Sunday, January 18, 2015

Pope Francis celebrates largest Mass in History! Over 6 Million in Attendance - SHARE - in Philippines

Father Pope Francis celebrated Mass Sunday in Manila’s Luneta Park. Vatican Radio’s English Service, on Jan. 18, 2015. An estimated 6-7 million people attended his closing Mass. “The official number that has been given to us is between six and seven million,” Father Federico Lombardi told said at a press conference in Manila. He said it was "largest event of the history of the Popes." This was larger than the 1995 World Youth Day in Manila with Saint John Paul II, which gathered 4-5 million people. There are 88.9 Million Catholic in the Philippines.  Pope Francis will return to the Vatican on Jan. 19. The Metro Manila Development Authority said were 2.5 million along the route from the Nunciature, before you reach the park. Today was the feast of the Santo Niño, the Holy Child; therefore the Pope explained that we are all children of God. There were choirs and orchestras with over 1,000. Worshippers wore rain ponchos and held up flickering candles in the rain. The Pope himself wore a yellow poncho over his robe as he said the Mass. The crowd chanted, "Papa Francesco, Papa Francesco!" "In these days, throughout my visit, I have listened to you sing the song 'We are all God's children,'" he said. "All of us are God's children, members of God's family."  Tropical storm-force winds and rains did not deter the millions of people. About 25,000 Philippine police were there to maintain security.

Sunday Mass Online : January 18, 2015 - 2nd Ord. Time


Second Sunday of Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 65


Reading 11 SM 3:3B-10, 19

Samuel was sleeping in the temple of the LORD
where the ark of God was.
The LORD called to Samuel, who answered, “Here I am.”
Samuel ran to Eli and said, “Here I am. You called me.”
“I did not call you, “ Eli said. “Go back to sleep.”
So he went back to sleep.
Again the LORD called Samuel, who rose and went to Eli.
“Here I am, “ he said. “You called me.”
But Eli answered, “I did not call you, my son. Go back to sleep.”

At that time Samuel was not familiar with the LORD,
because the LORD had not revealed anything to him as yet.
The LORD called Samuel again, for the third time.
Getting up and going to Eli, he said, “Here I am. You called me.”
Then Eli understood that the LORD was calling the youth.
So he said to Samuel, “Go to sleep, and if you are called, reply,
Speak, LORD, for your servant is listening.”
When Samuel went to sleep in his place,
the LORD came and revealed his presence,
calling out as before, “Samuel, Samuel!”
Samuel answered, “Speak, for your servant is listening.”

Samuel grew up, and the LORD was with him,
not permitting any word of his to be without effect.

Responsorial PsalmPS 40:2, 4, 7-8, 8-9, 10

R. (8a and 9a) Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
I have waited, waited for the LORD,
and he stooped toward me and heard my cry.
And he put a new song into my mouth,
a hymn to our God.
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
Sacrifice or offering you wished not,
but ears open to obedience you gave me.
Holocausts or sin-offerings you sought not;
then said I, “Behold I come.”
R. Here I am, Lord; I come to do your will.
“In the written scroll it is prescribed for me,
to do your will, O my God, is my delight,
and your law is within my heart!”
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
I announced your justice in the vast assembly;
I did not restrain my lips, as you, O LORD, know.
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.

Reading 21 COR 6:13C-15A, 17-20

Brothers and sisters:
The body is not for immorality, but for the Lord,
and the Lord is for the body;
God raised the Lord and will also raise us by his power.

Do you not know that your bodies are members of Christ?
But whoever is joined to the Lord becomes one Spirit with him.
Avoid immorality.
Every other sin a person commits is outside the body,
but the immoral person sins against his own body.
Do you not know that your body
is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you,
whom you have from God, and that you are not your own?
For you have been purchased at a price.
Therefore glorify God in your body.

AlleluiaJN 1:41, 17B

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
We have found the Messiah:
Jesus Christ, who brings us truth and grace.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelJN 1:35-42

John was standing with two of his disciples,
and as he watched Jesus walk by, he said,
“Behold, the Lamb of God.”
The two disciples heard what he said and followed Jesus.
Jesus turned and saw them following him and said to them,
“What are you looking for?”
They said to him, “Rabbi” — which translated means Teacher —,
“where are you staying?”
He said to them, “Come, and you will see.”
So they went and saw where Jesus was staying,
and they stayed with him that day.
It was about four in the afternoon.
Andrew, the brother of Simon Peter,
was one of the two who heard John and followed Jesus.
He first found his own brother Simon and told him,
“We have found the Messiah” — which is translated Christ —.
Then he brought him to Jesus.
Jesus looked at him and said,
“You are Simon the son of John;
you will be called Cephas” — which is translated Peter.

Saint January 18 : Saint Margaret of Hungary : Nun and Mystic

 January 18 is the memorial of Saint Margaret of Hungary, a thirteenth century woman who is remembered as a nun, virgin, princess, and mystic.

Saint Margaret was born in A.D. 1242, the last daughter (ninth of 10 children) of the King of Hungary, Bela IV, and Maria Lascaris, the daughter of the emperor of Constantinople. Saint Margaret is the niece ofSaint Elizabeth of Hungaryand the younger sister of Saint Kinga and Blessed Yolanda.

Before Margaret's birth, her parents had promised Our Lord to dedicate their child to Him if Hungary was victorious over the invading Tartars. After their prayers were answered, now nearly four, they placed Margaret with the Dominican monastery of Veszprim. At the age of 12 Saint Margaret moved to a new monastery built by her father at Buda, and made profession of her final vows before Humbert of Romans.

Saint Margaret lived a life totally dedicated to Christ crucified and by her example of living inspired her sisters to follow her in her asceticism, works of mercy, pursuit of peace, and striving to be of humble service. Saint Margaret opposed all attempts by her father to arrange a political marriage between herself and King Ottokar II of Bohemia. Saint Margaret had a special love for the Eucharist and the Passion of Christ and showed a special devotion to the Holy Spirit and Our Lady.

Saint Margaret died on 18 January 1270. However, she was venerated as a saint during her lifetime. After her death the canonization investigation was begun immediately, including the testimony of 77 persons who said they had received miracles as a result of Saint Margaret's intercession. However, it was not until 19 November 1943 that Saint Margaret was canonized by Venerable Pope Pius XII, on the feast day of her cousin, Saint Elizabeth of Hungary.
(Edited from acta-sanctorum.blogspot.ca)

Prayer

O God of truth,
through the Holy Spirit
you blessed our sister Margaret with true humility.
Teach us that same integrity
so that we may constantly turn from our selfishness
to your love.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.

Amen.

Saint January 18 : St. Volusian : Bishop


BISHOP


     Information:
Feast Day:January 18
Died496
Volusian was bishop of Tours, in France, the see made famous by St. Martin two centuries earlier. He lived at a time before clerical celibacy had been enforced in the West and was married to a woman famous for her violent temper, which was a great trial to the bishop. He also lived in a time when the barbarian invasions had begun and the fear of the Goths was everywhere.
In writing to a friend of his, a certain Bishop Ruricius, of nearby Limoges, St. Volusian expressed his fear of the Goths who were beginning to terrorize his diocese. Ruricius humorously replied that someone who lived with terror inside his house, meaning his wife, should have no fear of terrors from the outside.
Volusian was of senatorial rank, very wealthy, a relative of the bishop who preceded him, St. Perpetuus, and he lived in the days when Clovis was king of the Franks, the avowed enemy of the Goths.
As the Goths began to overrun Volusian's diocese, they suspected him of sympathies with Clovis and of wanting to subject them to the Franks, so Volusian was driven from his see and sent into exile.
He held the office of bishop in a very difficult time, when the whole of Western Europe was in turmoil, in the wake of the barbarian invasions from the East. Cities were sacked, government disrupted, and bishops were the only agents of stability as civil government collapsed. Gregory of  Tours, who succeeded Volusian as bishop of Tours a century later, describes the turmoil of the times, and it is from his writings that we get our knowledge of Volusian.
We have no further information about Volusian's wife or his family, and we are not sure whether he died in southern France or in Spain. It is simply known that he was driven from his see, went into exile, and died after ruling as bishop for seven years.
Thought for the Day: Most of us live in very stable times, and it is difficult to imagine what it would be like if our country were invaded and national and state government ceased to exist. Our dependence on Divine Providence would be more obvious then, and our faith would have to give us strength in very different ways. The saints kept faith in the most difficult of times and leaned on God in every crisis.
From 'The Catholic One Year Bible': "A tree is identified by its fruit. A tree from a select variety produces good fruit; poor varieties, don't.... A good man's speech reveals the rich treasures within him. An evil-hearted man is filled with venom, and his speech reveals it."—Matthew 12:33, 35


SOURCE: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/V/stvolusian.asp#ixzz1jr3mcgBy

Sunday Mass with Pope Francis from Philippines - Full Text Homily - Video


Pope Francis celebrates Mass at Rizal Park in Manila, Philippines - RV
18/01/2015 09:00


(Vatican Radio)  Pope Francis on Sunday called on Filipinos to be “outstanding missionaries of the faith in Asia” during a mass attended by millions in Manila’s Rizal Park.  In his homily, Pope Francis described the Philippines as “the foremost Catholic country in Asia,” saying “this is itself a special gift of God, a blessing,” and a “vocation.” 
Listen to Pope Francis' Homily:
The Pope recalled that each of us has been chosen by God to be "witnesses of his truth and his justice in this world" and to care for creation.  But man, he said, has "disfigured that natural beauty; through sin, man has also destroyed the unity and beauty of our human family, creating social structures which perpetuate poverty, ignorance and corruption."
The Pope warned against the devil, “the father of lies” who hides his snares behind the appearance of sophistication, the allure of being ‘modern’, ‘like everyone else.’  We are distracted, he said, by “ephemeral pleasures and superficial pastimes” and “squander our God-given gifts by tinkering with gadgets,” and “squander our money on gambling and drink.”
On the day the Filipino Church celebrates the "Santo Niño," Pope Francis urged Filippinos to look to the Christ Child, the protector of the Philippines, as their model, and reminded them of the importance of protecting the family. He added, “we need to see each child as a gift to be welcomed, cherished and protected” and recalled that young people need our care so they will not be “robbed of hope and condemned to life on the streets.”
He urged Filipinos to work together to build “a world of justice, integrity and peace.”
Below please find the text of Pope Francis’ Homily at Sunday’s mass in Manila’s Rizal park:
“A child is born to us, a son is given us” (Is 9:5).  It is a special joy for me to celebrate Santo Niño Sunday with you.  The image of the Holy Child Jesus accompanied the spread of the Gospel in this country from the beginning.  Dressed in the robes of a king, crowned and holding the sceptre, the globe and the cross, he continues to remind us of the link between God’s Kingdom and the mystery of spiritual childhood.  He tells us this in today’s Gospel: “Whoever does not accept the Kingdom of God like a child will not enter it” (Mk 10:15).  The Santo Niño continues to proclaim to us that the light of God’s grace has shone upon a world dwelling in darkness, bringing the Good News of our freedom from slavery, and guiding us in the paths of peace, right and justice.  The Santo Niño also reminds us of our call to spread the reign of Christ throughout the world.
            In these days, throughout my visit, I have listened to you sing the song: “We are all God’s children”.  That is what the Santo Niño tells us.  He reminds us of our deepest identity.  All of us are God’s children, members of God’s family.  Today Saint Paul has told us that in Christ we have become God’s adopted children, brothers and sisters in Christ.  This is who we are.  This is our identity.  We saw a beautiful expression of this when Filipinos rallied around our brothers and sisters affected by the typhoon. 
            The Apostle tells us that because God chose us, we have been richly blessed!  God “has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavens” (Eph 1:3).  These words have a special resonance in the Philippines, for it is the foremost Catholic country in Asia; this is itself a special gift of God, a special blessing.  But it is also a vocation.  Filipinos are called to be outstanding missionaries of the faith in Asia.
            God chose and blessed us for a purpose: to be holy and blameless in his sight (Eph 1:4).  He chose us, each of us to be witnesses of his truth and his justice in this world.  He created the world as a beautiful garden and asked us to care for it.  But through sin, man has disfigured that natural beauty; through sin, man has also destroyed the unity and beauty of our human family, creating social structures which perpetuate poverty, ignorance and corruption. 
            Sometimes, when we see the troubles, difficulties and wrongs all around us, we are tempted to give up.  It seems that the promises of the Gospel do not apply; they are unreal.  But the Bible tells us that the great threat to God’s plan for us is, and always has been, the lie.  The devil is the father of lies.  Often he hides his snares behind the appearance of sophistication, the allure of being “modern”, “like everyone else”.  He distracts us with the promise of ephemeral pleasures, superficial pastimes.  And so we squander our God-given gifts by tinkering with gadgets; we squander our money on gambling and drink; we turn in on ourselves.  We forget to remain focused on the things that really matter.  We forget to remain, at heart, children of God. That is sin: [to] forget at heart that we are children of God.  For children, as the Lord tells us, have their own wisdom, which is not the wisdom of the world.  That is why the message of the Santo Niño is so important.  He speaks powerfully to all of us.  He reminds us of our deepest identity, of what we are called to be as God’s family.
            The Santo Niño also reminds us that this identity must be protected.  The Christ Child is the protector of this great country.  When he came into the world, his very life was threatened by a corrupt king.  Jesus himself needed to be protected.  He had an earthly protector: Saint Joseph.  He had an earthly family, the Holy Family of Nazareth.  So he reminds us of the importance of protecting our families, and those larger families which are the Church, God’s family, and the world, our human family.  Sadly, in our day, the family all too often needs to be protected against insidious attacks and programs contrary to all that we hold true and sacred, all that is most beautiful and noble in our culture.
            In the Gospel, Jesus welcomes children, he embraces them and blesses them (Mk 10:16).  We too need to protect, guide and encourage our young people, helping them to build a society worthy of their great spiritual and cultural heritage.  Specifically, we need to see each child as a gift to be welcomed, cherished and protected.  And we need to care for our young people, not allowing them to be robbed of hope and condemned to life on the streets.
            It was a frail child, in need of protection, who brought God’s goodness, mercy and justice into the world.  He resisted the dishonesty and corruption which are the legacy of sin, and he triumphed over them by the power of his cross.  Now, at the end of my visit to the Philippines, I commend you to him, to Jesus who came among us as a child.  May he enable all the beloved people of this country to work together, protecting one another, beginning with your families and communities, in building a world of justice, integrity and peace.  May the Santo Niño continue to bless the Philippines and may he sustain the Christians of this great nation in their vocation to be witnesses and missionaries of the joy of the Gospel, in Asia and in the whole world.
            Please don’t forget to pray for me!  God bless you !