart by pain what happened to their missing relatives.  Truth means confessing what happened to minors recruited by violent people.  Truth means recognizing the pain of women who are victims of violence and abuse.
          I wish finally, as a brother and a father, to say this: Colombia, open your heart as the People of God and be reconciled.  Fear neither the truth nor justice.  Dear people of Colombia: do not be afraid of asking for forgiveness and offering it.  Do not resist that reconciliation which allows you to draw near and encounter one another as brothers and sisters, and surmount enmity.  Now is the time to heal wounds, to build bridges, to overcome differences.  It is time to defuse hatred, to renounce vengeance, and to open yourselves to a coexistence founded on justice, truth, and the creation of a genuine culture of fraternal encounter.  May we live in harmony and solidarity, as the Lord desires.  Let us pray to be builders of peace, so that where there is hatred and resentment, we may bring love and mercy (cf. Prayer attributed to Saint Francis of Assisi).
I wish to place all of these intentions before the image of the Crucified One, the black Christ of Bojayá:
* * *
O black Christ of Bojayá, who remind us of your passion and death; together with your arms and feet they have torn away your children who sought refuge in you.
O black Christ of Bojayá, who look tenderly upon us and in whose face is serenity; your heart beats so that we may be received in your love. O black Christ of Bojayá, Grant us to commit ourselves to restoring your body. May we be your feet that go forth to encounter  our brothers and sisters in need; your arms to embrace  those who have lost their dignity; your hands to bless and console  those who weep alone. Make us witnesses to your love and infinite mercy. 

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Saturday September 9, 2017 - #Eucharist


Memorial of Saint Peter Claver, Priest
Lectionary: 436


Reading 1COL1:21-23

Brothers and sisters:
You once were alienated and hostile in mind because of evil deeds;
God has now reconciled you
in the fleshly Body of Christ through his death,
to present you holy, without blemish,
and irreproachable before him,
provided that you persevere in the faith,
firmly grounded, stable,
and not shifting from the hope of the Gospel that you heard,
which has been preached to every creature under heaven,
of which I, Paul, am a minister.

Responsorial PsalmPS 54:3-4, 6 AND 8

R. (6) God himself is my help.
O God, by your name save me,
and by your might defend my cause.
O God, hear my prayer;
hearken to the words of my mouth.
R. God himself is my help.
Behold, God is my helper;
the Lord sustains my life.
Freely will I offer you sacrifice;
I will praise your name, O LORD, for its goodness.
R. God himself is my help.

AlleluiaJN 14:6

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
I am the way and the truth and the life, says the Lord;
no one comes to the Father except through me.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelLK 6:1-5

While Jesus was going through a field of grain on a sabbath,
his disciples were picking the heads of grain,
rubbing them in their hands, and eating them.
Some Pharisees said,
"Why are you doing what is unlawful on the sabbath?"
Jesus said to them in reply,
"Have you not read what David did
when he and those who were with him were hungry?
How he went into the house of God, took the bread of offering,
which only the priests could lawfully eat,
ate of it, and shared it with his companions?"
Then he said to them, "The Son of Man is lord of the sabbath."

Prayer against Storms and special Prayers in Hurricane Season to SHARE -

The Prayer or Blessing Against Storms 
 (At each '†', make the Sign of The Cross) 
 Jesus Christ a King of Glory has come in Peace.† 
God became man,† 
and the Word was made flesh.† 
Christ was born of a Virgin.† 
Christ suffered.† 
Christ was crucified.† 
Christ died.† 
Christ rose from the dead.† 
Christ ascended into Heaven.† 
Christ conquers.† Christ reigns.† Christ orders.† 
May Christ protect us from all storms and lightning† 
Christ went through their midst in Peace,†
 and the word was made flesh.† 
Christ is with us with Mary.† 
Flee you enemy spirits because the Lion of the Generation of Juda, the Root David, has won.† Holy God!† Holy Powerful God!† Holy Immortal God!† Have mercy on us. Amen! 
 A Prayer for Hurricane Season
 O God, Master of this passing world, hear the humble voices of your children. The Sea of Galilee obeyed your order and returned to its former quietude; you are still the Master of land and sea. We live in the shadow of a danger over which we have no control. The Gulf, like a provoked and angry giant, can awake from its seeming lethargy, overstep its conventional boundaries, invade our land and spread chaos and disaster. During this hurricane season, we turn to You, O loving Father. Spare us from past tragedies whose memories are still so vivid and whose wounds seem to refuse to heal with the passing of time. O Virgin, Star of the Sea, Our Beloved Mother, we ask you to plead with your Son in our behalf, so that spared from the calamities common to this area and animated with a true spirit of gratitude, we will walk in the footsteps of your Divine Son to reach the heavenly Jerusalem where a storm-less eternity awaits us. Amen. 
 A PRAYER FOR HURRICANE SEASON 
 (Our Lady of Prompt Succor) Our Father in Heaven through the intercession of Our Lady of Prompt Succor, spare us during this Hurricane season from all harm. Protect us and our homes from all disasters of nature. Our Lady of Prompt Succor, hasten to help us. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen. Another Prayer to Avert Storms and Hurricanes Father, all the elements of nature obey your command. Calm the storms and hurricanes that threaten us and turn our fear of your power into praise of your goodness. Grant this through our Lord Jesus Christ, Your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever. Amen.